mantle vs mantel

mantle mantel

Definitions

  • 1) The outer covering of a wall.
  • 2) Geology The zone of the earth between the crust and the core.
  • 3) The shoulder feathers, upper back, and sometimes the wings of a bird when differently colored from the rest of the body.
  • 4) Something that covers, envelops, or conceals.
  • 5) The soft outer wall lining the shell of a tunicate or barnacle.
  • 6) A zone of hot gases around a flame.
  • 7) A device in gas lamps consisting of a sheath of threads that gives off brilliant illumination when heated by the flame.
  • 8) A fold or pair of folds of the body wall that covers the internal organs and typically secretes the substance that forms the shell in mollusks and brachiopods.
  • 9) A loose sleeveless coat worn over outer garments; a cloak.
  • 10) The role or appearance of an authoritative or important person.
  • 11) The outer wall and casing of a blast furnace above the hearth.
  • 12) Anatomy The cerebral cortex.
  • 13) Any free, outer membrane.
  • 14) The outer wall and casing of a blast furnace, above the hearth.
  • 15) The back of a bird together with the folded wings.
  • 16) (Geol.) The highly viscous shell of hot semisolid rock, about 1800 miles thick, lying under the crust of the Earth and above the core. Also, by analogy, a similar shell on any other planet.
  • 17) (Her.) Same as Mantling.
  • 18) A loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak.
  • 19) (Arch.) A mantel. See Mantel.
  • 20) (Hydraulic Engin.) A penstock for a water wheel.
  • 21) The external fold, or folds, of the soft, exterior membrane of the body of a mollusk. It usually forms a cavity inclosing the gills. See Illusts. of Buccinum, and Byssus.
  • 22) Figuratively, a cover or covering; something that conceals.
  • 23) In zoology and anatomy, some part or organ which covers, conceals, or mantles: In Mollusca, the pallium. In Cirripedia, the sac, formed by the dorsal part of the integument, which incloses the body. In ornithology, the pallium or stragulum. See stragulum. The tunic of an ascidian.
  • 24) The outer enveloping masonry of a blast-furnace.
  • 25) A loose sleeveless garment worn as an outer covering, falling in straight lines from the shoulders; a simple kind of cloak.
  • 26) An inclosed chute which leads water from a fore-bay to a water-wheel.
  • 27) In founding, a covering of porous clay laid over a pattern in wax. When heat is applied the wax melts and runs out, leaving the clay mantle in condition to serve as a mold.
  • 28) Specifically— An outer covering of a wall, differing in material from the inner part.
  • 29) In the incandescent gas-light of Dr. Auer von Weisbach, a tube variously composed of one or more of the oxids of zirconium, lanthanum, thorium, and cerium, and prepared by dipping a tube of cotton netting (made by a knitting-machine) into a solution, or mixed solutions, of the oxid or oxids, thus coating the filaments, which after coating are burned out, leaving a consolidated tube.
  • 30) In heraldry, same as mantling, 3.
  • 31) To spread or become extended over a surface.
  • 32) To become covered with a coating, as scum or froth on the surface of a liquid.
  • 33) To blush.
  • 34) To cover with a mantle.
  • 35) To cover with something that acts like a mantle; cover, envelop, or conceal.
  • 36) To gather, assume, or take on, a covering, as froth, scum, etc.
  • 37) To spread over the surface as a covering; to overspread.
  • 38) To spread out; -- said of wings.
  • 39) To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.
  • 40) To cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise.

Definitions

  • 1) the shelf above a fireplace which may be also a structural support for the masonry of the chimney
  • 2) An ornamental facing around a fireplace.
  • 3) The protruding shelf over a fireplace.
  • 4) (Arch.) The finish around a fireplace, covering the chimney-breast in front and sometimes on both sides; especially, a shelf above the fireplace, and its supports. The shelf is called also a mantelpiece or mantlepiece.
  • 5) shelf that projects from wall above fireplace
  • 6) In a restricted sense, a mantel-shelf.
  • 7) In architecture, all the work or facing around a fireplace, resting against the chimney, and usually projecting and more or less ornamental.
  • 8) In geometry, lateral surface: as, the mantel of a frustum.
  • 9) 1. A cloak. See mantle (the present spelling in this sense).

