difference vs deference

difference deference

Definitions

  • 1) countable, uncountable Significant change in or effect on a situation or state.
  • 2) countable The result of a subtraction; sometimes the absolute value of this result.
  • 3) countable, uncountable Significant change in or effect on a situation or state.
  • 4) countable The result of a subtraction; sometimes the absolute value of this result.
  • 5) uncountable The quality of being different.
  • 6) countable A characteristic of something that makes it different from something else.
  • 7) countable A characteristic of something that makes it different from something else.
  • 8) countable A disagreement or argument.
  • 9) countable A disagreement or argument.
  • 10) uncountable The quality of being different.
  • 11) The amount that remains after one quantity is subtracted from another.
  • 12) The amount by which one quantity is greater or less than another.
  • 13) Discrimination in taste or choice; distinction.
  • 14) The quality or condition of being unlike or dissimilar.
  • 15) A disagreement or controversy.
  • 16) An instance of disparity or unlikeness.
  • 17) A noticeable change or effect.
  • 18) A degree or amount by which things differ.
  • 19) The act of differing; the state or measure of being different or unlike; distinction; dissimilarity; unlikeness; variation
  • 20) obsolete Choice; preference.
  • 21) (Logic) The quality or attribute which is added to those of the genus to constitute a species; a differentia.
  • 22) (Math.) The quantity by which one quantity differs from another, or the remainder left after subtracting the one from the other.
  • 23) (Math.) The quantity by which one quantity differs from another, or the remainder left after subtracting the one from the other.
  • 24) (Logic) The quality or attribute which is added to those of the genus to constitute a species; a differentia.
  • 25) obsolete Choice; preference.
  • 26) That by which one thing differs from another; that which distinguishes or causes to differ; mark of distinction; characteristic quality; specific attribute.
  • 27) See under Ascensional.
  • 28) (Her.) An addition to a coat of arms to distinguish the bearings of two persons, which would otherwise be the same. See Augmentation, and Marks of cadency, under Cadency.
  • 29) Disagreement in opinion; dissension; controversy; quarrel; hence, cause of dissension; matter in controversy.
  • 30) (Her.) An addition to a coat of arms to distinguish the bearings of two persons, which would otherwise be the same. See Augmentation, and Marks of cadency, under Cadency.
  • 31) the number that remains after subtraction; the number that when added to the subtrahend gives the minuend
  • 32) a variation that deviates from the standard or norm
  • 33) a disagreement or argument about something important
  • 34) In mathematics, the result of performing the operation of taking the difference once.
  • 35) In heraldry, a bearing used to discriminate between shields or achievements of arms, as of brothers who inherit an equal right to the paternal coat. The most common form of differencing is cadency; another is the baston.
  • 36) A difference between individuals of the same species; a character possessed by one individual and not by the others of the same species. Also frequently called individual, individuant, or singular difference.
  • 37) In mathematics: The quantity by which one quantity differs from another; the remainder of a sum or quantity after a lesser sum or quantity is subtracted.
  • 38) .
  • 39) An evidence or a mark of distinction.
  • 40) Synonyms and Difference, Distinction, Diversity, Dissimilarity, Disparity, Disagreement, Variance, Discrimination, contrariety, dissimilitude, variety. The first five words express the fact of unlikeness; difference and distinction apply also to that wherein the unlikeness lies, and discrimination to the act of making or marking a difference, and to the faculty of discerning differences. (See discernment.) Distinction applies also to the eminence conferred on account of difference. Difference is the most general, applying to things small or great, internal or external. Distinction is generally, but not always, external, and generally marks delicate differences: as, the distinction between two words that are almost synonymous. Diversity, by its derivation, is a great or radical difference, equal to going in opposite directions. Dissimilarity is unlikeness, generally in large degree or essential points. Disparity is inequality, generally in rank or age. Disagreement and variance are weak words by their original meaning, but through euphemistic use have come to stand for dissimilarity of opinion of almost any degree, and for the resulting alienation of feeling, or even dissension and strife.
  • 41) A part or division.
  • 42) The act of distinguishing; discrimination; distinction.
  • 43) [Difference is often followed by a prepositional phrase indicating the things or persons that differ. The preposition is usually between or among, or from, but sometimes also to (after the formula different to: see remarks under different).
  • 44) On the exchanges, the amount of variation between the price at which it is agreed to sell and deliver a thing at a fixed time and the market-price of the thing when that time arrives. In wagering contracts, payment of the difference is expected and accepted in lieu of actual delivery.
  • 45) Any special mode of non-identity; a relation which can subsist only between different things; also, a special relation involving unlikeness; a particular dissimilarity.
  • 46) The condition or relation of being other or different; the relation of non-identity; also, the relation between things unlike; dissimilarity in general.
  • 47) Dissension, contest, falling out, strife, wrangle, altercation.
  • 48) The increment of a function produced by increasing the variable by unity.
  • 49) A character which one thing or kind of things has and another has not.
  • 50) Controversy, or ground of controversy; a dispute; a quarrel.
  • 51) : (transitive) To distinguish or differentiate.
  • 52) To cause a difference or distinction in or between; make different or distinct.
  • 53) In heraldry, to bear with a difference; add a difference to.
  • 54) In mathematics, to take the difference of (a function); also, to compute the successive differences of the numbers in a table.
  • 55) To distinguish; discriminate; note the difference of or between.
  • 56) To distinguish or differentiate.
  • 57) To cause to differ; to make different; to mark as different; to distinguish.

