boy vs buoy

boy buoy

Definitions

  • 1) Male servant.
  • 2) A male child.
  • 3) Often Offensive A man, especially a young man.
  • 4) Informal A man socializing in a group of men.
  • 5) Offensive A male servant or employee.
  • 6) Often Offensive A man, especially a young man.
  • 7) A son.
  • 8) Offensive A male servant or employee.
  • 9) Informal A man socializing in a group of men.
  • 10) [Slang] the Devil.
  • 11) a popular English name of Southernwood (Artemisia abrotonum); -- called also lad's love.
  • 12) A male child, from birth to the age of puberty; a lad; hence, a son.
  • 13) [Slang] the Devil.
  • 14) childish amusements; anything trifling.
  • 15) a boy (usually a chorister) elected bishop, in old Christian sports, and invested with robes and other insignia. He practiced a kind of mimicry of the ceremonies in which the bishop usually officiated.
  • 16) derog. In various countries, a male servant, laborer, or slave of a native or inferior race; also, any man of such a race; -- considered derogatory by those so called, and now seldom used.
  • 17) derog. In various countries, a male servant, laborer, or slave of a native or inferior race; also, any man of such a race; -- considered derogatory by those so called, and now seldom used.
  • 18) [Slang, Eng.] guineas.
  • 19) [Slang, Eng.] guineas.
  • 20) (ethnic slur) offensive and disparaging term for Black man
  • 21) a youthful male person
  • 22) a male human offspring
  • 23) a friendly informal reference to a grown man
  • 24) Specifically, in the United States— In the South, especially before the abolition of slavery, a negro man.
  • 25) An unscrupulous local politician, especially in a large city; one of the managers or subordinates of the “machine” of a party in local politics and elections: as, a ticket not acceptable to the boys.
  • 26) In familiar or playful use (usually in the plural), a grown man regarded as one of the younger members of a family, as an intimate friend or associate, or as having in any respect a boyish relation or character.
  • 27) Roaring boys. See roaring.
  • 28) A male child, from birth to full growth, but especially from the end of infancy to the beginning of youth: also applied to a young man, implying immaturity, want of vigor or judgment, etc.
  • 29) Old boy, a familiar name for the devil.
  • 30) A young servant; a page: as, “boys, grooms, and lackeys,”
  • 31) In India, as far north as the Nerbudda river, a palankin-bearer. Yule and Burnell, Anglo-Ind. Glossary.
  • 32) [Supposed by some to be “a corruption of Hind. bhaiee, a servant”; but the Hind. word, prop. bhāī, means ‘brother,’ and boy in this use is merely the E. word. Cf. boy.] In India and the treaty-ports of China and Japan, etc., a native male servant, especially a personal servant; a butler or waiter, house-boy, office-boy, etc., as distinguished from a coolie or porter: in common use among foreigners.
  • 33) transitive To act as a boy (in allusion to the former practice of boys acting women's parts on the stage).
  • 34) To use the word boy to refer to someone.
  • 35) transitive To act as a boy (in allusion to the former practice of boys acting women's parts on the stage).
  • 36) To act or represent in the manner of a boy: in allusion to the acting by boys of women's parts on the stage.
  • 37) To treat as a boy, or as something belonging to or befitting a boy.
  • 38) To act as a boy; -- in allusion to the former practice of boys acting women's parts on the stage.
  • 39) Exclamation of surprise, pleasure or longing.
  • 40) Used to express mild astonishment, elation, or disgust.

