mite vs might

mite might

Definitions

  • 1) A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. The name is also applied to the lepton, a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
  • 2) A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.
  • 3) Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle. Sometimes used adverbially.
  • 4) A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc. See Acarina.
  • 5) A widow's mite.
  • 6) A very small contribution or amount of money.
  • 7) A very small object, creature, or particle.
  • 8) A coin of very small value, especially an obsolete British coin worth half a farthing.
  • 9) Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.
  • 10) Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle.
  • 11) A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. The name is also applied to a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; See acarina.
  • 13) any of numerous very small to minute arachnids often infesting animals or plants or stored foods
  • 14) Some insect like or likened to a mite, as a dust-louse (Psocus).
  • 15) An English weight somewhat heavier than a grain troy.
  • 16) An old money of account, the twenty-fourth part of a penny.
  • 17) Anything very small; a very little particle or quantity: also applied to persons.
  • 18) A small arachnidan of the order Acarida; any acarid.
  • 19) A copper or billon coin of very small value, current in Brabant and Holland.
  • 20) A small coin of any kind, of slight value; any very small sum of money. No coin seems to have been so called specifically.
  • 21) (a mite) To a small degree; somewhat.

Definitions

  • 1) uncountable The ability to do something.
  • 2) uncountable Physical strength.
  • 3) uncountable Power, strength, force or influence held by a person or group.
  • 4) Great power or force, as of a nation or army.
  • 5) Physical strength: synonym: strength.
  • 6) See under 2d Main.
  • 7) Force or power of any kind, whether of body or mind; energy or intensity of purpose, feeling, or action; means or resources to effect an object; strength; force; power; ability; capacity.
  • 8) physical strength
  • 9) Preterit of may.
  • 10) The quality of being able; ability to do or act; power; active personal force or strength, physical or mental: as, a man of might; the might of intellect.
  • 11) Power of control or compulsion; ability to wield or direct force; commanding strength: as, the might of empire.
  • 12) Physical force; material energy.
  • 13) obsolete Mighty; powerful; possible.
  • 14) auxiliary Simple past of may. Used to indicate permission in past tense.
  • 15) auxiliary Simple past of may. Used to indicate possibility in past tense.
  • 16) auxiliary Used to indicate conditional or possible actions.
  • 17) imp.ofmay.
  • 18) Used to express a higher degree of deference or politeness than may, ought, or should:
  • 19) Used to express possibility or probability or permission in the past.
  • 20) Used to indicate a possibility or probability that is weaker than may:
  • 21) Used to indicate a condition or state contrary to fact.