Definitions

  • 1) The willingness to carry out the wishes of others.
  • 2) Great respect.
  • 3) Submission or courteous respect given to another, often in recognition of authority. synonym: honor.
  • 4) Submission or courteous respect given to another, often in recognition of authority. synonym: honor.
  • 5) A yielding of judgment or preference from respect to the wishes or opinion of another; submission in opinion; regard; respect; complaisance.
  • 6) courteous regard for people's feelings
  • 7) a courteous expression (by word or deed) of esteem or regard
  • 8) a disposition or tendency to yield to the will of others
  • 9) A yielding in opinion; submission to the opinion, judgment, or wish of another; hence, regard, respect, or submission in general: as, a blind deference to authority.

Examples

  • 1) That proved the involvement of a legend could make a real difference.
  • 2) This alone will make a huge difference.
  • 3) Some residents are concerned that the patrols have made little difference.
  • 4) You look at love in a wise way and see the difference between flattery and genuine feelings.
  • 5) The players that did come in this time last year made a big difference.
  • 6) You can really make a difference to people 's lives.
  • 7) You'll see a difference with one treatment.
  • 8) Choosing to make a difference locally by helping to organise a charity campaign brings an unexpected love option to light that could add so much excitement.
  • 9) The moon moves into your birth sign and in a quiet but effective way, you get people to resolve their differences and work as a team.
  • 10) You will make a real difference to how you feel.
  • 11) This has made a huge difference to these schools.
  • 12) What a difference little more than a year makes.
  • 13) United are now happy to sit back and see the pair resolve their differences.
  • 14) You can see the difference between learning from the past and letting it hold you back.
  • 15) You see the difference between helping and doing too much for those you care about.
  • 16) The role of quality differences is of special interest.
  • 17) You see the difference between genuine people and those who just talk a good game.
  • 18) Your neck is on the line as a manager which is the biggest difference.
  • 19) There is less difference with women than might have been expected.
  • 20) The difference made by injuries to goal difference adds another layer of complexity.
  • 21) Today there are some crucial differences but one important similarity.
  • 22) There is not a great amount of difference on ability between the four teams.
  • 23) This is unlikely to make much difference.
  • 24) We came here full of ambition but tonight there was a huge difference between the two sides.
  • 25) The only difference was the degree of control they had over their lives.
  • 26) IT'S amazing the difference three little letters can make.
  • 27) The difference between the most expensive and the cheapest areas remains unchanged.
  • 28) There is quite a dramatic size difference between them.
  • 29) There are some real differences between men and women in regard to heart disease.
  • 30) The changes will make a huge difference.
  • 31) Those three days off could make that little bit of difference.
  • 32) He may need negotiation skills to resolve differences between trainees or between trainees and himself.
  • 33) Be sure you see the difference between being strong and stubborn at home.
  • 34) ‘Structural differences between the various drugs account for the differences in the potential side effects.’
  • 35) ‘The differences between the present study and prior work likely represent differences in patient selection.’
  • 36) ‘Therefore differences between the experiments could be attributed to differences in genetic background of the species that are not shared.’
  • 37) ‘The differences between them arise as a result of the differences in strength and density of oceanic and continental lithosphere.’
  • 38) ‘These differences between the two inbred lines may reflect differences in their origin.’
  • 39) ‘The cognitive differences in turn stem from biological differences between males and females.’
  • 40) ‘differences between the two industries in their business organisation were mirrored by differences in labour relations.’
  • 41) ‘Once we start to look at the differences between ourselves and chimps it'll undoubtedly be the differences in these control sequences we'll be interested in.’
  • 42) ‘The differences in circumstances of states within the groups of developed and developing states are in many ways as great as the differences between these groups.’
  • 43) ‘I love all the differences between people in different parts of the country.’
  • 44) ‘The artist ventures to expose the inherent differences in the equation between the strong and the weak, and in the process makes no secret of his bias for the underdog.’
  • 45) ‘differences in society, differences in religious belief and identity are not necessarily a bad thing.’
  • 46) ‘There are socio-economic differences between the generations of my family.’
  • 47) ‘But there was one crucial difference from all the other appeals I'd received.’
  • 48) ‘‘One difference from last season is that we have a greater aerial threat,’ he says.’
  • 49) ‘We will operate within it, of course, but anyone who watches us won't notice any difference from what we were doing this time last year.’
  • 50) ‘One other positive difference from two weeks ago is that the police will have better forensic evidence which they can use.’
  • 51) ‘Another marked difference from the past is the attitude towards marriage.’
  • 52) ‘The most noticeable difference from last time was the lack of the big windows.’
  • 53) ‘The first major difference from a billiard table is that one end is rounded instead of square.’
  • 54) ‘There is in America a sense of distance from other nations, and of difference from them, which has been long remarked and debated.’
  • 55) ‘The question then becomes: how can we free difference from these normative connotations?’
  • 56) ‘A quick click on my archives, and I find that there's not much difference from last Christmas.’
  • 57) ‘The music is an odd blend of soft feminine jazzy folk-rock, with little difference from song to song.’
  • 58) ‘Judging by my experience of American culinary habits, they will notice no difference from home cooking.’
