eagle vs hawk

eagle hawk

Definitions

  • 1) golf A score of two under par for a hole.
  • 2) A representation of such a bird carried as an emblem
  • 3) Any of several large carnivorous and carrion-eating birds in the family Accipitridae, having a powerful hooked bill and keen vision.
  • 4) US, numismatics A gold coin with a face value of $10.00 formerly used in the United States.
  • 5) A gold coin formerly used in the United States, stamped with an eagle on the reverse side and having a face value of ten dollars.
  • 6) Sports A golf score of two strokes under par on a hole.
  • 7) A representation of an eagle used as an emblem or insignia.
  • 8) Any of various large diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, including members of the genera Aquila and Haliaeetus, characterized by broad wings, a hooked bill, keen vision, and soaring flight.
  • 9) a gold coin of the United States worth twenty dollars.
  • 10) (Astron.) A northern constellation, containing Altair, a star of the first magnitude. See Aquila.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) any large owl of the genus Bubo, and allied genera; as the American great horned owl (Bubo Virginianus), and the allied European species (B. maximus). See Horned owl.
  • 12) See under Bold.
  • 13) See Bald eagle.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) any large species of ray of the genus Myliobatis (esp. M. aquila).
  • 15) A gold coin of the United States, of the value of ten dollars.
  • 16) The figure of an eagle borne as an emblem on the standard of the ancient Romans, or so used upon the seal or standard of any people.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) a large, crested, South American hawk of the genus Morphnus.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) Any large, rapacious bird of the Falcon family, esp. of the genera Aquila and Haliæetus. The eagle is remarkable for strength, size, graceful figure, keenness of vision, and extraordinary flight. The most noted species are the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaëtus); the imperial eagle of Europe (Aquila mogilnik or Aquila imperialis); the American bald eagle (Haliæetus leucocephalus); the European sea eagle (Haliæetus albicilla); and the great harpy eagle (Thrasaetus harpyia). The figure of the eagle, as the king of birds, is commonly used as an heraldic emblem, and also for standards and emblematic devices. See bald eagle, Harpy, and golden eagle.
  • 19) (Zoöl.) a large West African bid (Gypohierax Angolensis), intermediate, in several respects, between the eagles and vultures.
  • 20) an emblem representing power
  • 21) any of various large keen-sighted diurnal birds of prey noted for their broad wings and strong soaring flight
  • 22) (golf) a score of two strokes under par on a hole
  • 23) a former gold coin in the United States worth 10 dollars
  • 24) In the game of roulette, a spot, outside the regular 36 numbers, upon which is the picture of an eagle.
  • 25) In architecture, a name for a pediment.
  • 26) [capitalized] An ancient northern constellation between Cygnus and Sagittarius, containing the bright star Altair.
  • 27) A base foreign coin which circulated in England in the reign of Edward I.
  • 28) A name of many raptorial birds lager than the hawk and the buzzard, only distantly related, as the harpy eagle, booted eagle, etc.
  • 29) A member of the genus Haliaëtus, which comprises the fishing-eagles, sea-eagles, or earns, resembling the eagle proper in size and form, but having the shank bare of feathers and scaly: such as the white-or bald-headed eagle, or bald eagle, H. leucocephalus, the national emblem of the United States; the white-tailed eagle, H. albicilla; the pelagic eagle, H. pelagicus, etc.
  • 30) A military ensign or standard surmounted by the figure of an eagle.
  • 31) The young of the bald eagle, Haliaėtus leucocephalus.
  • 32) A gold coin of the United States, of the value of 10 dollars, weighing 258 grains troy, 900 fine, and equivalent to £2 1s. 1d. sterling.
  • 33) Properly, a very large diurnal raptorial bird of the family Falconidæ and genus Aquila (which see), having the feet feathered to the toes, and no tooth to the bill, which is straight for the length of the cere.