Definitions

  • 1) nautical A float moored in water to mark a location, warn of danger, or indicate a navigational channel.
  • 2) nautical A float moored in water to mark a location, warn of danger, or indicate a navigational channel.
  • 3) A life-buoy.
  • 4) A float moored in water to mark a location, warn of danger, or indicate a navigational channel.
  • 5) A life buoy.
  • 6) a large buoy on which a bell is mounted, to be rung by the motion of the waves.
  • 7) a buoy attached to, or marking the position of, an anchor.
  • 8) to let the anchor buoy fall by the ship's side into the water, before letting go the anchor.
  • 9) a hollow buoy made of sheet or boiler iron, usually conical or pear-shaped.
  • 10) a buoy large in the middle, and tapering nearly to a point at each end.
  • 11) (Naut.) A float; esp. a floating object moored to the bottom, to mark a channel or to point out the position of something beneath the water, as an anchor, shoal, rock, etc.
  • 12) See under Breeches.
  • 13) a buoy fitted with a whistle that is blown by the action of the waves.
  • 14) (Naut.) A float; esp. a floating object moored to the bottom, to mark a channel or to point out the position of something beneath the water, as an anchor, shoal, rock, etc.
  • 15) an empty cask employed to buoy up the cable in rocky anchorage.
  • 16) a float intended to support persons who have fallen into the water, until a boat can be dispatched to save them.
  • 17) bright-colored; a float attached by rope to the seabed to mark channels in a harbor or underwater hazards
  • 18) A buoyant object designed to be thrown from a vessel to assist a person who has fallen into the water to keep himself afloat; a life-buoy.
  • 19) A float fixed at a certain place to show the position of objects beneath the water, as shoals, rocks, etc., to mark out a channel, and the like
  • 20) transitive To mark with a buoy.
  • 21) transitive To mark with a buoy.
  • 22) transitive To support or maintain at a high level.
  • 23) transitive To support or maintain at a high level.
  • 24) transitive To keep afloat or aloft.
  • 25) transitive To keep afloat or aloft.
  • 26) float on the surface of water
  • 27) keep afloat
  • 28) mark with a buoy
  • 29) Figuratively, to support or sustain in any sense; especially, to sustain mentally; keep from falling into despondency or discouragement: generally with up.
  • 30) To fix buoys in as a direction to mariners: as, to buoy or to buoy off a channel.
  • 31) To float; rise by reason of lightness.
  • 32) To support by a buoy or as by a buoy; keep afloat in a fluid; bear up or keep from sinking in a fluid, as in water or air: generally with up.
  • 33) To float; to rise like a buoy.
  • 34) To hearten or inspire; uplift.
  • 35) To mark with or as if with a buoy.
  • 36) To maintain at a high level; support.
  • 37) To keep afloat or aloft.
  • 38) To keep from sinking in a fluid, as in water or air; to keep afloat; -- with up.
  • 39) To support or sustain; to preserve from sinking into ruin or despondency.
  • 40) To fix buoys to; to mark by a buoy or by buoys.

