human vs humane

human humane

Definitions

  • 1) A human being, whether man, woman or child.
  • 2) A person.
  • 3) A member of the primate genus Homo, especially a member of the species Homo sapiens, distinguished from other apes by a large brain and the capacity for speech.
  • 4) colloq. A human being.
  • 5) colloq. A human being.
  • 6) any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
  • 7) A human being; a member of the family of mankind.
  • 8) Mars, Mars (said he), thou plague of men, smear'd with the dust and bloud
  • 9) Of or belonging to the species Homo sapiens or its closest relatives.
  • 10) comparable Having the nature or attributes of a human being.
  • 11) comparable Having the nature or attributes of a human being.
  • 12) Subject to or indicative of the weaknesses, imperfections, and fragility associated with humans.
  • 13) Of, relating to, or characteristic of humans.
  • 14) Made up of humans.
  • 15) Having the form of a human.
  • 16) Having or showing those positive aspects of nature and character regarded as distinguishing humans from other animals.
  • 17) Belonging to man or mankind; having the qualities or attributes of a man; of or pertaining to man or to the race of man
  • 18) characteristic of humanity
  • 19) having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings
  • 20) relating to a person
  • 21) Pertaining to the sphere, nature, or faculties of man; relative or proper to mankind; mundane; secular; not divine: as, human knowledge, wisdom, or science; human affairs.
  • 22) In geology, noting the period of the later beds of the Post-tertiary or Quaternary series (the recent, alluvial, and post-glacial periods).
  • 23) In astrology, a sign of the zodiac corresponding to a constellation having for its figure a human being. The human signs are Gemini, Virgo, Aquarius, and the first half of Sagittarius. Synonyms Human, etc. See humane.
  • 24) Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of man or of mankind; having the qualities or attributes of man: as, human life or nature; a human being; human shape.

Definitions

  • 1) Pertaining to branches of learning concerned with human affairs or the humanities, especially classical literature or rhetoric.
  • 2) Obsolete spelling of human.
  • 3) Having or showing concern for the pain or suffering of another; compassionate.
  • 4) Characterized by kindness, mercy, or compassion.
  • 5) Characterized by an emphasis on humanistic values and concerns.
  • 6) obsolete Pertaining to man; human.
  • 7) Humanizing; exalting; tending to refine.
  • 8) obsolete Pertaining to man; human.
  • 9) Having the feelings and inclinations creditable to man; having a disposition to treat other human beings or animals with kindness; kind; benevolent.
  • 10) pertaining to or concerned with the humanities
  • 11) marked or motivated by concern with the alleviation of suffering
  • 12) showing evidence of moral and intellectual advancement
  • 13) Profane; secular. See human, a., 2.
  • 14) Of or pertaining to man; human. See human, a.
  • 15) Synonyms Humane, Merciful; tender, tender-hearted, kind-hearted, compassionate, sympathetic. Humane differs from the ordinary use of merciful in that it expresses active endeavors to find and relieve suffering, and especially to prevent it, while merciful expresses the disposition to spare one the suffering which might be inflicted. The good Samaritan was humane; Shylock should have been merciful; the Royal Humane Society; a merciful judge.
  • 16) Having the feelings and inclinations proper to man; having tenderness, compassion, and a disposition to treat other human beings and the lower animals with kindness; kind; benevolent.
  • 17) Tending to humanize or refine: applied to the elegant or polite branches of literature, especially philology, rhetoric, poetry, and the study of the ancient classics. See humanity, 5.