  • 59) ‘Tactics books are readily available, and in many instances there isn't a lot of difference from one to the next.’
  • 60) ‘Certainly, you can think that there is no difference from other sports when you refer to the rules of the game.’
  • 61) ‘It's a world of difference from last year, when I could only hope to turn a few heads.’
  • 62) ‘I had never driven a 4X4 before but you don't notice any difference from a normal car except for the height.’
  • 63) ‘In truth I could not notice much difference from my seat near the front.’
  • 64) ‘There is a world of difference from succeeding in South Africa to competing in Bangladesh.’
  • 65) ‘The ugly body is thus a body whose difference from the normal body is turned into deviance.’
  • 66) ‘The attractive power of the church of God lies in its distinctiveness and difference from the world.’
  • 67) ‘But for the boy, a transformation has to be achieved to an awareness of an identity based on difference from the mother.’
  • 68) ‘Well, in point of fact, there's very little difference from its ideological stance.’
  • 69) ‘As someone who has lived in both, I can assure you that there is a world of difference between the two conditions.’
  • 70) ‘Even more importantly, the new government's policies so far show little difference from those of the old.’
  • 71) ‘An election is coming and this is beginning to look like the issue the incumbents can use to show their difference from the opposition.’
  • 72) ‘We retreat into our irony cages when we feel threatened by our difference from other people.’
  • 73) ‘If the antecedent is more true than the consequent, then the conditional is less than the maximal truth by the difference between their values.’
  • 74) ‘The difference between the expected value and the certainty equivalent is the risk premium for the gamble.’
  • 75) ‘It is claimed that there remains a substantial difference between that sum and the full amount of the loss.’
  • 76) ‘The difference of the total amount which is K67 million is what the community has given in terms of labour and materials.’
  • 77) ‘The gap, when taken over the full five years would amount to a total difference of about 7.7%.’
  • 78) ‘The Department of Labour examined data from 2001 when the pay difference was 40 percent.’
  • 79) ‘The difference in wages remained constant, not increasing over time.’
  • 80) ‘For each pixel, find the difference in intensity between each of its neighbors, then sum the absolute value of those differences.’
  • 81) ‘Simple arithmetic will yield the difference between these two amounts.’
  • 82) ‘Quantitatively, the dollar amount differences are shown in Table 4.’
  • 83) ‘Each matrix was constructed by subtracting the differences in values between populations.’
  • 84) ‘However, the 9 percent difference in speed has remained constant over the years.’
  • 85) ‘Or alternatively, will the difference in real value and actual rental paid be deducted from his salary?’
  • 86) ‘All of the previously observed statistical differences remained when the data were corrected for percentage activation.’
  • 87) ‘The index of divergence is expressed in the sum of the absolute value of the differences for all industries.’
  • 88) ‘He notices that It looks like the differences seem to be ‘copying’ the Fibonacci series in the tens and in the units columns.’
  • 89) ‘However, the values of energy differences are overestimated.’
  • 90) ‘Whenever differences are observed, values are tabulated separately for contact lipids.’
  • 91) ‘The clinical relevance of weighted mean differences and P values, however, is not obvious.’
  • 92) ‘He was paid a settlement of salary difference from last April to November on top of three months' salary in lieu of notice.’
  • 93) ‘Naturally, we will have our differences and our disputes, but we must be especially wary of the tendency to cast them in terms of a fictitious religious strife.’
  • 94) ‘Governments are often beset by internal divisions and dispute, but such differences have traditionally been over politics or policy.’
  • 95) ‘In a voluntary society like the church we rely heavily on the ties that bind us together as the body of Christ as a way of resolving our differences and disputes.’
  • 96) ‘Do you ever find yourselves playing out other differences or disagreements you may have with each other through the football difference between you?’
  • 97) ‘They just seem to be able to deal with differences and disagreements in ways that don't interfere with getting the job done.’
  • 98) ‘We can imagine a private quarrel between two people or two groups whose differences are based upon misunderstandings.’
  • 99) ‘Another disagreement is on the more obvious public level: regional disagreements and differences over ancestral origin.’
  • 100) ‘He goes on to list disagreements and differences of opinion among priests on all these topics.’
  • 101) ‘All disputes or differences arising out of this contract which cannot be amicably resolved shall be referred to arbitration in London.’
  • 102) ‘The Army and the Navy were not able to solve their differences during World War II.’
  • 103) ‘Ending three decades of enmity, the two visionaries shelved Cold War differences to unite against a growing Soviet threat.’
  • 104) ‘Let's keep the psychology and rhetoric of argument in mind while we debate our differences.’
  • 105) ‘No doubt, these differences will be patched up, and then, perhaps in a year's time, we the Irish people will be asked to vote on this Constitution.’
  • 106) ‘They seem to have patched up their differences, now, though.’
  • 107) ‘They've patched up their differences now though, meeting in Brisbane today.’
  • 108) ‘Family quarrels and personal differences, too, often have a hefty measure of the same thing.’
  • 109) ‘The couple have been together seven years and married in October last year after patching up their differences.’
  • 110) ‘Even if the two of them patch up their differences for public consumption, they have surely gone past the point of no return.’
  • 111) ‘The battles between the British kids and their Gibraltarian counterparts of Spanish ethnic origin had nothing to do with political differences over the war, he says.’
  • 112) ‘It puts the House and the Senate in sharp conflict over the issue of immigration and sets up a fierce battle over resolving their differences.’