  • 34) A lectern, usually of wood or brass, the upper part of which is in the shape of an eagle with outstretched wings supporting a book-rest, the eagle being the symbol of Saint John the Evangelist.
  • 35) golf To score an eagle.
  • 36) shoot in two strokes under par
  • 37) shoot two strokes under par
  • 38) To score an eagle in golf.
  • 39) To shoot (a hole in golf) in two strokes under par.

Definitions

  • 1) politics An advocate of aggressive political positions.
  • 2) A plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard.
  • 3) A diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae.
  • 4) An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.
  • 5) Any of various similar birds of prey.
  • 6) Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
  • 7) One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
  • 8) An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.
  • 9) A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
  • 10) A person who preys on others; a shark.
  • 11) (Horology) the pawl for the rack, in the striking mechanism of a clock.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) An owl of India (Ninox scutellatus).
  • 13) (Zoöl.) a voracious fly of the family Asilidæ. See Hornet fly, under Hornet.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) an Asiatic bird of the genus Spizætus, or Limnætus, intermediate between the hawks and eagles. There are several species.
  • 15) See under Eagle.
  • 16) (Zoöl.) See Hawk moth, in the Vocabulary.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the family Falconidæ. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
  • 18) an attendant on a plasterer to supply him with mortar.
  • 19) (Masonry) A small board, with a handle on the under side, to hold mortar.
  • 20) (Zoöl.) the honey buzzard.
  • 21) A diurnal bird of prey which does not habitually feed upon carrion: contrasted with owl and with vulture.
  • 22) An effort to raise phlegm from the throat.
  • 23) A double-hooked instrument for drawing or moving about the cloth in the dyeing-liquor of a hawking-machine.
  • 24) With a specifying term, some bird that hawks for its prey on the wing.
  • 25) Synonyms Hawk, Falcon. Hawk is the most general and indefinite name of a bird of prey. It seems to have at first distinguished the birds so designated from carrion-feeding kinds and from those that prey by night (vultures and owls), and then to have been applied to those which could be trained—that is, used in the sport of hawking or falconry. Its nearest synonym is falcon; and since all hawks were formerly placed in one genus, Falco, hawk and falcon became interchangeable book-names for most members of the family Falconidæ. But, again, the hawks used in falconry were of two series, respectively designated noble and ignoble, corresponding to two technical subfamilies of Falconidæ. The name falcon became, therefore, technically restricted to the former of these series, the subfamily Falconinæ, while hawk was coincidently applied to the other, Accipitrinæ, alone.
  • 26) In building, a small quadrangular board with a handle underneath, used by plasterers to hold the mortar.
  • 27) intransitive To clear the throat loudly.
  • 28) transitive To sell.
  • 29) transitive To forcibly attempt to cough up (phlegm).
  • 30) transitive To hunt with a hawk.
  • 31) To offer for sale by outcry in a street or other public place, or from door to door; convey through town or country for sale: as, to hawk brooms or ballads.
  • 32) To fly in the manner of the hawk; soar; take prey in the air.
  • 33) To make an effort to raise phlegm from the throat.
  • 34) To raise by hawking: as, to hawk up phlegm.
  • 35) To hunt birds or small animals by means of hawks or falcons trained for the purpose; practise hawking; engage in falconry.
  • 36) To draw or to pull with a hawk, as cloth through the dye-vat of a hawking-machine.
  • 37) To clear the throat of (phlegm).
  • 38) To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.
  • 39) To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
  • 40) To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk.
  • 41) To hunt with trained hawks.
  • 42) To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
  • 43) To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk; -- generally with at.
  • 44) To catch, or attempt to catch, birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.
  • 45) To clear the throat with an audible sound by forcing an expiratory current of air through the narrow passage between the depressed soft palate and the root of the tongue, thus aiding in the removal of foreign substances.
  • 46) To raise by hawking, as phlegm.
  • 47) To offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle.

Examples

  • 1) Elephants come and go, sea eagles wheel in the sky.