Examples

  • 1) The little mite had been covered by a white blanket.
  • 2) Let's hope the poor mite feels better this time.
  • 3) The picture of these poor mites could not be more wretched.
  • 4) Will she be found or will something awful happen to the little mite?
  • 5) This can make the experience feel a mite less magical.
  • 6) One particular problem is a mite which causes the buds to swell and can spread viruses.
  • 7) One poor mite was squashed at the back of the pack with an elbow in the eye.
  • 8) Doctors were unable to save the little mite.
  • 9) Now they know how that poor little mite felt.
  • 10) No wonder the poor mite caught her death and had to pull out.
  • 11) No doubt there will be the usual round of lucrative magazine deals and photo opportunities surrounding the little mite.
  • 12) That poor little mite should have been taken away from his filthy home and placed with loving adoptive parents.
  • 13) How does the poor mite cope?
  • 14) Dust mites live in our beds, feeding off dead skin.
  • 15) The question is: who loves the little mite enough to let him go?
  • 16) Also shown in close-up are domestic dust mites and other little critters grazing on pavement moss.
  • 17) The twisted, evil parents of the poor little mite are.
  • 18) This helps reduce disease and pest problems, such as big bud mite that causes the buds to swell.
  • 19) I reckon they were all dazzled by dollar signs and thought they would make a fortune from the eight little mites.
  • 20) British boffins found it makes beds less appealing to house dust mites, the tiny creatures thought to cause asthma and other allergies.
  • 21) The gorgeous little mite is, luckily, too young to understand.
  • 22) A This is likely to be pear leaf blister mites, which live inside the leaves.
  • 23) September 1, 2008 at 8:15 am yew mite want to haz a sign up sheet fur us…… den yew cud get teh x-tra credit in skool…..mite be!
  • 24) This could also help explain why bees infected with IAPV in Australia where the mite is absent do not show as dramatic changes in their behaviour, say scientists.
  • 25) He points out that the varroa mite, which is prevalent in the US, weakens the immune system of bees, perhaps making them susceptible to IAPV.
  • 26) Even a century later, had physicians made better use of their microscopes, they could hardly have overlooked such an easily found parasite as the itch mite, which is quite as easily detected as the cheese mite, pictured in Hooke's book.
  • 27) Funds, in which our mite is a mere drop in the ocean, when by sending up
  • 28) The mite was a waif too, alone in the world when his father was at sea, pathetically helpless, with no defence against blows and unkindness.
  • 29) Histiostomatidae which is still alive, in the likes of the pitcher plant mite, which is found within the pitcher leaves of North American purple pitcher plants.
  • 30) In a Cameroon painting, the widow giving the mite is a young woman with a baby in her arms.
  • 31) An insect discovered at the site after fumigation in May was deemed not to be a bed bug but a clover mite, which is not harmful to furniture or humans, he said.
  • 32) ‘All of these arthropods are known predators of insect eggs; on at least 17 plants, adult mites were directly observed attacking eggs.’
  • 33) ‘Dust mites are very minute arachnids (related to spiders) that live primarily on flakes of human skin.’
  • 34) ‘But a parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has started to wreak havoc on honeybee colonies.’
  • 35) ‘Ticks belong to the class Arachnida, which counts mites, spiders and scorpions among its members.’
  • 36) ‘While the true scorpions have been classified in the Arachnida along with the scorpions, spiders, mites, etc, these being primarily terrestrial.’
  • 37) ‘Arachnids are members of a class of animals that includes spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks.’
  • 38) ‘On the other hand, although they are also primarily decomposers associated with soils, certain oribatid mites are herbivorous on living plants.’
  • 39) ‘While the hybrid zone in North America has not been studied, it is possible that its dynamics have been changed by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor.’
  • 40) ‘Living among these early land plants were a diverse selection of arthropods, including spiders, mites, myriapods and collembolids’
  • 41) ‘He was calling to ask me what I knew about scabies, parasitic mites that infest human skin; somehow, scabies figured into a child custody dispute.’
  • 42) ‘For the most part, the so-called feather mites live a quiet life, hanging out on the surface of bird feathers, feeding off oil and fungi.’
  • 43) ‘Some arachnid chelicerates are parasites, such as ticks and mites.’
  • 44) ‘Passed from dog to dog, adult female sarcoptic mange mites tunnel under a dog's skin to lay eggs.’
