divert vs deviate

divert deviate

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete, intransitive To turn aside; to digress.
  • 2) transitive To turn aside from a course.
  • 3) transitive To turn aside from a course.
  • 4) obsolete, intransitive To turn aside; to digress.
  • 5) transitive To distract.
  • 6) transitive To entertain or amuse (by diverting the attention)
  • 7) transitive To entertain or amuse (by diverting the attention)
  • 8) transitive To distract.
  • 9) turn aside; turn away from
  • 10) send on a course or in a direction different from the planned or intended one
  • 11) withdraw (money) and move into a different location, often secretly and with dishonest intentions
  • 12) occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion
  • 13) Amuse, Divert, Entertain, etc. (see amuse); to delight, exhilarate.
  • 14) Tosubvert;destroy.
  • 15) Synonyms To draw away. See absent, a.
  • 16) To turn to a different point or end; change the aim or destination of; draw to another course, purpose, or destiny.
  • 17) To turn from customary or serious occupation; furnish diversion to; amuse; entertain.
  • 18) To turn aside; turn out of one's way; digress.
  • 19) To turn aside or away; change the direction or course of; cause to move or act in a different line or manner: as, to divert a stream from its bed; to divert the mind from its troubles; he was diverted from his purpose.
  • 20) To subvert; destroy.
  • 21) To turn aside from a course or direction.
  • 22) To entertain by distracting the attention from worrisome thoughts or cares; amuse. synonym: amuse.
  • 23) To turn aside.
  • 24) To entertain by distracting the attention from worrisome thoughts or cares; amuse. synonym: amuse.
  • 25) To distract.
  • 26) obsolete To turn aside; to digress.
  • 27) obsolete To turn aside; to digress.
  • 28) To turn away from any occupation, business, or study; to cause to have lively and agreeable sensations; to amuse; to entertain
  • 29) To turn aside; to turn off from any course or intended application; to deflect

Definitions

  • 1) statistics A value equal to the difference between a measured variable factor and a fixed or algorithmic reference value.
  • 2) sociology A person with deviant behaviour; a deviant, degenerate or pervert.
  • 3) sociology A person with deviant behaviour; a deviant, degenerate or pervert.
  • 4) statistics A value equal to the difference between a measured variable factor and a fixed or algorithmic reference value.
  • 5) A deviant.
  • 6) a person having behavior differing from that which is normal or socially acceptable; -- used especially to characterize persons whose sexual behavior is considered morally unacceptable.
  • 7) a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
  • 8) having behavior differing from that which is normal or expected, especially in an undesirable or socially disapproved manner.
  • 9) markedly different from an accepted norm
  • 10) intransitive To fall outside of, or part from, some norm; to stray.
  • 11) intransitive To go off course from; to change course; to change plans.
  • 12) intransitive To go off course from; to change course; to change plans.
  • 13) intransitive To fall outside of, or part from, some norm; to stray.
  • 14) turn aside; turn away from
  • 15) cause to turn away from a previous or expected course
  • 16) be at variance with; be out of line with
  • 17) To change the direction or position of, as a ray of light or the plane of polarization. See biquartz.
  • 18) To cause to swerve; lead astray.
  • 19) To turn aside or wander from the way or course; err; swerve: as, to deviate from the common track or path, or from a true course.
  • 20) To take a different course; diverge; differ.
  • 21) To cause to turn aside or differ.
  • 22) To turn aside from a course or way.
  • 23) To depart, as from a norm, purpose, or subject; differ or stray. synonym: swerve.
  • 24) To depart, as from a norm, purpose, or subject; differ or stray. synonym: swerve.
  • 25) To go out of the way; to turn aside from a course or a method; to stray or go astray; to err; to digress; to diverge; to vary.
  • 26) rare To cause to deviate.
  • 27) rare To cause to deviate.

Examples

  • 1) He thought this was a cheap shot by the chemical industry to divert attention away from pesticides.
  • 2) But she sees it as me diverting my attention elsewhere.
  • 3) All flights were suspended with planes diverted to other airports.
  • 4) He said that he thought it was wrong for so much money to be diverted from patient care.
  • 5) They risk diverting aid money from those who need it most to those who have no need of it at all.
  • 6) So it must be painfully apparent to a leading man giving his all in a big musical number when the audience has its attention forcibly diverted.
  • 7) He said:'It is fantastic this money will be diverted from vanity projects to saving lives.
  • 8) Shouldn't our aid money be diverted for three months to support our NHS?