  • 2) It is an elegant bird, an eagle with spread wings.
  • 3) PET owners have been warned to lock up their animals after a giant golden eagle escaped its perch.
  • 4) THIS golden eagle was rescued after being kept in a third floor flat's filthy kitchen.
  • 5) The golden eagle is significantly smaller all round.
  • 6) That run included four birdies and an eagle.
  • 7) Ospreys are fish hawks as large as eagles.
  • 8) There are still complaints from sheep farmers who claim sea eagles take their lambs.
  • 9) Both come under attack from golden eagles and peregrine falcons.
  • 10) Or the bald eagle that got the job in the end.
  • 11) The sea eagles feed on them but it does not stop the rabbits increasing.
  • 12) By then the two brilliant eagles he had conjured up on the second and eighth holes were just a distant memory.
  • 13) Legal eagles are on the case.
  • 14) The putt was holed for eagle.
  • 15) They had 25 birdies and one eagle between them.
  • 16) On the back nine he had 13 birdies and two eagles.
  • 17) Britain's largest eagle has enjoyed a record year.
  • 18) The American made two birdies and an eagle on the back nine.
  • 19) It was unmistakable: a bald eagle.
  • 20) I hit a lot of greens and obviously two eagles on the back nine helped my score a bit.
  • 21) Because some treat pitching for compensation like buying a lottery ticket, an attitude the legal eagles seem happy to encourage.
  • 22) His emblem is an eagle.
  • 23) Legal eagles will be watching.
  • 24) I'll look on like a proud parent bird at my eagle fledgling.
  • 25) It's dark red, not quite finished and has a large white eagle painted on one wall.
  • 26) Between the text and the eagle is a concentric circle of 50 small five-point stars.
  • 27) Above the eagle is a concentric banner below STATES OF, folded back at the ends, displaying E PLURIBUS UNUM.
  • 28) Around the eagle is a circle formed by two branches, olive on the left and palm on the right, tied at the bottom with a bow, and barely separated at the top.
  • 29) In the center of the eagle is a deer head, which signifies the shamanic soul that conveys wisdom through ritual chants.
  • 30) However the eagle is always looking to the right signifying that the
  • 31) Contrast "another angel," or messenger, with "the everlasting Gospel," Re 14: 6. through the midst of heaven -- Greek, "in the mid-heaven," that is, in the part of the sky where the sun reaches the meridian: in such a position as that the eagle is an object conspicuous to all. the inhabiters of the earth -- the ungodly, the "men of the world," whose
  • 32) Why what on airth is the meanin of this, said the Captain, why dont they haul down that damn goose and gridiron (thats what he called our eagle and stars on the flag.)
  • 33) (That's what he called our eagle and stars on the flag.) 'Why,' says the first leftenant,
  • 34) Eg, it is against the law to possess certain eagle feathers even if you just pick them up off the ground (unless one has a certain native american tribal affiliation).
  • 35) ‘The South African National Bird of Prey Centre takes in injured raptors - eagles, owls, sparrow hawks, for example - and nurses them back to health.’
  • 36) ‘It features free-flying displays and an opportunity for people to see at close hand some 30 different birds of prey, including eagles, buzzards and falcons.’
  • 37) ‘The Ende's consider the birds - eagles, falcons, hawks, owls and kestrels - as part of their family.’
  • 38) ‘In addition to human foes, Australian flying foxes must contend with a number of natural predators, including pythons, wedge-tailed eagles and powerful owls.’
  • 39) ‘The site, which is run by volunteers and houses more than 60 birds including owls, eagles and vultures, is a popular destination for families and school groups.’
  • 40) ‘For one thing, the ferrets weren't very predator savvy, and naive ferrets made easy prey for hawks, eagles and other grassland hunters.’
  • 41) ‘The seemingly insignificant scorpion, now moving under the shadows of the eagle's powerful wings, never even caught the bird's eye.’