  • 45) ‘As I watched, several kinds of ants crossed my view, followed by a tiny red mite, a sizable wolf spider, and two colorful jumping spiders.’
  • 46) ‘While the plight of parasitic lice and mites are unlikely to attract outpourings of public sympathy, more charismatic insects are also at risk.’
  • 47) ‘The most important of these include a predatory spider mite, the mite destroyer beetle, the six-spotted thrips and the minute pirate bug.’
  • 48) ‘Hummingbirds often pick up nectar mites when they visit flowers.’
  • 49) ‘Methods for improving the residual control of mites and prolonging the protection of plants from mites infestations’
  • 50) ‘Vacuuming removes mite allergen from carpets but is inefficient at removing live mites.’
  • 51) ‘In captive conditions, mites such as the red mite can live in cracks in and around the perch.’
  • 52) ‘His cold has developed into full blown ‘smoker's cough’ this morning, poor little mite.’
  • 53) ‘‘She's just a poor little mite - I feel terrible as a person having to say this kind of thing but I didn't know what else to do I was so desperate,’ he said.’
  • 54) ‘Poor little mite was rather disappointed when he realised it was months away yet, but it hasn't seemed to stop him asking again at regular intervals throughout the day.’
  • 55) ‘Poor little mite was most disturbed by the adventure and shivered in my arms, probably not from fear but more from uncertainty.’
  • 56) ‘Poor little mite, you can just see the new spots appearing as you watch.’
  • 57) ‘Poor little mite is going to hate going to the surgery at the end of all this.’
  • 58) ‘She's been having a nightmare, poor little mite.’
  • 59) ‘The poor little mite was obviously distressed and was hobbling around on its good leg, often resting on the ground.’
  • 60) ‘A mite of a bird must have decided his statue presented refuge.’
  • 61) ‘It's not right that those who are die close to you are your own age or younger when you're but a mite of a sweet boy.’
  • 62) ‘I'm gonna have to get him to the vets very soon the poor mite, he seems happy enough other than a bit of scratching though.’
  • 63) ‘And then she asks that the wedding feast be cooked without a mite of salt.’
  • 64) ‘He's a strong, practiced businessman and never lets a mite of logic slip from his grasp.’
  • 65) ‘Is anyone else feeling a mite peckish just now?’
  • 66) ‘A fair few are competent although scarcely memorable, a mite predictable, but all the books contain stories that could at least be considered for any ‘best of’ collection.’
  • 67) ‘We shot a lot of video that night, but these clips are from late in the evening, after much of that licorice-flavored liquor had been consumed, and we're both a mite tiddly.’
  • 68) ‘It seems a mite inconsistent to use your celebrity status to advance your politics and then complain that your politics is impacting your celebrity status.’
  • 69) ‘But this system for entering my thoughts seems a mite obtuse.’
  • 70) ‘You said, ‘an infallible definition is never new revelation’ but isn't that just a mite disingenuous?’
  • 71) ‘But since I was sitting right in front of it, with my back to it, I felt a mite self-conscious with all these faces turned in my direction.’
  • 72) ‘The rest of my airforce career was a mite strange.’
  • 73) ‘Unfortunately, my near-perpetual state of blissful inebriation at the time renders the recollections a mite blurry.’
  • 74) ‘For their part, the zoo officials were also a mite apprehensive about letting a crowd form around the enclosure where the big cat was giving birth.’
  • 75) ‘Alas, they failed to heed me, and as a result the traditional New Year predictions column is a mite trickier than it used to be.’
  • 76) ‘I was just your normal kid, content to lead a normal, non-distinguished life, only I was a mite troublesome.’
  • 77) ‘He tends to have an unsettling effect on younger members of the force, who may be a mite intimidated by the longevity of his career.’
  • 78) ‘Later the barman came over to us to ask us if we could tone the children down a mite.’
  • 79) ‘The young fans were a mite disappointed, though, as the movie progressed, at the ‘deviations’ that the movie took from the book.’
  • 80) ‘The new model rides well and handles assuredly on long sweeping corners, but seems a mite too softly sprung on sharper bends.’
  • 81) ‘Undoubtedly he is arrogant, a man not prone to shy from a fight. He's an earnest football coach with huge ambition, even if his focus on defence is a mite negative for some tastes.’
  • 82) ‘She should be a mite bit more familiar with the history of the institution in which she works.’
  • 83) ‘But for those of us jaded enough to have been at last week's dinner party, it looks a mite bit lacking.’
  • 84) ‘The mad dash for foreigners to man pivotal positions has gone a mite too far.’

