knight vs night

knight night

Definitions

  • 1) A warrior, especially of the Middle Ages.
  • 2) chess A chess piece, often in the shape of a horse's head, that is moved two squares in one direction and one at right angles to that direction in a single move, leaping over any intervening pieces.
  • 3) Nowadays, a person on whom a knighthood has been conferred by a monarch.
  • 4) A man holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
  • 5) A defender, champion, or zealous upholder of a cause or principle.
  • 6) A medieval gentleman-soldier, usually high-born, raised by a sovereign to privileged military status after training as a page and squire.
  • 7) Games A chess piece, usually in the shape of a horse's head, that can be moved two squares along a rank and one along a file or two squares along a file and one along a rank. The knight is the only piece that can jump other pieces to land on an open square.
  • 8) A man belonging to an order or brotherhood.
  • 9) The devoted champion of a lady.
  • 10) A medieval tenant giving military service as a mounted man-at-arms to a feudal landholder.
  • 11) in England, one of the representatives of a county in Parliament, in distinction from the representatives of cities and boroughs.
  • 12) [U. S.] a secret organization whose professed purpose is to secure and maintain the rights of workingmen as respects their relations to their employers.
  • 13) A piece used in the game of chess, usually bearing a horse's head.
  • 14) different classes of the Order of the Bath.
  • 15) See Chevalier d'industrie, under Chevalier.
  • 16) obsolete A young servant or follower; a military attendant.
  • 17) engraving One on whom knighthood, a dignity next below that of baronet, is conferred by the sovereign, entitling him to be addressed as Sir; as, Sir John.
  • 18) A champion; a partisan; a lover.
  • 19) See under Carpet.
  • 20) a secret order, founded in Washington, D. C., in 1864, for social and charitable purposes.
  • 21) See Hospitaler.
  • 22) obsolete A playing card bearing the figure of a knight; the knave or jack.
  • 23) engraving, engraving In feudal times, a man-at-arms serving on horseback and admitted to a certain military rank with special ceremonies, including an oath to protect the distressed, maintain the right, and live a stainless life.
  • 24) knights belonging to an order which, according to the legendary accounts, was instituted by the mythical King Arthur. They derived their common title from the table around which they sat on certain solemn days.
  • 25) one who gained his living by giving false evidence on trials, or false bail; hence, a sharper in general.
  • 26) originally a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalry; today in Great Britain a person honored by the sovereign for personal merit
  • 27) a chessman shaped to resemble the head of a horse; can move two squares horizontally and one vertically (or vice versa)
  • 28) In Great Britain in modern times, a man upon whom a certain honorary dignity has been conferred by a sovereign as a reward of personal merit of some kind, without reference to birth or possessions, and in no way involving military service, which disappeared as a feature of knighthood with the other institutions of chivalry.
  • 29) In card-playing, the knave or jack. Abbreviated knt., or in combination K. (as K. G., Knight of the Garter; K. C. B., Knight Commander of the Bath).
  • 30) A boy; a youth; a young man.
  • 31) One of the pieces in the game of chess, having usually the figure of a horse's head.
  • 32) An attendant or servant; especially, a military attendant; a man-at-arms; a soldier.
  • 33) Specifically In Europe during the middle ages, a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalry, first as page and afterward as squire to the sovereign, or to some earl, baron, or other superior lord, to whom he attached himself, and whom he was bound to follow to war on horseback.
  • 34) A branch of the fraternity of Freemasons in the United states, with an organization based upon that of the medieval order of the same name.
  • 35) A champion; a warrior; especially, a champion devoted to the service of another; a defender.
  • 36) chess, transitive To promote (a pawn) to a knight.
  • 37) transitive To confer knighthood upon.
  • 38) raise (someone) to knighthood
  • 39) To dub or create a knight; confer the honor of knighthood upon. The ceremony is regularly performed by touching the person on whom the dignity is conferred with a sword as he kneels. See accolade, 1.
  • 40) To raise (a person) to knighthood.
  • 41) To dub or create (one) a knight; -- done in England by the sovereign only, who taps the kneeling candidate with a sword, saying: Rise, Sir ---.

Definitions

  • 1) One's sleep during this period.