  • 42) ‘He could spot mental mistakes and misjudgments in a ball game quicker than an airborne eagle catches sight of prey scurrying around on the ground.’
  • 43) ‘But in every generation, it seems, they try, remembering not the fall, but the heady lift of flight, the eagle soaring by.’
  • 44) ‘Hornbills are large, canopy-dwelling birds that fear eagles but don't mind leopards - after all, the birds fly and the leopards don't.’
  • 45) ‘My brother is into birds of prey - mostly eagles and falcons.’
  • 46) ‘Across the water were four immature eagles soaring, swooping, and suffering the aggression of what we believe was a Merlin.’
  • 47) ‘Dumbfounded, I forgot all about my camera until the eagle was out of sight.’
  • 48) ‘The flight of an eagle is a beautiful thing to watch: wings outspread, gliding and dipping, effortlessly riding invisible currents.’
  • 49) ‘I followed the majestic flight of an eagle reveling in his freedom, soaring through the skies as if they were his to roam at will.’
  • 50) ‘In recent years fanfare accompanied the return of species like the osprey and red kite in England and the white-tailed eagle in Scotland.’
  • 51) ‘He did not notice the eagles soaring over him, nor the vultures which looked down on him from his very own towers.’
  • 52) ‘From the roof terrace of his three-storey whitewashed house, Ian Gibson watches golden eagles swooping lazily above.’
  • 53) ‘Some years back, we reintroduced the white-tailed sea eagle here.’
  • 54) ‘A gorgeous golden eagle was perched on the sill.’
  • 55) ‘Germany's national symbol has been the eagle since Charlemagne was emperor from 800 to 814.’
  • 56) ‘In addition to the United States, numerous other nations through the ages have adopted the eagle as their symbol.’
  • 57) ‘Five hundred feet high, it was completed by a tall tower, crowned with the symbol of the State - an eagle and a swastika.’
  • 58) ‘Above the bench in the courtroom there was a double-headed eagle, a very ancient dynastic symbol representing the union of church and state.’
  • 59) ‘If you do a search for Dept. of Homeland Security's logo, it is a blue colour circular logo with an eagle in it.’
  • 60) ‘In the the Hall of St George, he shows me the newly restored twin-headed eagle, symbol of Tsarist Russia, from the top of the Winter Palace.’
  • 61) ‘He grabbed the presidential mobile phone, which had a double-headed eagle instead of buttons, from the nightstand.’
  • 62) ‘There were not many more British enthusiasts for the hammer and sickle than there had been for the double-headed eagle.’
  • 63) ‘In some cases, emblems that included eagles, the outline of the state or the American flag, for example, were deleted or simplified.’
  • 64) ‘Some of the designs were very simple and graphic, looking like the two-headed eagles of heraldry, and some were much more elaborate.’
  • 65) ‘It's no accident that John Altman's World War II thriller has a German eagle, a swastika and a Nazi-esque title font on the cover.’
  • 66) ‘By a decree of July 1804, the eagle and the bee were chosen as the two symbols of the empire.’
  • 67) ‘There he was, standing beneath an enormous gold-coloured double-headed eagle, Russia's national symbol, looked focused and unrattled.’
  • 68) ‘The money held by these Iraqis is decorated with American eagles, symbolizing the support given the Iraqis by the West.’
  • 69) ‘The national symbol of Serbia is a double-headed white eagle, a creature considered the king of animals.’
  • 70) ‘Napolean later tried to switch the bird for an eagle, saying, ‘the rooster has no strength.’’
  • 71) ‘Each pillar has four bronze columns supporting American eagles that hold a victory laurel.’
  • 72) ‘The coat of arms, adopted in 1992, consists of a gold eagle against a blue background holding a cross in its beak, a sword in one claw, and a scepter in the other.’
  • 73) ‘The gold Napoleonic eagle, emblem of the Coalition, stood out boldly on the front of their black berets.’