Examples

  • 1) The second was in this rather audacious attempt to claim the mantle of the trade unions.
  • 2) There is evidence that the deeper layers of the mantle may be somewhat different in composition.
  • 3) The result is that these same elements are relatively depleted in the mantle above the core.
  • 4) Do you know what a gas mantle is?
  • 5) The first half comprises journalists and editors who may well take up the mantle.
  • 6) He wears the mantle of office comfortably and looks as if he is enjoying himself.
  • 7) He is ready to take on the mantle.
  • 8) Time waits for no man and the sport must look to those who can take over the mantle.
  • 9) Any profit that they made would then be reinvested to enable another woman to take up the mantle.
  • 10) They claim the mantle of freedom, too.
  • 11) We had a paraffin lamp, and in the front room we had gas with a mantle.
  • 12) Claiming the mantle of science, these voices have indulged instead in scaremongering.
  • 13) In keeping with the law, he also would have taken the mantle of leadership in the family.
  • 14) But the intention is clear - to be blunt about the scale of the problem but claim the mantle of fairness.
  • 15) What a mantle to inherit.
  • 16) Can he inherit his mantle?
  • 17) This is a country that has grown used, over centuries, to wearing a mantle of greatness.
  • 18) Frankly I couldn't have wished to inherit the mantle off a nicer man.
  • 19) I wear the mantle of The Dude proudly.
  • 20) There is a vast amount of uranium still left in the earth's crust and mantle; there are four billion tonnes of the stuff dissolved in the oceans.
  • 21) So far, no politician has emerged as a leader of the Tea Party movement – and the question of just who might eventually take up the mantle is a hot topic on the bus.
  • 22) Picking up the mantle is a relative newcomer: Lu Din Gee Cafe, where seven of us gathered recently for a duck feast.
  • 23) I had opened it at a Gnostic Hymn that told of a certain King’s son who, being exiled, slept in Egypt—a symbol of the natural state—and how an Angel while he slept brought him a royal mantle; and at the bottom of the page I found a footnote saying that the word mantle did not represent the meaning properly, for that which the Angel gave had the exile’s own form and likeness.
  • 24) ‘She clapped her little white hands for her attending eunuch, and let the flabby monster wrap her in her mantle.’
  • 25) ‘Her eyes were everywhere: on my gown, my mantle, our horses, and most of all, I thought, resting on the face of Gyric, with its linen wrap over the eyes.’
  • 26) ‘Tamora drew her cloak about her, appreciating the warm mantle with its fur lining, whilst the air chapped her lips and pinched her nose and cheeks.’
  • 27) ‘A mantle billowed up from the cloak and settled about her shoulders, holding the medallion in place.’
  • 28) ‘Mary stands within a rayed mandorla, dressed in a mantle fastened by cords, over a gown.’
  • 29) ‘The stress in the whole collection falls on the classical mantles, and suits with waist-length coats have been combined with A-like silhouettes.’
  • 30) ‘In the painting Mark stands in a pulpit, preaching to a group of women swathed in white mantles.’
  • 31) ‘She came to the conclusion that Bridget and Sibyl Nevile were just children and pulled her mantle over her wet shoulders in a pout.’
  • 32) ‘His long-nailed, perfectly manicured white hands clutched at her, dragging the mantle off her face.’
  • 33) ‘It had a more classic style than Brigg's own coat, and it even sported a mantle over the shoulders.’
  • 34) ‘The lower part of her mantle cascades in regular folds, but the hem represents a noticeable display of wind blown drapery.’
  • 35) ‘She was dressed richly, both her gown and mantle a rich scarlet velvet, trimmed in beautiful white fox fur.’
  • 36) ‘Her back was turned to me, so I could only see her short crop of black hair and the red mantle she wore.’
  • 37) ‘It had snowed for the last few days, and the woods were buried in a perfect untouched mantle of thick fresh snow.’
  • 38) ‘Thirty miles away, the lofty peaks appeared sugar coated under their mantle of winter snow.’
  • 39) ‘There is enough filtered moonlight to reveal the tip of a glacier hanging like a tongue out of the mantle of clouds.’
  • 40) ‘And in the distance suddenly emerging from its mantle of clouds, the impressive sight of a snow-capped Mount Rainier.’
  • 41) ‘Much of the island is a mantle of ice more than half a mile thick.’
  • 42) ‘Geologists have been intrigued that such massive failures could take place in a rocky terrain with a thin mantle of soil in otherwise stable landforms.’
  • 43) ‘The highest mountains were cloaked in mantles of snow and ice with glaciers perched in the hanging valleys as though suspended by some invisible thread from the summits.’
  • 44) ‘Wrapped in fleecelike mantles of bacteria, the worms live in papery tubes, which they burrow into the sides of deep-sea geysers.’
  • 45) ‘She could see nothing for miles but more stony peaks glittering in their mantles of silver and white.’
  • 46) ‘Juveniles appear similar to adults in non-breeding plumage, but the gray mantle is mottled.’
  • 47) ‘Yellow wings, closed at his back in a mantle that stretched from shoulder to ankle, opened.’
  • 48) ‘During a night watch, while the male godwits were incubating, it was noted that the females stood sleeping on the poles with their bills tucked backwards in their mantles.’
  • 49) ‘In breeding plumage, it has a light gray mantle with silvery-white primaries.’
  • 50) ‘They are characterized by a single, pseudobivalved shell which enclosed the mantle and muscular foot.’