  • 2) This period considered as a unit of time.
  • 3) Nightfall.
  • 4) Darkness.
  • 5) The period between bedtime and morning.
  • 6) The period between dusk and midnight of a given day.
  • 7) This period set aside for a specific purpose.
  • 8) The period between evening and bedtime.
  • 9) The period between sunset and sunrise, especially the hours of darkness.
  • 10) A time or condition of gloom, obscurity, ignorance, or despair.
  • 11) This period considered from its conditions.
  • 12) A time or condition marked by absence of moral or ethical values.
  • 13) This period considered from its activities.
  • 14) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night of sorrow.
  • 15) a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  • 16) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems to sleep.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) the nightjar.
  • 18) The period after the close of life; death.
  • 19) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
  • 20) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  • 21) That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  • 22) a cart used to remove the contents of privies by night.
  • 23) a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by poachers.
  • 24) (Zoöl.) any creature that flies in the night, as some birds and insects.
  • 25) (Zoöl.) The Manx shearwater (Puffinus Anglorum).
  • 26) (Med.) See Hemeralopia.
  • 27) nightly; many nights.
  • 28) iodine green.
  • 29) a bird that cries in the night.
  • 30) a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
  • 31) (Zoöl.) an American bird (Chordeiles Virginianus), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel.
  • 32) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
  • 33) Figuratively, a state or time of darkness, depression, misfortune, or the like.
  • 34) The darkness of death or the grave.
  • 35) A time of sadness or sorrow; a dreary period.
  • 36) The dark half of the day; that part of the complete day during which the sun is below the horizon; the time from sunset to sunrise. See day.
  • 37) Evening; nightfall; the end of the day: as, he came home at night.
  • 38) Of or relating to the night.
  • 39) Active chiefly at night.
  • 40) Occurring after dark.
  • 41) Intended for use at night.
  • 42) Working during the night.

Examples

  • 1) The white rook and knight have wandered far away from the defence of the king.
  • 2) An easier option would be to hold out for a white knight, but that would require yet another costly restructuring.
  • 3) The 71-year-old new knight of the realm has one of music's most impressive back catalogues.
  • 4) He was friendly and pretended to make a knight's move on one of mum's designer boards for the local press.
  • 5) The king and the knight still have moves left.
  • 6) What a comeback from the knight of the realm.
  • 7) Two medieval knights stand under an orange umbrella.
  • 8) Who is his knight in shining armour?
  • 9) The one knight who led them bade them stand and hold their shields up into a wall.
  • 10) Potential white knights would then be offered some further limited financial backing.
  • 11) Three times as many men are knighted as women are named a dame.
  • 12) Hence he protects his knight with his king.
  • 13) Now many of them are knights of the realm.
  • 14) Medieval knights are supposed to have put tokens there.
  • 15) knights in armour fly in on wires.
  • 16) We're not presenting ourselves as knights on white horses.
  • 17) Or perhaps we should see the show as masochistic on the part of noble culinary knight Roux.
  • 18) I have replaced this with a white knight, which makes no difference to the solution.
  • 19) "What!" cried Helen, starting, "you think this knight is the royal Bruce?"
  • 20) The superb disdain with which she met the project frightened these poor people, who were not mistaken in their fears that she was meditating what they called knight-errantry.
  • 21) A 'knight' is a Christian artifact from a Christian culture just as much as a 'Kirtle Friar' is.
  • 22) Wallace returned a gracious reply to this speech; and turning to Bruce, said, "This knight is my friend; and though from peculiar circumstances neither of us choose to disclose our names during our journey, yet, whatever they may be, I trust you will confide in the word of one whom you have honored by the address you have now made, and believe that his friend is not unworthy the hospitalities of him who was once king of Scots."
  • 23) Illinois: The race between Rep. Mark Kirk (R) and state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias (D) reminds us of that great scene in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" where the black knight is grievously wounded time and again but comes back for more.
  • 24) Although you may not see it in the movies every true Jedi knight is required to build their own Lightsaber.
  • 25) The imagery of the black knight is an archetype, already ingrained in our minds.
  • 26) One Word, Fanboys, they have compiled a list containing every comic book movie even remotely considered good, batman begins, 300, vfor vendetta, x-men and The dark knight is understandable, they should by all means be in a great movies list but spider-man and superman returns, come on.