  • 9) In its current construct, the NIC is in danger of becoming just a mildly diverting government think tank.
  • 10) But it has emerged that the government diverted most of the money elsewhere.
  • 11) That would be wrong and divert funds away from essential care.
  • 12) It proved that the plane had diverted drastically from its flight plan.
  • 13) They can also save by diverting calls to voicemail or texting instead of phoning.
  • 14) Traffic was being diverted and backing up down side streets.
  • 15) It is welcome that savings in departmental spending are being diverted to capital spending programmes.
  • 16) The disclosure comes as the government faces pressure to divert money to protect defence spending.
  • 17) It should be diverting parents away from contested hearings into the making of parenting plans.
  • 18) They also divert labour and capital towards protected industries and away from more productive uses.
  • 19) But four miles from the base the student pilot had to divert his plane to avoid a crash.
  • 20) By no means should a diplomatic plane with the president be diverted from its route and forced to land in another country.
  • 21) Still, its stars and its general polish make it diverting enough.
  • 22) But the financial crisis has diverted governments' attention.
  • 23) Through traffic will be diverted via the A303.
  • 24) But this call is diverted, so the bank talks to the fraudster instead.
  • 25) Still, its action scenes make it diverting.
  • 26) Margaret tried to talk of other things, but was in too much discomfort to exert herself enough to divert his attention.
  • 27) Its enduring economic effects are to divert scarce capital from more productive uses, and to provoke other countries to erect trade barriers.
  • 28) Music of quality, in the context of worship, does not entertain or divert.
  • 29) Soon you will have something new to divert you on a wet Bank Holiday.
  • 30) They're just making time so that people's attention is diverted.
  • 31) The plan was abandoned, the lot was sold at a profit, and the funds were diverted to another purpose.
  • 32) Based on the White House's response to the last leak about Afghanistan, the temptation seems strong to once again divert attention away from accountability.
  • 33) If someone decides to try and divert from the conventional wisdom, the parties deem them non-viable and pull their support and money.
  • 34) Arquette said one way he's been able to divert from the separation from Cox, star of the TV series "Friends" and "Cougar Town," is focusing on his professional career.
  • 35) Of course, the RGA desperately tries to divert from the corruption of Christie's associations with KARL ROVE (of all people), currently under investigation for ethics violation.
  • 36) This resolution isn't to divert from the national talk, but to hold an elected official ACCOUNTABLE.
  • 37) The only problem I had with this book is that the author sometimes tends to divert from the main point and go on at length about other things.
  • 38) ‘With such potential being diverted away from worthwhile direction, I must admit that it breaks a little bit of my heart.’
  • 39) ‘Another method employs moveable flaps in the rocket motor to divert the exhaust flow direction.’
  • 40) ‘By 1920 state and private interests had carved four massive canals to divert water directly into the Atlantic Ocean and create dry farmland.’
  • 41) ‘Also, the flashing must be carefully designed and constructed to direct and divert the water.’
  • 42) ‘Junctions 33 to 34 of the M6 were closed in both directions, meaning all traffic was diverted through the city.’
  • 43) ‘The Chief Minister said he sees a collision course approaching but won't do anything to divert it.’
  • 44) ‘Hastily, they'd written a bill to eliminate the right to divert a river for a kayak course.’
  • 45) ‘One option would be running a light railway or tram system over the new bridge as well as diverting lorries across it.’
  • 46) ‘Indeed, diverting the buses could mean that some were no longer able to go out.’
  • 47) ‘Unfortunately, the Garda patrol car was diverted to another incident and never reached Ballycastle that night.’
  • 48) ‘When they thought that we had left, I took a full circle and diverted the car towards quarry number 1.’
  • 49) ‘That's why they diverted the dual carriageway from the airport to avoid disturbing the fairy fort.’
  • 50) ‘Both schemes will divert more traffic to William Hunter Way and there are also suggestions for junction improvements.’
  • 51) ‘Apparently much of the water upstream has been diverted for agricultural use.’
  • 52) ‘Planes were diverted to airfields in the Philippines and the Intrepid was knocked out of action until February 1945.’
  • 53) ‘Trucks and buses were also banned from using the flyover, with commercial vehicles diverted to the roundabout underneath.’
  • 54) ‘His soldiers leveled their villages and his engineers diverted and drained the water that gave the marshes life.’
  • 55) ‘Outbound lanes will be closed and drivers diverted to detours for another week.’
  • 56) ‘Keep it this way, and maybe I could divert all questions.’
  • 57) ‘I'll divert more power to the shields, that should give us a little more time.’