Examples

  • 1) With such a respect for human life and a sense of moral decency.
  • 2) In court they said he has human rights but what about my rights?
  • 3) This is an alternative universe where computer programs have human form.
  • 4) WOULDN'T it be great if humans were like cars?
  • 5) But humans are much more variable than that.
  • 6) But people are humans and they recognise human emotion and pain.
  • 7) Where and how do you fit into the human race?
  • 8) The progressive agenda is all about changing the world and human nature to accord with a preferred model of existence.
  • 9) This is an artist who transforms the human body into a forum for critique.
  • 10) Much in human life is given to looking forward in imagination or to looking back in memory.
  • 11) The expanding human race is another factor.
  • 12) They wanted only to live as natural human beings in harmony with life.
  • 13) You can treat humans like they are human.
  • 14) To do so demands not just technology but human skill.
  • 15) So why do people leave human decency at the door when they check in online?
  • 16) Their plots are weird and the characters are symbolic rather than human.
  • 17) The hearts of humans and great apes are very much alike.
  • 18) Use of drones has been widely criticised by human rights campaigners.
  • 19) Your trouble is blamed on human error.
  • 20) There is untapped potential in the human body.
  • 21) For hours there was no sign of human life.
  • 22) The most natural human instinct in the face of peril is to fly.
  • 23) What would human beings be like if they used only signs?
  • 24) It was just human nature for us to be excited.
  • 25) The danger is that human nature could turn out to work in precisely the opposite way.
  • 26) That would have been brilliant if it had been played by a human player rather than a computer program.
  • 27) Labeld them as “human weeds” “reckless breeders” “spawning..human beings who never should have been born”.
  • 28) Labeld them as “human weeds” “reckless breeders” “spawning..human beings who never should have beenborn”.
  • 29) (The passage from Diogenes quoted in the previous section, according to which Pyrrho held “that human beings do everything by convention and habit” is not necessarily in conflict with this; by ˜human beings™ Pyrrho might have meant ordinary human beings, among whom he would not have included himself.)
  • 30) Oh wait, he didn't mean that the broad sweeping claims are that human CO2 causes global warming and or that the ulterior motives are political power, prestige and funding, which can only be attached to *human* caused warming.
  • 31) Once again see my much earlier comments re: Bicentennial man, if memory serves about why human and human+ AIs are less useful than they might seem.
  • 32) "How human, how lusciously _human_!" he exclaimed.
  • 33) It is from this point of observation that our humour is suddenly made aware of the startling absurdity of human institution; and not only of _human_ institution; for it is made aware also of the absurdity of the whole fantastic scheme of this portentous universe.
  • 34) If people do anything that is generally called "immoral," they will excuse themselves on the grounds of human nature; they will say: "After all, _human nature being what it is_, you must expect this, that and the other kind of licence and immorality"; and to say that morality, real morality, can only be based on the realities of human nature will therefore sound to many of you the wildest kind of paradox.
  • 35) Women, difficult as some people find it to believe, are human beings; and because women are so, they want work, and interest, and love -- both given and received -- and children, and, in short, the satisfaction of every _human_ need.
  • 36) NATURAL phenomenon of human life brings us to the scientifical source of ethics and I prove that the so-called “highest ideals of humanity” have nothing of “sentimentalism” or of the “_super_natural” in them, but are exclusively the _fulfilment_ of the _natural laws_ for the _human class of life_.
  • 37) ‘The human body and mind work according to the nature's laws, which are eternal, and immutable.’
  • 38) ‘There, among the babbling minds of the incompetent human race, was my beloved Farrell.’
  • 39) ‘It constantly amazes me how the minds of the human race in general work, or cease to work, as the case may be.’
  • 40) ‘The human body and mind are more flexible than engines and batteries.’
  • 41) ‘We need to have a much richer account of the way in which the human mind and body operate together in the complex activity we know as sex.’
  • 42) ‘Understanding this logic, they believed, might unlock our understanding of how the human mind works.’
  • 43) ‘This went so far that certain authors considered the human races to be different species.’