  • 51) ‘A bivalve is characterized by possessing two shells secreted by a mantle that extends in a sheet on either side of the body.’
  • 52) ‘Squids on earth still have a vestige of a shell inside their mantles.’
  • 53) ‘In that species, algal endosymbionts occur in both the mantle and gills.’
  • 54) ‘A bundle of giant nerve fibres tied to the mantle give them very rapid reflexes.’
  • 55) ‘That's the way it had been for over four hundred years, the mantle passing from father to son, the reason lost somewhere in time.’
  • 56) ‘Now that Bob Hope is no longer available to make surprise walk-ons, I think the mantle should be passed on to Stan.’
  • 57) ‘That way, goes one theory, the PM can pass his mantle on to the stronger man.’
  • 58) ‘He won't say it, but he's probably ready to pass the mantle at some point.’
  • 59) ‘From what he told me, his grandfather passed the mantle onto him years ago.’
  • 60) ‘In subtle and not-so-subtle ways the mantle was passed from one generation to another.’
  • 61) ‘It is not easy to calibrate his success but it stirs a seamless passion in those now ready to take on the mantle.’
  • 62) ‘We have tried and tried again at picking up the mantles of authority only to find them alternately too big and too small.’
  • 63) ‘On reflection it seems that the sands of time are beginning to catch up on the ageing stars, while some of the young tigers seem to be finding it hard to assume the mantle of leaders.’
  • 64) ‘The historic achievement that they are chasing is the mantle of being the first ever Waterford club to be crowned as Munster Club football champions.’
  • 65) ‘That will be a slower process: whoever picks up the mantle of Chinese leadership, he will not be a democrat, nor one reconciled to US domination.’
  • 66) ‘Of course, this was the late 1960s and Laura had yet to marry a man named George and take up the mantle of First Lady of the United States of America.’
  • 67) ‘But by running for and taking the mantle of chief justice, Moore accepted the code of ethics that came with the job.’
  • 68) ‘It remains to be seen after May's parish council elections who will be willing take on the mantle of chairman and continue with the next stage of the transformation.’
  • 69) ‘He just happens to be a man among men - the mantle of leadership thrust upon his humble shoulders and dragged to new heights.’
  • 70) ‘There she very quickly adopted the mantle of the Queen Mum, the nation's favourite grandmother - and to hang with the cost.’
  • 71) ‘So, I have taken on the mantle of cook, which is fine - I like cooking.’
  • 72) ‘Within a superb trio of opening tracks, he takes on the mantle of Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and 1999-era Prince.’
  • 73) ‘And of course you're handing on the mantle to your son, are you not, so you're keeping it in the family.’
  • 74) ‘It was intended that the mantle should fall on to a nephew who was brought into the firm just before the Second World War but he died in his early forties in 1959.’
  • 75) ‘Even so, it took another 20 years or so before electric lights had largely replaced gas mantles in American homes.’
  • 76) ‘The incandescent gas mantle, developed by the German von Welsbach in 1885, greatly increased illuminating power and for a time helped fight off competition from electric lighting.’
  • 77) ‘The rare earths once had a valuable function in gas mantles and lighter flints.’
  • 78) ‘There was no electric in the house only gas, so the house had a gas mantle in each room and a small fire place.’
  • 79) ‘Since gas mantles made with thorium are radioactive, their use has been phased out.’
  • 80) ‘Earthquake waves travel slowly through the hotter regions of the mantle and speed up in colder, denser areas.’
  • 81) ‘Because it is less dense than the surrounding mantle, the magma rises toward the surface.’
  • 82) ‘Hot new ocean crust forms at midocean ridges, cools, and sinks back into the mantle, shedding heat and driving the plates.’
  • 83) ‘No one is ever likely to get a direct sample of material from the fiery mantle itself.’
  • 84) ‘The build-up of heat under the mantle initiates, at some point, the formation of convection.’
  • 85) ‘The other airily swings his torches of love, their flames mantling a cloud on which Jupiter's eagle fierily reposes.’
  • 86) ‘However, sediment drifts mantle the western margins, and slope fans locally encroach onto the rise of the eastern margin.’
  • 87) ‘Sunset had mantled the horizon with primrose, so that the evening sky blended with the garden, but there was still enough light to show him he wasn't the only one to flee the massed family.’
  • 88) ‘Sunlight sparkled on the snow mantling the trees, while deep drifts, their hollows moulded with blue shadow, were draped between the trees like sculpture.’
  • 89) ‘But there is also a beauty of expression that mantles the whole work.’
  • 90) ‘A moment of historical awareness would mantle his cheeks with a blush of shame.’
  • 91) ‘He lowered his arm slowly, cautiously, extending it well away from him, and the bird mantled as it shifted its weight to balance on his wrist.’
  • 92) ‘She arched her back, mantling her wings threateningly as she stalked to stand in front of her rescuer.’
  • 93) ‘Low growls of warning were echoing from the throats of the wolves while the raptors mantled their wings and hissed in agitation.’
  • 94) ‘This rabbit has no time to squeal, for Freya has it, and is mantling it, sheltering it beneath widespread wings, even her black tail feathers, with their white base and band, spread apart to hide it from our gaze.’