  • 74) ‘The German, Austrian, and Russian empires all included a double-headed eagle in their official arms.’
  • 75) ‘The first year, I was standing at the 18th green and had just finished playing when Lew Worsham scored an eagle 2 on the last hole.’
  • 76) ‘The ball pitched a few yards past the flag and, courtesy of a powerful amount of backspin, zipped back into the hole for an eagle two.’
  • 77) ‘Levet was first to play and there was delight when his little chip and run trickled into the hole for an eagle three.’
  • 78) ‘The 3-handicapper contributed three eagles and four birdies to his team en route to shooting a 69 on his own ball.’
  • 79) ‘Cheetham needed an eagle on the last hole of Tour School to make it back on to the circuit.’
  • 80) ‘Jerry Barber, all of 40 years ago, is the only other player in Masters history to have eagled the hole they call White Dogwood.’
  • 81) ‘The world number two made swift amends in his second round, eagling his second hole - the 11th - and going on to reach the turn in 32.’
  • 82) ‘He won the Crosby Plate at West Lancs in sensational style when he eagled the penultimate hole.’
  • 83) ‘Michael Hancock eagled the 14th hole with a big three.’
  • 84) ‘He dropped two shots over the first four holes but eagled the 501-yard par-five seventh before playing the rest of the round in level par.’
  • 85) the Roman eagle

Examples

  • 1) You've got to watch them like a hawk.
  • 2) She watches me like hawk.
  • 3) They have learnt how to fly hawks and lead horses.
  • 4) We are watching our money like hawks.
  • 5) Those investors are watching like hawks as we vote today.
  • 6) There was a great deal of public argument between the hawks and the doves.
  • 7) Once his big ambition was simply to fly hawks.
  • 8) Ignore the first time but watch him like a hawk.
  • 9) People think they are predators, but their nest was attacked by a hawk last year.
  • 10) The Government will be watching like hawks.
  • 11) Public opinion is split between hawks, doves and those sitting firmly on the fence.
  • 12) hawks and doves were temporarily replaced by a flock of starlings, wheeling and voting as one.
  • 13) TWO escaped hawks have been attacking residents in a seaside town.
  • 14) These birds can handle hawks.
  • 15) Sparrow hawks are still around.
  • 16) Once the hawk is eating from your fist, the next step is to get it to hop onto your fist from its perch.
  • 17) We aren't all hawks, you know.
  • 18) Lime hawk moth moth is named after the hawk because it capable of powerful, long- distance flight.
  • 19) A school near his family village has been named in his honour and street traders hawk T-shirts and calendars bearing his image.
  • 20) The entire research team is supposed to be hawking itself around, in one piece, to anyone who will listen.
  • 21) _wild_ hawk, a _hawk unreclaimed_, or _irreclaimable_.
  • 22) hawk catches a live animal The term hawk can be used in several ways: In strict usage in
  • 23) hawk catches a live animal The term hawk can be used in several ways: In strict usage in Europe and Asia, to mean any of the species in the subfamily
  • 24) The La Gana hawk is a good weapon but seems otherwise useless.
  • 25) To the Fried Hiatts who care about this stuff being a "deficit hawk" is about inflicting pain on Democratic constituencies, not reducing the deficit.
  • 26) SwtPrince_dk @RosGuild I am but mad N by NW when the wind is S'ly I know a hawk from a handsaw
  • 27) They are angry that there kids will be left in hawk up to their eye balls by the government.
  • 28) An animal control officer picked up an injured hawk from a person's yard and took the hawk to a wildlife rehabilitator.
  • 29) ‘Bird watchers will be treated to the sight of caracara hawks, Florida sandhill cranes, and numerous other species.’
  • 30) ‘If you're lucky, you can sight one of the smaller numbers of red-shoulder hawks, red-tail hawks and the elusive, endangered Peregrine Falcon.’
  • 31) ‘Red-tailed hawks and turkey vultures circled above us in a blue sky.’