  • 44) ‘The Enlightenment assumes that knowledge is objective, good and accessible to the human mind.’
  • 45) ‘The human mind cannot tolerate the spectre of waste presented by the possibility of chicanery without detection.’
  • 46) ‘The slide show and the model of a human body facilitated better understanding.’
  • 47) ‘Similarly, it is irrational to consider undeveloped human bodies as if they were fully developed ones.’
  • 48) ‘Even in the most passive form, the energy requirements of a human body are considerable.’
  • 49) ‘This is rather my thoughts and feelings concerning what has happened and what we as a human race need to consider next.’
  • 50) ‘To understand my point, you first need to take a moment to consider the human body.’
  • 51) ‘Our understanding of how the human body was made up was now much more comprehensive.’
  • 52) ‘There are no simple formulae for understanding the human mind and how it develops.’
  • 53) ‘But I consider the human body to be more like the sensitive engine of a fine sports car.’
  • 54) ‘The next thing we need to understand is how the human race is meant to move forward towards these ideals.’
  • 55) ‘Galen had worked mainly on Barbary apes, considered closest to the human race.’
  • 56) ‘It is this characteristic of the human mind which makes an appeal to force necessary.’
  • 57) ‘Investigating the validity of animal experiments is therefore essential for both human health and animals.’
  • 58) ‘These nervous fluids often got the blame for human error and weakness.’
  • 59) ‘She depicts an almost saintly figure, virtually devoid of human weakness or error.’
  • 60) ‘And they may just demand it rather than trust their life in the air to a pilot who is susceptible to human error.’
  • 61) ‘Whether that problem resulted from human or machine error may never be known.’
  • 62) ‘It's time to look seriously at whether we really need politicians anyway, given their fallibility and human weakness.’
  • 63) ‘It never sends any emails, and it can infect vulnerable machines without any human help.’
  • 64) ‘The fact that we haven't done this yet is attributable to exactly two things: human weakness and corporate profits.’
  • 65) ‘A spokeswoman for Yorkshire Electricity said the mistake was down to human error and apologised for the blunder.’
  • 66) ‘The mistake Kinsey made was to assume that the human animal is purely animal.’
  • 67) ‘The accuracy of satellite-guided weapons has exposed human error as the weak link in the chain.’
  • 68) ‘Folktales relate the adventures of both animal protagonists and human characters.’
  • 69) ‘I do allow them to choose characters from fiction as long as that character is human and not animal.’
  • 70) ‘Its characters offer human frailties, weaknesses and moral dilemmas that draw us in.’
  • 71) ‘Ray played a video game once where one of the characters was more human than animal.’
  • 72) ‘That is all down to human error, and cannot be ascribed to the machines.’
  • 73) ‘We must re-examine all that we do and redesign our many and complex systems to make them less vulnerable to human error.’
  • 74) ‘The very nature of the disclosure process makes it prone to human error and vulnerable to attack.’
  • 75) ‘All of which just goes to show that such a venture is extremely vulnerable to vulgar human error.’
  • 76) ‘Personalising the machine is an ongoing human preoccupation.’
  • 77) ‘As a matter of fact, the lack of such human qualities as honesty, kindness, and public spirit are generally felt.’
  • 78) ‘Both sides trampled on each other's human qualities, so please don't use these saddening words.’
  • 79) ‘This was an India I had never known, where human kindness flowed freely and tradesmen greeted me with genuine warmth.’
  • 80) ‘I'd parallel, as Blatty does, human kindness/forgiveness with the existence of God.’
  • 81) ‘We will be closer to elucidating the basis of quintessentially human qualities like language and selfawareness.’
  • 82) ‘Genius, it turns out, is a human quality, drawing on the world and expanding with it.’
  • 83) ‘It seems that the left has so demonized him they can no longer see him as having any human qualities.’
  • 84) ‘His other works of varying scale all have the same unnerving human quality.’
  • 85) ‘An avuncular African doctor had the time to be reassuring and overflowing with human kindness.’
  • 86) ‘There was, and still is, a very human quality to it - good manners, civic pride and little acts of kindness.’
  • 87) ‘A certain lustiness, a certain appetite for the pleasures of life, is an attractive, human quality.’
  • 88) ‘It's the one truly redeeming human quality that runs through everything we do.’
  • 89) ‘Medical schools used to put clinical excellence at the top of the agenda, at the expense of human contact and kindness.’