Examples

  • 1) And they encourage people to use ingredients they might not be familiar with.
  • 2) We should ask ourselves too whether on some of her chosen issues she might actually be right.
  • 3) This might force ministers into more spending cuts.
  • 4) The one reform that might make a difference is financial.
  • 5) Hopefully one time in the future we might get a chance to redeem ourselves.
  • 6) There might be something in the midlife crisis cliché.
  • 7) There were 155 passengers and crew members on a plane that might soon be sinking.
  • 8) In the past there might have been one or two contenders but this time there are at least four sides who can win it.
  • 9) Power parting might sound contrived, but it's got to be better than this.
  • 10) This is just to give you some idea of the treatments that might be used.
  • 11) We all joined the service knowing full well what might be expected of us.
  • 12) Perhaps the army might be the making of him.
  • 13) These little details might make a difference.
  • 14) Soon perhaps he might return to normality.
  • 15) In days past he might have been tempted to cash in on his success instantly.
  • 16) She is also worried that the economic downturn might lead to more crime.
  • 17) There remained two respects in which it might affect their rights.
  • 18) Your poor ma and pa may have left something that might be just the thing.
  • 19) The healthy snack might go some way to explaining his stamina as he approaches his tenth decade.
  • 20) You might think that financial meltdown would destroy the arts.
  • 21) Their own bowling strength might be about to come under scrutiny.
  • 22) Though a note from your doc might help in future.
  • 23) The concepts might come in useful in and out of the workplace.
  • 24) The five cups of coffee he drinks each day might also have something to do with it.
  • 25) Our eyes are there to help us discern so we might as well use them.
  • 26) They might be full one way but empty the other.
  • 27) I kind of agree with this, except dogs might *might* be an exception.
  • 28) I might - *might* - consider not buying the manga I'd never heard of before but looks oh-so interesting if I knew any of these were coming out that week:
  • 29) For instance, I can think of one way the Republicans might, just *might*, retain control of both houses: if they impeach and convict Bush and Cheney themselves, before the next election.
  • 30) I wrote about what might–and I emphasize the word *might*–be an indication that some small steps have actually been taken in my Blog-Against-Sexism-Day post.
  • 31) Arizona because it suddenly occurred to me that the police might -- just * might* -- come and take away my computer.
  • 32) All at once the thought struck him that he himself might be the person accused, and the bare idea that such _might_ be the case sent the blood to his heart and a cold shudder through his frame.
  • 33) It might go wrong with you -- only _might_ -- but I want, I must have, your consent.
  • 34) With reasonable care the thing might be done almost with impunity -- though there was never wanting, of course, the not entirely unpleasurable excitement of knowing that you were breaking the law, that somebody _might_ have turned informer, and that at any moment a raid might be made.
  • 35) It might rain tomorrow, and 'sides, it _might_ take us more'n
  • 36) If a woman might not do this, what, in heaven's name, _might_ she do?
  • 37) ‘A Morrison spokesman would not deny a report that the brothers might buy back the company.’
  • 38) ‘A farmer can report what he thinks might be foot and mouth, a vet has to be called, and a blood test done.’
  • 39) ‘A permanent lunar base might then provide a springboard for a trip to Mars.’
  • 40) ‘We are left to wonder what more it might achieve if conditions were better.’
  • 41) ‘They had no choice but to turn around and go back to conditions that might have ended their lives.’
  • 42) ‘We had been optimistic that track conditions might suit us during the race, but that did not happen.’
  • 43) ‘Overall it was a fair performance from the local side who might well have won but for a few crucial errors.’
  • 44) ‘No, she does not, despite the fact his manoeuvre denied her the chance to stand as deputy, a post she might have won.’
  • 45) ‘Had Italy turned pressure into tries they might well have won the match.’
  • 46) ‘Who knows, but if we had won that day we might not have made the changes that we did make to the panel for the league.’
  • 47) ‘I still remember the time my parents steered me clear of any stall where I might have won a goldfish.’