  • 32) ‘Students will probably never forget the hawk spreading his magnificent wings as Mrs. Beck held him above her head.’
  • 33) ‘His crest hung on the wooden wall, the black hawk with wings perched in a frightful pose staring at her with its piercing golden eyes.’
  • 34) ‘When I tipped my head back, I saw the hawk buckle its wings and plummet behind the trees.’
  • 35) ‘The blinding sun flashed over the graceful wings of the hawk soaring through the clouds.’
  • 36) ‘To her surprise, an enormous hawk was perched on the branch of the cherry blossom tree.’
  • 37) ‘He's also a nature lover and when he saw a hawk chasing pigeons around the Kennaway Hotel on Friday morning he watched in awe.’
  • 38) ‘The family Accipitridae encompasses many of the diurnal birds of prey, including the familiar hawks and eagles.’
  • 39) ‘The falconers show us their range of beautiful but fairly sinister birds - hawks, eagles, vultures etc - and then treat us to an outdoor display with a falcon.’
  • 40) ‘In addition to rare plants and wildflowers, you'll find hawks and ospreys lining the river and a host of waders along the shoreline.’
  • 41) ‘Around the lake we could see samples of most of Florida's native birds, such as osprey, anhinga, eagles, hawks, and herons.’
  • 42) ‘Along waterways and ponds you're likely to see parrots and macaws, hawks and jabiru storks.’
  • 43) ‘Quarry is eaten on the ground or on a stump, the hawk standing with both feet on its victim, drooping wings to form a tent and spreading its tail as if to give support.’
  • 44) ‘Gulls, hawks and vultures soar, swallows and terns skim the surface of water.’
  • 45) ‘Many wild hatchlings of these earlier returnees have fallen prey to Galapagos hawks, a natural predator that has coexisted with tortoises for eons.’
  • 46) ‘There remain some obstinate holdouts from the old marsh life, including a pair of nesting hawks who perch on the light standards over the roadway, scanning the cars going in and out of the university.’
  • 47) ‘The fencing is 5 feet high and has occasional cross fencing to keep hawks from swooping in and snatching up one of the chickens.’
  • 48) ‘Look for seals and river otters that sometimes come in at high tide and hawks that cruise the surrounding fields for small game.’
  • 49) ‘The regular flying demonstrations give visitors the opportunity to see some of the 75 eagles, falcons, hawks, vultures and owls at close range.’
  • 50) ‘Employees from Ashford Castle's school of falconry bring hawks and falcons to Rathroeen where they keep vermin and other birds at bay.’
  • 51) ‘He enjoyed the atmosphere and, despite the distance, is interested in bringing his owls, hawks and falcons back down next year.’
  • 52) ‘He resembles a small hawk or falcon who has just been unhooded: rapt, sharp-featured, luminously alive to the moment.’
  • 53) ‘An Ayrshire school was forced to hire falconers armed with hawks to safeguard its pupils.’
  • 54) ‘It is Britain's leading hatchery for the export of hunting hawks and falcons and the chicks it sends to clients in Africa, India and the United States are valued at thousands of pounds.’
  • 55) ‘The main aim of the business is to breed and sell falcons and hawks, with ‘experience’ days for groups of two to six people involving about four cars a day.’
  • 56) ‘But the next day, they happen upon a group of people hunting with falcons and hawks, one of which is an elegant, noble, beautiful lady.’
  • 57) ‘A favorite hunting hawk of the emperors flew into the camp of Guru Hargobind who was also hunting.’
  • 58) ‘Americans may indeed be well served externally at this dangerous juncture by the unsentimental foreign policy hawks that tend to predominate in the Republican Party.’
  • 59) ‘The administration hawks don't want disarmament, they want conquest; and whether or not they get to pursue it in this case, their overall objectives will not change.’
  • 60) ‘Mirroring the shallowness of hawks, who condemn peaceniks for their lack of patriotism, many doves castigate anyone who is not opposed to war.’