  • 27) The queen drifted across the board and landed, covering the white knight from a distance and effectively cutting off its offensive.
  • 28) It turns out this dark knight is a personification of the devil, who corrupts Bertram.
  • 29) ‘The crossbow was really the first hand-held weapon that could be used by an untrained soldier to injure or kill a knight in plate armour.’
  • 30) ‘In 1118 he invaded Egypt, with a tiny army of only 216 knights and 400 foot soldiers.’
  • 31) ‘The primary service was military duty as a mounted knight.’
  • 32) ‘Heraldry originated in medieval warfare and tournaments when it was necessary to identify knights who were completely covered in armour.’
  • 33) ‘At Crécy they decisively repulsed a mounted charge by French knights.’
  • 34) ‘The feudal system meant that knights had to provide the king with soldiers when the king demanded them.’
  • 35) ‘By November, Godfrey could command only about three hundred knights and a few thousand foot soldiers.’
  • 36) ‘Few castles can boast the historic pedigree of Cathcart, which dates back to the days of Sir Alan Cathcart, a knight who served with Robert the Bruce.’
  • 37) ‘The barons mobilized every man they could and put six hundred knights into the field.’
  • 38) ‘The Earl of Salisbury and almost all of the English knights were killed.’
  • 39) ‘Usually, a minor knight might hold a few acres from a baron, who in turn held the land from a count or earl, who in turn held large tracts of the king.’
  • 40) ‘The count of that land, Theobald, hosted a grand event that was attended by knights from all over northern France.’
  • 41) ‘When they rode past their king, knights raised their visors to identify themselves.’
  • 42) ‘In times past, teenagers could lead armies in battle and young pages could be made knights as early as age 12.’
  • 43) ‘The military orders, and the knights under King John put up a valiant defense and saved what they could of the army.’
  • 44) ‘The Order of the knights Templar was formed during the crusades when many knights and squires set out for the Holy Land.’
  • 45) ‘The land taken - and taken is the word - by the Anglo-Normans, was divided up in the usual way and given to their knights, as reward for military service.’
  • 46) ‘These were made up of ‘feudal’ levies, in which the knight owed service to his lord in return for land.’
  • 47) ‘This was true of knights, nobles and princes - all ranks of the feudal aristocracy produced younger sons prepared to maintain rank through military force.’
  • 48) ‘Pages helped arm and maintain the knights of medieval Europe, while drummer boys were a requisite part of any 18th century army.’
  • 49) ‘This permanent body of knights, squires and other laymen was now more often centred on the chamber, the more private space around the ruler, rather than the large communal hall.’
  • 50) ‘England's wars, waged successfully by humble bowmen as well as knights and noblemen, created among all ranks a self-confidence that warmed English hearts.’
  • 51) ‘In return for this, William generously made the great English earl a Norman knight.’
  • 52) ‘Cumberland, like the other counties, sent two knights of the shire to Parliament.’
  • 53) ‘The sort of men who got themselves chosen to be knights of the shire in the late thirteenth century were exactly the sort of men who always had attended the great political assemblies.’
  • 54) ‘He was knight of the shire for Kent in 1386 and probably lived in Kent for most of the rest of his life.’
  • 55) ‘In the 13th cent., however, this became the responsibility of each sheriff and two knights of the shire.’
  • 56) ‘He would become her knight and devote himself to her service, though his passion for her would rarely be consummated.’
  • 57) ‘In other words, the colors red and white seem to represent the knight and his female beloved, respectively.’
  • 58) ‘He was offering himself as my protector, my knight, and it moved me deeply.’
  • 59) ‘In one of Chaucer's earliest poems, The Book of the Duchess, a knight is overheard in the forest lamenting the death of his lady.’
  • 60) ‘Counts, knights, barons and marquesses gathered in the guilded ballroom of the hotel to mark the focal event of the aristocratic social calendar.’
  • 61) ‘In 1925 Asquith accepted a peerage as Earl of Oxford and Asquith and was created a knight of the garter shortly afterwards.’
  • 62) ‘The order became defunct with the death of its last knight, HRH The Duke of Gloucester, in 1974.’