  • 58) ‘Curious, the Mistress of Freeport diverted from her course to have a closer look.’
  • 59) ‘Police said the men diverted onto the Sir Solomon Hochoy Highway and then onto the Eastern Main Road.’
  • 60) ‘The cruise liner diverted from its course to cut down the flying time of the helicopter from RAF Lossiemouth.’
  • 61) ‘Your author furthermore diverts from the real alternatives and moves to gas and coal.’
  • 62) ‘If you thought geocaching was a bit anoraky I've now diverted slightly into trigpointing.’
  • 63) ‘Instead we happily divert to supposed ‘safe’ spots, there to be uncivilly mugged or traffic-maimed.’
  • 64) ‘They trusted me that we could divert from the norm, do something very unusual and take that risk.’
  • 65) ‘Charging only on motorways alone would increase traffic on local roads as drivers would divert to avoid the charge.’
  • 66) ‘People divert from their normal route to avoid disturbing this not so rare breed!’
  • 67) ‘Lisa quickly diverted from her lacky wannabe followers and stood by Hannah's locker.’
  • 68) ‘This survey will doubtless indicate how many private car owners have diverted to which alternative routes.’
  • 69) ‘Cartagena is on the north coast of Colombia, and the Master diverted there.’
  • 70) ‘I also diverted to Dublin to check out its diving scene - more of that in a later issue.’
  • 71) ‘Gas and weather were no problem, so we could divert if we had to.’
  • 72) ‘Nowadays I'll divert from my route if I sense I'm making a fellow pedestrian feel uncomfortable, man or woman.’
  • 73) ‘While some roads have been made one-way and BMTC buses diverted, congestion hasn't eased.’
  • 74) ‘Even this was false, and the aircraft then diverted to Riyan.’
  • 75) ‘Sometimes these things do not even occur because the vessels divert to somewhere else.’
  • 76) ‘He told them the nature of our emergency and said we were diverting to Cherry Point, N.C.’
  • 77) ‘Many passengers are still unaware of the changes and are surprised when these buses divert from their old routes.’
  • 78) ‘Resources will be diverted into intervention and community services.’
  • 79) ‘From now on resources will be diverted into the new versions of the PlayStation and X-Box.’
  • 80) ‘Money could be diverted into areas where it could be put to better use, such as policing hard core drugs.’
  • 81) ‘Resources are therefore diverted into lower-value outputs, leading to a reduction in overall welfare.’
  • 82) ‘The point is that if that money were diverted into transport uses, taxation would have to be raised from other sources.’
  • 83) ‘But we could easily save money, diverting resources to more innovative management practices.’
  • 84) ‘They do not, as far as I know, complain that a huge slice of their council tax is diverted into the coffers of the art gallery.’
  • 85) ‘In developing countries on high growth trajectories, household savings may be diverted into productive investment.’
  • 86) ‘Money going towards a grant of £1, 000 a year from 2004 could also be diverted into reducing the level of fees.’
  • 87) ‘Spending on capital goods means that resources are diverted away from consumption and vice versa.’
  • 88) ‘But the money was then diverted into his own building society account and used to fund his expensive lifestyle.’
  • 89) ‘The service will see more than 100 tonnes of organic waste diverted from landfill each year.’
  • 90) ‘The result was an ambitious target for Essex of 65 per cent of waste diverted from landfill without incineration by 2007.’
  • 91) ‘Studies are on to find other alternatives and the Government should divert more funds towards this.’
  • 92) ‘By recycling these items they are diverted from landfill avoiding the associated environmental problems.’
  • 93) ‘Precious health dollars have been diverted to pay the tax bill of a public trust.’
  • 94) ‘By using the green recycling bin, you can divert up to 25% of waste from landfill.’
  • 95) ‘"Even though the quantity is not a whole lot, any waste that we can divert from landfill is helpful, " he said.’
  • 96) ‘Yet it might divert huge amounts of capital for replacing fossil fuels rapidly with alternative energy sources.’
  • 97) ‘Also, of course, grain prices will rise as cropland is diverted to growing corn for fuel.’
  • 98) ‘As memes evolve, they become better and better at distracting and diverting us from whatever we'd really like to be doing with our lives.’
  • 99) ‘If you want to stop your baby doing something, the best way is to quickly distract and divert her onto a different activity.’
  • 100) ‘Her attempt to get his attention only partially diverted him.’
  • 101) ‘A moment of weakness is when you divert someone's attention and throw ground habanero into their soup!’