  • 90) ‘Only as the strike nears defeat does his obstinacy acquire a more human, faintly heroic quality.’
  • 91) ‘Forget morality, kindness and other human virtues; just admire the size of the wad.’
  • 92) ‘He said it had given his dad back his faith in human kindness and after all that has happened, I feel that too.’
  • 93) ‘I think it's a very natural human quality to want to broaden out your experience.’
  • 94) ‘It's a pleasant show of human kindness in a time when all we seem to hear about is terrorism and violence.’
  • 95) ‘It is so refreshing to know that there are people who do abide by the codes of human kindness.’
  • 96) ‘The filmmaker has identified certain human qualities accurately enough, but makes too little of them.’
  • 97) ‘They say coyotes have in some places become habituated to humans and human environments.’
  • 98) ‘The forepaws resemble slender human hands and make the raccoon unusually dextrous.’
  • 99) ‘So far nearly all human cases of avian flu have resulted from direct contact with infected birds.’
  • 100) ‘Tubules in human mouths are sensitive to cold and are normally covered by enamel.’
  • 101) ‘Some have been known to nest in burial caves and may use human bones as nest material.’
  • 102) ‘Do you think the platypus has a placenta, as a human mother would have when she is pregnant?’
  • 103) ‘This commingling is seen by many reformers as a grotesque reduction to the base material level of human corporeality.’
  • 104) ‘They were a little too long to belong in a human mouth and far too sharp.’
  • 105) ‘The neatly piled human bones belonged to three individuals: a woman, a man and an adolescent aged about fifteen.’
  • 106) ‘They belonged to our human ancestors, who helped shape the common psychic heritage of us all.’
  • 107) ‘Well, Gray's Anatomy clearly shows your human proboscis with two nostrils.’
  • 108) ‘If a human male made sperm on a similar scale, they would be as long as a blue whale.’
  • 109) ‘High testosterone levels inhibit hair growth in human males and leads to male pattern baldness.’
  • 110) ‘They were predominantly human viruses that acquired some genes from an avian source.’
  • 111) ‘Other examples include pigments that produce the color in human hair and skin.’
  • 112) ‘The voice box structure seen in the Neandertal is identical to current human voice anatomy.’
  • 113) ‘One of the Americans found a few leg bones and freaked out so they told him it was a buffalo, but I could see it was a human femur and tibia.’
  • 114) ‘The bee's eyes, like those of other insects, differ greatly from human eyes.’
  • 115) ‘At about thirty years of age, the human skeleton is as heavy and strong as it will ever get.’
  • 116) ‘There are two different melanins found in human hair, eumelanin and pheomelanin.’
  • 117) ‘At least some people are realising that humans are completely abusing the right we have.’
  • 118) ‘I'm not meant to notice how Gail looks next to other people or how other humans treat her.’
  • 119) ‘You try to give them good stuff but these people are not fit to be called humans.’
  • 120) ‘I did not know about the details of the war, or all that humans are capable of doing to other humans.’
  • 121) ‘Those are the things humans most need to function, and we have placed them at the bottom of the list.’
  • 122) ‘Living in the world's warmer oceans, it feeds on plankton and is harmless to humans.’
  • 123) ‘This is probably one of the great shifts in the story of modern humans but we take it almost for granted.’
  • 124) ‘The first sweet treat that humans indulged in was most likely honey from beehives.’
  • 125) ‘How does knowing the ages of the humans involved have any relevance to the main point of the story?’
  • 126) ‘There is every reason to think that you would come across problems cloning humans.’
  • 127) ‘In those days, sailing solo meant a form of isolation that few humans could endure.’
  • 128) ‘But it can do so only to the extent that humans are determined to use it to those ends.’
  • 129) ‘If the natural environment is naturally subject to change then what about us humans?’
  • 130) ‘I can feed two humans and two cats for a day and still have change left over from the price of a bunch of flowers.’
  • 131) ‘In fact he probably treats them more as humans than a lot of companies treat their employees.’
  • 132) ‘The tsunami may be an act of nature but humans are complicating the relief effort.’
  • 133) ‘In this heroic period, he revealed a kit of talents which few humans have possessed.’
  • 134) ‘The disease could not be passed between humans and was easy to cure if caught early enough.’
  • 135) ‘Of the hundreds of different species of shark, only a few pose any real threat to humans.’