Examples

  • 1) Thinking of clues, I glanced at the congratulations card on my mantel.
  • 2) She tried to read my congrats card without actually touching it, by resting her chin on the edge of the mantel.
  • 3) The bookshelves are packed with stuffed animals and books, and the mantel is lined with photographs of the children who live here.
  • 4) mantel: The fireplace mantel is a very prominent location for displaying your village, as long as your collection is not too extensive and would force the overcrowding of your favorite pieces in to what can be a narrow and overall restricted space.
  • 5) The border of the Virgin's mantel is carved to resemble brocade and painted gold, while the inside has been painted red.
  • 6) A Gold Glove on his mantel is proof he can field as well as hit.
  • 7) The exquisite white marble mantel is Italian, not French, of the time of Louis XVI.
  • 8) Prominently placed on the mantel were his Emmy awards along with his favorite photographs of our children.
  • 9) In the centre of the mantel was a stuffed bird-of-paradise, while about the room were scattered gorgeous shells from the southern seas, delicate sprays of coral sprouting from barnacled pi-pi shells and cased in glass, assegais from South Africa, stone axes from New Guinea, huge
  • 10) ‘Grouped on window sills or mantels, in forcing jars of crystal, cobalt, amethyst or green-colored glass, hyacinths enhance the holiday mood.’
  • 11) ‘In addition, the house features cast-concrete counters, sinks, wall tiles, mantels, windowsills, and patio tiles that Rosenblatt designed and cast on site.’
  • 12) ‘Group them under your tree, on mantels, and on windowsills.’
  • 13) ‘The thirteen marble fireplaces all remained, as did the gas jets over the parlor mantels and near the windows.’
  • 14) ‘The foyer, mantels and windowsills become stages for her holiday creations.’
  • 15) ‘The fireplaces in the library and the drawing room have ornate wooden mantels with marble surrounds and are complemented by south - facing bay windows.’
  • 16) ‘The show (the first of five summer bazaars) also offers the opportunity to buy real art for barren walls and empty mantels.’
  • 17) ‘The apartment is filled with beautiful art and pottery and various marble mantels and fireplaces which the owner has made (he restores sculpture).’
  • 18) ‘This was one of my favorite paintings in the show, and I spent a lot of time staring at it where it was hung over one of the fireplace mantels.’
  • 19) ‘The rooms are laid out as if the occupants have just stepped out for a moment, leaving their tea, or port, or pipe, or whatever on tables and mantels.’
  • 20) ‘Large pieces of artwork are best hung over fireplace mantels or large pieces of furniture.’
  • 21) ‘Indian slate makes this fireplace, with its hand-crafted mantel, a particularly inviting feature of the room.’
  • 22) ‘Most of the people I work with haven't been nominated, don't have a statue on their mantel, and they're fine actors.’
  • 23) ‘Gwyneth placed it in a frame on the mantel in her room.’
  • 24) ‘We've also given you the choice of two design options, a simpler mantel and one that's more elaborate.’
  • 25) ‘The fireplace has a mantel and hearth incorporating a copper insert and remote-control living flame gas fire.’
  • 26) ‘People opt for one fairly lush plant and place it off-centre on their mantel, rather than filling a whole shelf with plants.’
  • 27) ‘Often this will be a painting or wall hanging that is placed on the wall just above the mantel, or even resting on the mantel.’
  • 28) ‘By the second quarter of the century, dwellings in Paris flaunted brilliant crystal chandeliers and small, exquisitely carved marble mantels with large mirror panels, or painted overmantels called trumeaus.’
  • 29) ‘Included in the show are table covers, needlework patterns, needle worked fire screens, valances for mantels and beds, needlework upholstery, and sewing tools.’
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