  • 61) ‘He's following the path of conservative hawks who have derailed progress with North Korea for the past decade.’
  • 62) ‘Leading hawks within the Bush administration are gloating over their humbling of Europe and are opposed to any concessions to America's rivals.’
  • 63) ‘‘Regime change’ is now the justification for war, with all that this implies for the future plans of the hawks in the White House.’
  • 64) ‘Japan's leaders are neither doves nor hawks but pragmatists, for whom economic and military security are equally important.’
  • 65) ‘The hawks and the peaceniks, the left and the right, all believed that we would, indeed fight the Soviets over Western Europe, over missiles in Cuba, etc.’
  • 66) ‘The hawks saw the new policy as providing political cover for war, humoring the international community while remaining hostile to the return of the weapons inspectors.’
  • 67) ‘Most liberal hawks have advocated a muscular enforcement of the human rights agenda.’
  • 68) ‘Pakistan, North Korea and China are also developing weapons of mass destruction but even the most rabid hawks in the US government are not talking about invading those countries.’
  • 69) ‘During the cold war even the most extreme hawks were chastened in their aggressive impulses by fear of escalation into a full-blown conflict with the USSR.’
  • 70) ‘Few believe these same Cold War hawks actually care about foreign peoples, as they were fairly open about their indifference to human rights not so long ago.’
  • 71) ‘I'm a fiscal conservative, social/cultural liberal and foreign policy hawk.’
  • 72) ‘Gore, too, once was a moderate, a founder of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council and a hawk on foreign policy.’
  • 73) ‘I'm a classical liberal, economically (laissez-faire is my mantra) and a hawk on foreign policy and defense.’
  • 74) ‘Right now, the Democratic foreign policy hawks are calling for more troops - an impossibility.’
  • 75) ‘With respect to China, it is true that September 11 did block movement toward a new hard-line policy from Washington that some administration hawks may have wanted.’
  • 76) ‘Unable in a state election to run as a foreign policy hawk, she did the next best thing by choosing a Republican admiral as her running mate.’
  • 77) ‘She had a weakness for fine clothes and being a vigorous lady, she enjoyed hawking, shooting the long bow, and making the trip from Theobalds to Westminster, a dozen miles away on horseback.’
  • 78) ‘They were also one of the most popular game birds for hawking and Henry VIII passed legislation imposing heavy fines on those caught stealing heron eggs or killing them by any means other than hawking.’
  • 79) ‘Successful hawking becomes routine, and soon one hunt per day is not enough.’
  • 80) ‘I did see a few egrets in the fields (maybe cattle egrets) and a group of blue-cheeked bee-eaters hawking for insects and perching on powerlines.’
  • 81) ‘Swifts screaming overhead, hawking for insects in their no-compromise lifestyle.’
  • 82) ‘Fishing bats are large, yellow-orange, and rather pungent creatures that can hawk large flying insects or snag small ocean fish from the surf.’
  • 83) ‘Gone were flocks of starlings feeding along the runway; no kestrels hawking on the infields for small mammals; egrets, herons, crows, gulls, and geese all but disappeared.’
  • 84) ‘For the first time this year there were lots of swifts hawking the riverside fields.’
  • 85) ‘People are renting rooms, running taxis, selling ice-cream out of their front windows and hawking cigars and peanuts in the streets.’
  • 86) ‘I felt a little uncharitable: maybe they were just honest but hard-up Grimsby trawlermen, reduced to hawking their catch on the streets.’
  • 87) ‘By coincidence, the restaurant was across the street from where Bradbury was hawking newspapers.’
  • 88) ‘While lots of children his age go to school, Rizki is on the street in the hot sun or rain seven days a week hawking papers while dodging the traffic.’
  • 89) ‘As recently as the late 1960s, vendors hawked turtle eggs in the streets of Chennai.’