Examples

  • 1) This royal wedding showed that deference for our top tribe has gone.
  • 2) They both showed an unquestioning deference to the police.
  • 3) In contrast he showed very little deference to rank or position.
  • 4) He showed a pleasant deference to the older man.
  • 5) She is the sort of woman whom one cannot regard with too much deference.
  • 6) So there was a family feeling extended to the clergy, as well as respect and deference.
  • 7) This is a relatively low bar that gives deference to the Congress.
  • 8) When he was present she was more careful in speaking, and showed more deference to her mother.
  • 9) I have learnt that sport is expected to pay deference to the real world.
  • 10) Similarly, it is extremely important if you are dealing with any government employee or politician to give due deference.
  • 11) This reflects wider Pakistan society, in which age is given deference and opportunity.
  • 12) ‘Elizabeth II came to the throne when Britain still enjoyed a society where deference joined with self respect.’
  • 13) ‘The prisoners were all perfectly submissive and paid every deference to the wishes of those in whose custody they were placed.’
  • 14) ‘Even when this process is taking place, there is still a battle against old ideas and the habits of deference and submission.’
  • 15) ‘But our relationship should be one of mature partnership not one of undue deference.’
  • 16) ‘In a previous era he'd have been a gardener on a large estate, and still retains all of his deference to people he considers his betters.’
  • 17) ‘The judgment made by the defendant as the primary decision maker should be accorded due deference by the court.’
  • 18) ‘They must give due deference to the decisions of the inspectors and the Secretary of State.’
  • 19) ‘But a loss of deference is very different from a loss of respect for other people.’
  • 20) ‘In his view, the article requires respect for family life not automatic deference to family decisions.’
  • 21) ‘Already their experiment shows signs of failure, and that in a society notable for its deference to authority and tradition.’
  • 22) ‘It was those very values of deference, place and the proper order of things which brought this country to the brink of collapse after the war.’
  • 23) ‘An embarrassing four-year period of media deference to the president and his policies has ended.’
  • 24) ‘In coming to terms with this situation, teachers need to accept the loss of some traditional deference.’
  • 25) ‘For a court to do otherwise is for a court to fail to show proper deference to a legislative authority.’
  • 26) ‘He confirms this shyly, perhaps out of deference to his employer, who trained with White and later became his great rival.’
  • 27) ‘What has almost disappeared is deference towards the lower classes.’
  • 28) ‘Traditional class boundaries have been eroded and deference has all but disappeared from British society.’
  • 29) ‘It was typical of a Queen who, in her own words, thoroughly disliked pomposity and ritual deference.’
  • 30) ‘Arrogance is not an attractive trait, but surely it beats passive deference?’
  • 31) ‘The wasn't much sign of deference either, the shouted questions were pretty direct.’
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