  • 63) ‘Leading the North Yorkshire awards in the Queen's Birthday Honours list, published today, is the county's newest knight, Sir Robert Ogden.’
  • 64) ‘Top tip for Birthday Honours - Timothy West will become a knight of the realm.’
  • 65) ‘In chess, if you move your knight on to a pawn's square, the pawn's a goner.’
  • 66) ‘Indeed, the knight is the only chess piece that covers an asymmetrical pattern of squares.’
  • 67) ‘The next day we see one grandmaster leaving a knight unprotected and another thrusting his pawn to a sure death.’
  • 68) ‘He moved his knight forward and deftly captured one of her pawns.’
  • 69) ‘Jerome rubbed his chin, and after a few minutes of thought, moved his knight, capturing Adam's last bishop.’
  • 70) ‘He was knighted in 2003 for services to public life in Scotland.’
  • 71) ‘He was knighted in 1979 for services to disabled people and died in 1982.’
  • 72) ‘He was knighted for services to nursing and the NHS in the Queen's Birthday Honours last year.’
  • 73) ‘She turned the school around and in 2001 she was knighted for her services to education.’
  • 74) ‘The Queen knighted him in 1988 as a reward for his long service to her.’
  • 75) ‘Somerset's early career was in Wolsey's service and he was knighted in France in 1523.’
  • 76) ‘Wilkie became an associate and then a member of the Royal Academy while very young; he was knighted and made a painter to the King.’
  • 77) ‘But it was for his successful plundering of Spanish merchant ships that he was knighted.’
  • 78) ‘In 1983 he married a daughter of the Duke of Norfolk and he was knighted in 1993.’
  • 79) ‘In 1942 he was knighted, no doubt partly due to his heroic service to his country during both wars.’
  • 80) ‘He was knighted for this work in 1911, but was forced to retire from foreign service due to adverse affects of the tropics on his health.’
  • 81) ‘He received numerous honours, including the OBE in 1961, and he was knighted in 1974.’
  • 82) ‘Lean was nominated for Oscars for directing, adapting and editing the film, and in June 1984 he was knighted.’
  • 83) ‘He was knighted in 1671 by Charles II, and lies buried in the church of St Peter Mancroft, Norwich.’
  • 84) ‘A founder member of the National Portrait Society in 1911, he was knighted in 1936.’
  • 85) ‘Norman Wisdom proved he had earned a place in the nation's heart after being knighted by the Queen at Buckingham Palace.’
  • 86) ‘His many supporters cannot understand why he has not been knighted.’
  • 87) ‘Sir Howard was knighted last year, largely for helping bring the Commonwealth Games to Manchester.’
  • 88) ‘He is the only Australian to have been knighted for services to cricket.’
  • 89) ‘Both Hillary and Hunt were knighted by the queen following the expedition.’

Examples

  • 1) Two of the wounded were critical last night.
  • 2) She lost a lot of people that night.
  • 3) Take one before bed each night for the best results.
  • 4) The daylight faded fast and it grew dark as night.
  • 5) We ended up having dinner that night and the two nights that followed.
  • 6) Might he wrestle back control on election night?
  • 7) That failing was all too evident at times last night, especially in a fraught opening spell.
  • 8) And it was roundly condemned from all quarters last night.
  • 9) Tens of thousands of people spent last night sleeping rough.
  • 10) Standard rental periods and extra night option fees apply.
  • 11) My parents listen to the radio in bed at night.
  • 12) The dark night of the soul is his speciality.
  • 13) Would you like to bring your beautiful wife to dinner one night?
  • 14) Here at least we can go to sleep at night.
  • 15) They have already waited for five months since election night.
  • 16) At night my bed and pillow are soaked with tears.
  • 17) It was a dark and stormy night.
  • 18) We went out for dinner the other night.
  • 19) She spent part of the night tending to bleeding soldiers by torch light in a fi eld tent.
  • 20) Heathrow is preparing to ban night flights as part of reforms designed to boost its bid to build a third runway.
  • 21) We neither of us slept last night after having completed it; and small wonder.
  • 22) You wonder how those people slept at night for 23 years.
  • 23) Normal membership conditions, standard rental periods and extra night option fees apply.