  • 90) ‘The streets were crowded with all sorts of creatures hawking their wares and goods.’
  • 91) ‘At Miami Carnival in October, several soca music traders set up stalls at major venues, openly hawking illegally acquired wares and at giveaway prices.’
  • 92) ‘I also saw Microsoft tablet PC kiosks in Denver, as well as a booth hawking Intel's new Centrino product.’
  • 93) ‘They spend hours browsing such jewellery hawked on pavements.’
  • 94) ‘Children hawk small items and souvenirs, sometimes working for the vendors who have stalls in Sangha near the guesthouse.’
  • 95) ‘Men and women everywhere hawked government-controlled newspapers printed on a grayish, low-grade newsprint no doubt full of comparably dull propaganda.’
  • 96) ‘Hacks offered guided rides, property owners preserved battle damage for display, and relic hunters hawked everything from bones to bullets.’
  • 97) ‘Young boys hawking phone cards and cigarettes circulate among the tables as regularly as the uniformed waiters.’
  • 98) ‘We meandered through the men hawking Rolexes and Yankees knit caps, our coats and scarves wrapped tight to combat the brisk wind coming off the water.’
  • 99) ‘McGauley does all the promotion himself, spending as many Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays as he can hawking his books at craft fairs, readings, and bookstore signings.’
  • 100) ‘She liked to shop, casually wandering throughout the market, occasionally listening to the white clad merchants hawk their wares.’
  • 101) ‘Bands played, people danced, and merchants hawked their wares.’
  • 102) ‘This conference exists so they can hawk their wares to an audience of government officials, in this case mostly mayors.’
  • 103) ‘Stall owners hawked their wares under canopies of brightly colored cloth.’
  • 104) ‘A bustling area at the crossroads, stands were set up where women and men were hawking things from jewels and fabrics to vegetables and fruits.’
  • 105) ‘Their subtle lack of receptiveness is finally made flagrantly obvious when one noisily hawks an enormous loogie and spits it onto the stove, where it sizzles like an oyster at a beachside barbecue.’
  • 106) ‘You hear everything: coughing, hawking up a loogey, vomiting.’
  • 107) ‘Plus, who doesn't like hawking up big gobs of phlegm?’
  • 108) ‘Having spent most of last night coughing, hawking and spitting, I really wasn't in the mood for the arrival of Lucy Smooth's workmen this morning.’
  • 109) ‘Misogyny is metal's oldest, most boring trick and no less boring when it's spouted by some guy who sounds like he's trying to hawk up a loogie.’
  • 110) ‘He had hawked up as much phlegm and mucus as he could muster into that spit and watched it slide nastily down Cassius' face in streaks of yellow and white.’
  • 111) ‘The whole thing sticks in my throat like a fish bone, and I've got to hawk it up or choke to death on it.’
  • 112) ‘Well most people can hawk it up and spit it out of their mouth… but I cannot do that.’
  • 113) ‘I was prepared to neatly hawk it up, wipe my mouth, and toss my little bag in the nearest trash can.’
  • 114) ‘I don't know if I swallowed it or hawked it up, but I couldn't get it to go either way for a long time.’
  • 115) ‘They stood on the dusty grass together, blowing brown slime from their noses and hawking it up from their throats.’
  • 116) ‘Adults have the type of lung TB that forms abscesses and they produce lots of sputum, lots of AFBS and can hawk it up to be tested.’
  • 117) ‘Regarding personal habits, you will meet few people who still manage snot and mucus in the traditional way by hawking it up noisily and then spitting, at least not in the city.’
  • 118) ‘Load some stucco on a hawk and then onto your trowel.’
  • 119) ‘For large jobs, a hawk is better than a mud pan.’
  • 120) ‘Moisten your plywood hawk and load it up with mortar. Hold the hawk against the wall and use a long, thin trowel to pack mortar into joints.’
  • 121) ‘Load the mortar onto a mortar hawk, then press the filler into the joints with a joint filler.’
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