Examples

  • 1) There was something deeply right and humane about it.
  • 2) Was it not possible to construct a more humane society than this?
  • 3) Their humane treatment of debtors was also notable.
  • 4) Yet we deny people the right to die in a humane and dignified way.
  • 5) It is touching and funny and deeply humane.
  • 6) These are not the actions of a humane society.
  • 7) Off screen he campaigned for the humane treatment of dogs.
  • 8) Staff explained the manner in which they tried to carry out their duties in a humane way.
  • 9) Their misery was intolerable and it should be illegal in a humane society.
  • 10) He dismissed suggestions that the mutiny had been due to the "humane" treatment of prisoners.
  • 11) No humane society should allow it to continue.
  • 12) It is so brilliantly made and so deeply humane that you end up feeling better for having watched it.
  • 13) Surely these modern methods must be overlooked in favour of a more humane way of dealing with the problem.
  • 14) The most humane treatment is to expose the addict fully to the personal and family pain he is causing.
  • 15) He received a note from the defendant thanking him for the fair and humane treatment he had received in his court.
  • 16) It is so deeply humane that you'll feel better for watching it.
  • 17) It is a biographical experiment, but a deeply humane and sensitive one.
  • 18) A humane society does not allow it.
  • 19) To this end they should support objective research to boost our knowledge of the science of supposedly humane killing, which is currently thin.
  • 20) It was just humane, and stringent, and it was right.
  • 21) There are strict standards for humane killing, animal care, housing and health.
  • 22) To understand what's going on here, you really do need to watch this deeply humane film.
  • 23) Lyman focuses on the term humane meat, asking if killing can be humane and asserting that the only reason we eat meat is because we have an addiction to fat.
  • 24) On the campaign trail, latest GOP frontrunner Newt Gingrich came under fire for using the word "humane" in a debate answer about illegal immigration and suggesting we should adopt a policy to avoid tearing apart families.
  • 25) Chances are, if you get into a conversation about the conditions in which animals are raised for food in the United States, you will hear the word "humane" sooner or later.
  • 26) ‘These were the sort of things that tend to blur the clear perception of the visionary - troublesome motes like compassion and humane understanding and social concern.’
  • 27) ‘She assured him that she and her colleagues would adopt a compassionate and humane approach to all such cases.’
  • 28) ‘A new understanding of animal rights and humane animal treatment was what led him to become an activist and environmentalist, Mason said.’
  • 29) ‘You might also be interested to know that there has been a survey done to determine how much the public cares about humane treatment of the animals they use for food.’
  • 30) ‘The humane treatment of the animals was also a major priority.’
  • 31) ‘For me the ban, when implemented, will represent a step towards a more humane treatment of wild animals.’
  • 32) ‘How long should humane people tolerate that treatment and do nothing?’
  • 33) ‘One of its top priorities, the company says, is the humane treatment of animals.’
  • 34) ‘Therefore, they have rights of dignity, humane treatment, access to legal advice, and even correspondence.’
  • 35) ‘Generally, people who are astrologers or consult astrologers are humane, compassionate, insightful people, by and large.’
  • 36) ‘I have full faith that our scientists will go forward with a moral compass - with humane values and sound ethics guiding the way.’
  • 37) ‘We should aspire, along with being world champions in the sporting arena, to being the most humane and compassionate people on this planet.’
  • 38) ‘Could we not have protected our borders in more humane and compassionate ways?’
  • 39) ‘Esther's indomitable humane compassion drives her to risk her own life to oppose narrow and violent evil.’
  • 40) ‘Qualitatively speaking, there may even be something compassionate and humane in it.’
  • 41) ‘The Council will at all times act in a humane and compassionate fashion.’
  • 42) ‘It takes away all things that makes humans humane - tolerance, trust, generosity and compassion.’
  • 43) ‘One thing I do understand is that the more you try and push people into a more humane and understanding approach the more they tend to dig in their heels.’
  • 44) ‘It means the animal was raised under a specific set of protocols for humane treatment.’
  • 45) ‘Should we protest, now, for the humane treatment of prisoners?’
  • 46) ‘The patch has been found to be highly effective in treating pain in humans, and it may prove to be a more humane pain relief procedure for cats.’
  • 47) ‘But I am willing to put my concerns to one side if a humane stunning could be inflicted on the animal prior to its slaughter.’
  • 48) ‘All of the evidence is that a quick death by dogs is the most humane method available.’
  • 49) ‘We wouldn't because we have a more humane methods of killing them.’
  • 50) ‘He said a shot to the head was the only humane method of shooting.’
  • 51) ‘The cruel method of hanging a condemned man should be replaced by more humane methods such as lethal injections.’
  • 52) ‘In these areas we have killed foxes by shooting: a humane and efficient method when carried out by a skilled shot.’
  • 53) ‘This will take some hours and is the most humane household method of euthanasia known at this stage.’
  • 54) ‘Someday, maybe, they'll be able to treat spiders and humans as morally equal, but for now they need to concentrate on more humane slaughter methods.’
  • 55) ‘I accept they have to be controlled and I have been out in the field looking at various methods and have come to the conclusion that a marksman is the best and most humane method.’
  • 56) ‘I assumed he could be helpful in devising a humane, nonviolent method of execution.’
  • 57) ‘We want to make sure about the poison used and that it is indeed the most humane method of killing the birds.’
  • 58) ‘Most of the seals are being killed by clubbing to death, which is claimed to be a humane method.’
  • 59) ‘He said the halal cut, when animals are slaughtered by the cut-throat method, is more humane and does not spread infection.’
  • 60) ‘We now have indelible images of the conditions under which beasts are transported to countries where, it's said, killing is less than humane.’
  • 61) ‘Under new guidelines, most seals are meant to be shot and not clubbed to death in a bid to make the killing more humane.’
  • 62) ‘Only humane killing techniques, even if this involves non-traditional technology, should be used’
  • 63) ‘The farmers should be the only people who are allowed to kill foxes and their methods must be humane and not cause to much suffering to the animals.’
  • 64) ‘They are then put down using lethal injection, a method of dispatch confirmed as both legally acceptable and humane by the animal protection authorities.’
  • 65) ‘It's not a quick or humane death, and there are alternative methods.’
  • 66) ‘Transmitters of humane learning and values, Canadian universities had become responsible for the spread of Canadian civilization.’
  • 67) ‘Those scientists who did not come from the socially privileged classes had even more to gain by establishing reputations as men of humane learning.’
  • 68) ‘Without adequate monitoring, it is difficult to ensure that materials provided to schools embody the true principles of humane education.’
  • 69) ‘As a believer in the potential of computers in schools, he also reminds us of the deepest civic and humane goals of education.’
  • 70) ‘He just seems like a very smart, very humane voice in literature and I don't know why he isn't more widely disseminated.’
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