  • 48) ‘I thought the performance against West Brom was good and with a bit more luck we might have won the game.’
  • 49) ‘If this were just a question of her as a reporter that might not have been a problem.’
  • 50) ‘There was a faint possibility she might have died from the resultant fumes.’
  • 51) ‘However, Jesus knew that the law was given so that mankind might understand the purposes of God.’
  • 52) ‘But when a friend suggested the story might not be true she contacted the Advertiser for help.’
  • 53) ‘Powerful minds can project incredibly rich suggestions of what it might feel like, but you don't know.’
  • 54) ‘I was wondering if you have any suggestions as to what might be best for me considering his size.’
  • 55) ‘There is no suggestion that any schools might close or face restructuring.’
  • 56) ‘Suggestions for reforms that might limit house price inflation are plentiful enough.’
  • 57) ‘We have a few suggestions that might work and they can be summed up in one word: layering.’
  • 58) ‘He then asked doctors to phone in with suggestions of what might be wrong with him.’
  • 59) ‘I've made a few suggestions for things she might add to her site and she's always extremely grateful.’
  • 60) ‘My suggestions for what might be happening were treated with, I felt, derision.’
  • 61) ‘Do you have any suggestions as to what might be causing it and what I can do to remedy the problem?’
  • 62) ‘There are also three reasons to kill off news reports because they might impact stability.’
  • 63) ‘Reports that the guns might be destined for sale to the drugs underworld were dismissed as pure speculation.’
  • 64) ‘It might endanger other reporters to have it publicly known that this deception is practised.’
  • 65) ‘I knew they would not be reported missing right away and might never be reported missing.’
  • 66) ‘On the issue of what these common values might be, the report provides no answers.’
  • 67) ‘Some might say his report has extended a similar protection to those who govern us.’
  • 68) ‘There was also deep anger at reports that colleges might be privatised.’
  • 69) ‘That's important, but I have to remain open to the possibility that now might be the time to cut my losses and flee.’
  • 70) ‘Identical reports might elicit different responses from different committees.’
  • 71) ‘They might be basing their charges on some kind of analogy to the cost of the hotel room.’
  • 72) ‘The might of the Indian Army was on display as battle tanks and mounted missiles rolled out.’
  • 73) ‘We must encourage our leaders to use their heads rather than their might.’
  • 74) ‘They should use their might to challenge and change the laws of this land.’
  • 75) ‘It can handle a bit of rough treatment, so kids can use all their might to pull out a stalk.’
  • 76) ‘The authorities told them they were privileged to witness the might of the Soviet military machine.’
  • 77) ‘The might of the Roman Empire came from its wealth in precious metals, not from its productivity.’
  • 78) ‘The might and depth of the team was immediately evident, and with that comes a rise in the pressure on a driver.’
  • 79) ‘He said the pen earlier and now the mouse of the computer is more powerful than the might of the canon.’
  • 80) ‘The empathy was evidently always with the freedom fighter as he took on the might of the oppressor.’
  • 81) ‘Even against the might of the party machines they will be difficult to dislodge.’
  • 82) ‘However, he believes in the might of the pen and claims not to have used a computer.’
  • 83) ‘More than that, he knew his friend would cope against the might of Real Madrid.’
  • 84) ‘Now they face the might of Russia in a qualifier which has huge ramifications for the national side.’
  • 85) ‘There's no doubting that the might and grandeur of big mountains can make you feel very humble.’
  • 86) ‘Nor has it abated since she gave up fiction to challenge the might of the Indian state’
  • 87) ‘With the might of the US behind them, it's as easy as shooting fish in a barrel for them.’
  • 88) ‘What has maintained the old world order has been the might of the omnipotent dollar.’
  • 89) ‘Their security doesn't depend on the might of their individual parts, but their ability to operate as a sum.’
  • 90) ‘She took on not only the might of the oceans, but also the might of reality, and has triumphed gloriously over both.’
  • 91) ‘He called together the remnants of his tribe and the might of the enemy was overturned.’
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