  • 102) ‘This means trivialities that could distract or divert his focus of attention, which is winning golf tournaments, do not sidetrack him.’
  • 103) ‘My fear is that attention will be diverted from issues that really matter to Selby miners, such as securing better pension rights.’
  • 104) ‘Those who go to mosques for prayers should not allow their attention to be diverted for any reason.’
  • 105) ‘In a way it is now a silent crisis, because our attention has been diverted to other disasters.’
  • 106) ‘So what do they do, but divert the public's attention to social issues that they know are wrong.’
  • 107) ‘It diverts the public's attention away from decades of cuts in hard-won government programs for income security.’
  • 108) ‘Rose diverts all of her attention to the hot tea, inadvertently releasing Delilah from her magical hold.’
  • 109) ‘For this doctrine diverts the public's attention from the core of the problem.’
  • 110) ‘Therefore, attention should not be diverted from traditional risk-lowering strategies in favor of folic acid supplementation.’
  • 111) ‘They were satisfied to find none, and then divert all their attention to Auntie Jane.’
  • 112) ‘With Tane's attention momentarily diverted, Ferik's knee swung upwards into his stomach.’
  • 113) ‘The best trick is to momentarily divert their attention - " Hey!’
  • 114) ‘My eyes were momentarily diverted to a pile of my books at the end of my bed.’
  • 115) ‘They warned that people's lives were being put at risk because firefighters were being diverted from their duties.’
  • 116) ‘Then he got diverted because he got to eat rice for the first time last night in eight months because he only had wotou before.’
  • 117) ‘I am sorry, yes, perhaps I got diverted, your Honour.’
  • 118) ‘Sitting in the pub at lunchtime with his nibs, a pint and a good book was far more entertaining and diverting.’
  • 119) ‘Needless to say, I wanted to put the book aside, because it is not entertaining or diverting.’
  • 120) ‘I was diverted and entertained, but never truly absorbed.’
  • 121) ‘He never concerned himself with diverting or weaving an illusory web for his audience.’
  • 122) ‘The best of these books are not only diverting entertainments: they are serious explorations of human character.’
  • 123) ‘So, suffice it to say, in one way or another Hamilton's books are sufficiently diverting, which is something I need right now.’
  • 124) ‘It is endlessly diverting and can keep a simpleton like me amused for near hours on end.’
  • 125) ‘A culture frantic to entertain, divert, and inform cannot drown out boredom.’
  • 126) ‘The earliest concertos composed for square piano are slight works, diverting but light weight.’
  • 127) ‘But some people aren't just looking to be diverted or entertained by music.’
  • 128) ‘Ultimately, though, Lessing provides a cracking good story that diverts, entertains and stimulates.’
  • 129) ‘At their best, these tales entertain and divert.’
  • 130) ‘But to be entertained is to be diverted, for that is what all these activities are: diversions.’
  • 131) ‘A diverting entertainment nonetheless, this is one book not to judge by its blocky lime-green cover or its bland layout.’
  • 132) ‘This keeps most of the fans diverted while others buy programs, CDs and drinks.’

Examples

  • 1) I deviate twenty degrees off course, into the nearest trees, and glance back.
  • 2) 'But listen, if it's on default - it probably won't deviate from its course once it's set.
  • 3) ‘Meanwhile, the rest of the world must not deviate from its carbon-cutting course.’
  • 4) ‘Sometimes members deviate from the course, and commanders must take corrective actions.’
  • 5) ‘The wristbands are not freely distributed to our employees as it would deviate from the original intention to help our target beneficiaries in Indonesia who need curative eye treatment.’
  • 6) ‘If, like me and so many other people, you've read the books over and over, the movies irritate every time they deviate from the original.’
  • 7) ‘In the end, I submit that what nonoriginalists really want is not to follow the happenstance of changed meanings but to ignore or deviate from the original meaning because they disagree with it.’
  • 8) ‘However, this is different from authority to deviate from the law, especially international legal obligations.’
  • 9) ‘Although he's not obligated to deviate from his original quest to destroy the kingpins of the criminal underworld, taking a few minutes to eliminate rabble in the streets augments the game significantly in two ways.’
  • 10) ‘Yet in each of these films, the most memorable elements are those which deviate from the original novel.’
  • 11) ‘The text itself provides examples of films from each period/genre, though we tend to deviate from that in actually presenting the course.’
  • 12) ‘It is essential, however, that these paths intersect at key points, so one can stray or purposively deviate from an easier trail to a more difficult one (or from a more defined to a less defined one).’