  • 24) Now get a good night's sleep.
  • 25) ‘At night the sky had been swept clean of clouds and the stars were blazing in the moonless night.’
  • 26) ‘She loved starry nights, sunrises and sunsets, the moon, snow… her list could go on and on.’
  • 27) ‘She loved going in there at night, especially on nights that the moon was full and shining brightly through the glass sun room.’
  • 28) ‘Sam hated to drive at night, especially a night such as this when it was cold and windy.’
  • 29) ‘A blackout at night might seem strange especially when the consumption of electricity during nights is half of the total national electricity production.’
  • 30) ‘They are allowed outside in a pen during the day, but at night they are put inside with an arc heater to increase their chance of survival during the colder nights.’
  • 31) ‘If the problem exists only at night, a medicine to reduce the volume of urine in the night is prescribed.’
  • 32) ‘At night they are beautiful, illuminating as they do the splendour of the area.’
  • 33) ‘At night, whole streets are kept awake by sirens which are just as loud as car horns, but unlike car horns they are not illegal.’
  • 34) ‘At night it will glow bright white and it will look quite beautiful.’
  • 35) ‘At night, this normally meek youth disturbed his fellow novices with violent ravings in his nightmares.’
  • 36) ‘At night the convicts either slept in their seats or, if they were lucky, bunked down at a county jail en route.’
  • 37) ‘At night, down on the water, they seem just beyond grasp, unreachably distant, like the past itself.’
  • 38) ‘At night no one's talking to anyone; people make noise because there is no one to listen.’
  • 39) ‘At night, the nine slept by four separate campfires, divided along gender and age lines.’
  • 40) ‘At night, the moonlight that came through the doors was fantastic and mysterious.’
  • 41) ‘At night, I was awakened by the piercing wind and burrowed under the quilt to escape the cold.’
  • 42) ‘He says he has been unable to sleep at night and has been prescribed sleeping tablets by the doctor to help get through the night.’
  • 43) ‘At night he sleeps in warehouses or under trees, no doubt worrying how he will manage to feed his children on such a paltry sum.’
  • 44) ‘At night, the residents retired to the few cellars that had not been destroyed by a decade of war.’
  • 45) ‘Flights and self-catering accommodation for seven nights costs €400 per person sharing.’
  • 46) ‘Prices are per person for two nights' bed and breakfast with dinner on the first night, based on two people sharing a double room.’
  • 47) ‘My June break cost from £90 per person for two nights, bed, breakfast and evening meal.’
  • 48) ‘Rooms cost €65 per person for two nights bed and breakfast throughout the autumn.’
  • 49) ‘For example, the estimated time limit could be set at five days and the cost per night at £200.’
  • 50) ‘The cost is 5 per night per person but the school has shouldered the bulk of the costs.’
  • 51) ‘Rates: $400 per person for four nights, which includes three days of lift tickets and enormous breakfasts.’
  • 52) ‘Prices start at just £455 per person for seven nights accommodation in a twin room on a half-board basis, including direct flights and transfers.’
  • 53) ‘With prices starting at £209 per person for seven nights' accommodation you cannot afford to miss this offer.’
  • 54) ‘The package for three nights and seven days costs Rs.21,999 per person on twin sharing basis, including the stay in a four star hotel.’
  • 55) ‘These prices are per room per night and include dinner and breakfast for two people.’
  • 56) ‘Self-catering cottages for two nights cost from €139 per cottage.’
  • 57) ‘The total cost of three nights accommodation and return flights is €710 per person, based on two people in single occupancy rooms.’
  • 58) ‘A run with an upscale private cabin for two nights costs about $230 per person.’
  • 59) ‘A package including return flights and two nights ' accommodation costs €495 per person.’
  • 60) ‘The cost for adults is 12 for four nights and 2 for teenagers per night.’
  • 61) ‘Prices start at £185 per night for a suite with a Chelsea view, based on one or two people sharing.’
  • 62) ‘Rates start at £196 per person per night, for a standard room with two people sharing.’
  • 63) ‘It makes perfect sense: a one-bed or studio flat is considerably cheaper per night than a hotel.’
  • 64) ‘The trip, including flight and five nights in the Hotel Solitude, costs 570 per person.’
  • 65) ‘Into the web we went, deeper and deeper into the night and into the darkness of the maze.’
  • 66) ‘Last night's Eastern Evening News has predicted that I will win North Norfolk.’
  • 67) ‘Last night at dinner my Mother was talking about her arrangements to go down to Cork on Tuesday.’
  • 68) ‘On Friday night Chris approached us to do a skit for all the delegates after dinner on the last night.’
  • 69) ‘Last night we went for dinner with our host for the day, Henny, in Noordwijk.’
  • 70) ‘Last night was a quiet night in, just me and a few glasses of nice whiskey.’
  • 71) ‘Last night she ate her dinner and she gobbled five peppermints right out of my hand.’
  • 72) ‘She hadn't stayed up as late as she had last night since the night she met Christopher.’
  • 73) ‘Last night ended up being one of the happiest nights of my life.’
  • 74) ‘Last night I went out for a dinner that was both lovely and very very strange.’
  • 75) ‘Last night we went to East Berlin to have dinner and to tramp around some of the bars.’
  • 76) ‘Single parents were given the evening off last night while their kids did a spot of Christmas shopping.’
  • 77) ‘The three party leaders spoke with one voice in the Evening Press last night.’
  • 78) ‘We got to put all this domestic bliss into practice last night with a great evening.’
  • 79) ‘There was discussion of going to the pub, but like last night we were stuffed and tired, so decided on early nights instead.’
  • 80) ‘Of course, after a lot of late nights in a row, and with the flat so hot, there was little chance of me getting to sleep early last night.’
  • 81) ‘Last night again, the fight ended in favour of the man from Edinburgh.’
  • 82) ‘Last night, some parents said they were dismayed at the latest hike in fees which far outweighs yearly salary rises.’
  • 83) ‘Last night, my friend would not allow his wife and a female friend to go down to their outside garage on their own.’
  • 84) ‘Last night, I uttered five words, got up from my place at the table and left the restaurant without looking back.’
  • 85) ‘Last night, in a fit of pique, just to show me up for a liar, she took her first steps with the cane.’
  • 86) ‘Mr Ewing said people in the community had already organised a large number of fundraising events including quiz nights, a pantomime and concerts.’
  • 87) ‘The Parent Staff Friends Association began fundraising two years ago with events such as quiz nights, a dance and a Christmas fair.’
  • 88) ‘The next event is a quiz night on Friday at the Ramsey Memorial Hall, with tickets already selling fast.’
  • 89) ‘Parents whose teenage children want to enjoy a popular night out will find buying tickets to the event easier from now on.’
  • 90) ‘We also intend to organize some social activities for example a Christmas night out.’
  • 91) ‘The evening is an absorbing night out and one not to be lightly ignored.’
  • 92) ‘This is a always a fun night out so come along and enjoy the quiz and support the school fund.’
  • 93) ‘For the younger generation the Mardi Gras on Saturday night was their night out.’
  • 94) ‘Her ordeal began early on Friday morning after a night out in Marmaris.’
  • 95) ‘It sounds more like a night in than a night out, but this is dining out Moroccan style.’
  • 96) ‘But I do hope they are still happy to be seen in public together, enjoying dinner or a night out.’
  • 97) ‘Saturday night is the big night out, but we all plan to go into the city first of all for some dinner.’
  • 98) ‘It is hoped to reach the appeal target by the end of 2004 and other events include wine and cheese evenings, quiz nights, a parish fun day and an outdoor play.’
  • 99) ‘This night out is then followed the following evening by Martin's birthday drinks down in Soho.’
  • 100) ‘The evening promises to be a great night out that helps raise money for a worthy cause.’
  • 101) ‘The restaurant has a cosy and relaxing feel to it, and the subtle lighting and candles make it ideal for a romantic night out.’
  • 102) ‘Patrons can place their bets in the bar and in the lounge on the night, so come along and enjoy a fun night out.’
  • 103) ‘These types of smoker can get through a packet or two in a single night but then won't smoke until their next night out.’
  • 104) ‘She was reported missing by her parents on Saturday morning after she failed to return from a night out.’
  • 105) ‘But at night he drove round searching for vulnerable women wanting cabs home after nights out in Manchester.’
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