  • 13) ‘Drifting on like a seemingly endless summers day this song does quite contrastingly deviate from the idea of not having a care in the world.’
  • 14) ‘And again the creature came within a few meters of him but simply continued floating after Angel as though it was loathe to deviate from her rather ridiculous circular course.’
  • 15) ‘In one case, a sea captain followed his urge to change his ship's course, even though this caused him to deviate from the most direct route to his port.’
  • 16) ‘However, the main character of madrasas, to promote and establish Islam, cannot be changed, as we cannot deviate from the main purpose.’
  • 17) ‘At the very best, the Energy Department might be allowed to deviate from the proposed corridor within 10 percent of the original plan.’
  • 18) ‘As a result of this literary pre-knowledge many people were eager to tell us just how and in what ways the films have dared to deviate from the authority of Tolkien's original.’
  • 19) ‘Unfortunately, Tales from Loobiecore doesn't deviate from the formula he established on the first two Sentridoh releases, only even less inspired and just plain bland most of the time.’
  • 20) ‘But so strong are the temptations to deviate from this path that we must make it an unbreakable precept never to give our assent unless the evidence compels it.’
  • 21) ‘Therefore, to what extent the actual divergence times deviate from those predicted by these models is also of great concern.’
  • 22) ‘In fact, globalists who deviate from the official portrayal of globalization as benefiting everyone must bear the consequences of their criticism.’
  • 23) ‘‘It doesn't make sense to deviate from the standard except in a small way if there are pragmatic deviations that make sense,’ he said.’
  • 24) ‘How much sacrifice are we willing to make, how much are we willing to deviate from the socially accepted standard behaviour?’
  • 25) ‘Such a high premium exists on the female appearance, anything we do to deviate from the accepted standard of beauty is seen as reckless endangerment.’
  • 26) ‘Whichever of these is the case, it is clear that for an astrologer to deviate from these accepted values would be considered very unusual.’
  • 27) ‘That approach consists of a code of good practice (The Highway Code), a requirement that drivers pass a qualifying test, and a network of offences to penalize those who deviate from proper standards.’
  • 28) ‘The controversial part was the catch-all phrase ‘practices that seriously deviate from those commonly accepted.’’
  • 29) ‘How much can you deviate from a standard and still function?’
  • 30) ‘And how greatly does that behavior deviate from bygone standards of greater constraint?’
  • 31) ‘To answer clinically valuable questions, it is often necessary for clinical trials to randomize subjects to interventions that deviate from the standard of care in medical practice.’
  • 32) ‘It's only dangerous if you get careless and deviate from safety standards.’
  • 33) ‘Hurston's representation may deviate from standard scientific format, but apparently in contrast to Odum and Johnson, she strives more than they to retain the essential content.’
  • 34) ‘This clause says the Minister can allow a department not to exercise integrity, to deviate from the standards set out.’
  • 35) ‘Carriers and vendors will always strive to differentiate themselves by introducing equipment and services that deviate from existing standards.’
  • 36) ‘If you deviated from this standard, you were shackled with guilt.’
  • 37) ‘Any treatment protocol that deviates from the community standard of care should be carefully considered and voluntarily chosen by the patient, and explicit documentation of this should be included in the medical record.’
  • 38) ‘A board that attempts to follow a standard procedure, but deviates from it on a regular basis may be less productive than it would be if it didn't try to follow the procedure.’
  • 39) ‘That opinion must state that the doctor in question deviated from the standard of care and caused injury or death to occur.’
  • 40) ‘The Zulu, on the other hand, have their own traditional courtship practices which deviate somewhat from the patriarchal standard typical of most tribal societies.’
  • 41) ‘But assuming the study was accurate, why is it that women are the ones who are seen as having an unusual response here, deviating somehow from the ‘norm’?’
  • 42) ‘After all, unlike, say, The Dave Matthews Band, Benton and his God-killing comrades deviate pretty far from accepted societal norms.’
  • 43) ‘The stigmatising of homosexuals as perverts or deviates is over.’
  • 44) ‘Anyway, the ‘real’ sex between us is wonderful, but I would like to know if he is a deviate who perhaps needs professional help. - Louisiana Lady’
  • 45) ‘Three Kiktu warriors were especially vociferous in their displeasure; exchanging loud quips on the subject of pitiful, decrepit, tired, over-large, old, ugly, beaten-down, one-eyed sexual deviates.’
  • 46) ‘She fought the temptation to urinate, as she'd done to the first, as a deviate had done to her long ago.’
  • 47) ‘Is that what you want - the blessings of God upon these sexual deviates?’
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