Examples

  • 1) If we think about ˜every boy sang™ analogously, ˜boy™ is the internal argument of
  • 2) This boy I started to talk to before I was dating * the boy* ...
  • 3) I say to you, mother, and oh, so earnestly: 'Go teach your boy that which you may never be ashamed to do, about these organs that make him _specially a boy_.'
  • 4) Here “puer, ” boy, and “Displicent, ” displease or annoy, seem to determine, not merely the first rhyme, but the rhyme arrangement (a, a), and it needs but a glance at the close of the first stanza of the original to show that another word rhyming with “boy” would be hard to obtain.
  • 5) In the sentence _The boy who wastes his time does not study_, the words _who wastes his time_ form an adjective clause modifying _boy_, and the sentence is complex.
  • 6) In _The boy wasting his time does not study_, the words _wasting his time_ form an adjective phrase modifying _boy_.
  • 7) Périque of Octave Roussel, w'at dey use call 'im Chat-oué; [2] but he git tired dat name, and now he got lil boy 'bout twenny-five year' ole, an 'dey call de ole man Catou, an' call his lil _boy_ Chat-oué.
  • 8) A starving boy, he roamed the streets of Florence; and the widespread intelligence of the city is marked by Browning's account of the way in which the _boy_ observed all the life of the streets for eight years.
  • 9) "boy, boy, _boy_!" called the old lady in a voice so entreating, though tremulous, that Bobby felt constrained to return.
  • 10) ‘It trades on facile ideas about city and country, youth and age, boys and girls.’
  • 11) ‘There were old and young people, little boys and girls, teenagers and babies in prams.’
  • 12) ‘The council is now made up of six boys and girls, all teenagers.’
  • 13) ‘Last month, the club organized a 15-day special shooting camp for both boys and girls aged six years and above.’
  • 14) ‘Police are hunting six yobs - three boys and three girls - aged around 15.’
  • 15) ‘Twenty six boys and girls received their first Holy Communion last Saturday.’
  • 16) ‘The pair were among six contestants - three boys and three girls - who had only a few minutes to get to know each other.’
  • 17) ‘This is mainly aimed at children, both boys and girls, between the ages of six and 12.’
  • 18) ‘There are about five or six boys and girls all begging in the area in and around Ae Gams and Mini Market in Sam Nujoma Avenue in Windhoek.’
  • 19) ‘There are six women and about six boys and girls in the pit I work in; it is very hard work for a woman.’
  • 20) ‘The nine boys and six girls that sat before him greeted him in their different ways.’
  • 21) ‘The number of pupils needed to be taught for one more pupil to know the correct time limits was six for boys and five for girls.’
  • 22) ‘Seeing the children walk to school every day, boys and girls, is a sight that shows daily success.’
  • 23) ‘There will be major parts for nine small children - seven girls and two boys, and minor parts for up to ten more.’
  • 24) ‘Congratulations to all the infant boys and girls that started in Kill National School last week.’
  • 25) ‘Young girls and boys (the pupils) were being interviewed in a police station with ad hoc interpreters.’
  • 26) ‘The Summer Camp are open to all young players, boys and girls, between the ages of 8 and 16.’
  • 27) ‘I understand that there is a huge upswing in the sales of hair colourants, especially for the younger girls and boys.’
  • 28) ‘Young girls and boys in army uniforms do ceremonial duties.’
  • 29) ‘One night as I was tucking the boys into bed, I noticed how much longer their legs seemed since our arrival.’
  • 30) ‘Instead of cajoling the boys into bed around 8pm, Garfield now makes sure both are tucked up by 6.30.’
  • 31) ‘She tucked the boys into their beds, read them a story and sat with them till they fell asleep.’
  • 32) ‘His sons are still little boys, and he takes them out in a boat on the estuary.’
  • 33) ‘The Benn boys were descended from politicians on both sides of the family.’
  • 34) ‘Of course the rest of the family, wife and two teenage boys are still in bed in denial of the work that looms ahead.’
  • 35) ‘Father and son, the boy would be 8 or 9, he may be 10, we don't know, who cares anyway?’
  • 36) ‘She wants the right to have her son, the boy she tried to drown, visit her in prison.’
  • 37) ‘Hence the father had quite different plans for the boy; but the son persisted and at last had his way.’
  • 38) ‘Russell Crowe has written a heartfelt open letter to his baby son to mark the boy's first birthday.’
  • 39) ‘Within six hours their baby boy was fighting for his life in intensive care, covered in a dark bruise-like rash.’
  • 40) ‘My Mother was the last of ten children, six boys and four girls.’
  • 41) ‘She has three foster children, two boys and one girl, aged five, six and 14.’
  • 42) ‘Bernhard was the second of their six children, two boys and four girls.’
  • 43) ‘Sister Constance was one of seven children, six girls and a boy, born in Essex.’
  • 44) ‘The couple have three teenage children, two boys and a girl.’
  • 45) ‘The other children, a boy and a girl aged nine and six respectively, are both in grade six.’
  • 46) ‘She made it waterproof so it would float, and then placed her dear baby boy into it.’
  • 47) ‘She was deeply moved by the recent death of her friend's baby boy.’
  • 48) ‘I am his sole carer and his mother; he is my little boy and my best friend.’
  • 49) ‘Opperman initially worked as a bicycle messenger and telegram boy.’
  • 50) ‘She stood at the front door watching the delivery boy hop back on his bicycle and peddle away.’
  • 51) ‘He is busy juggling being a pizza delivery boy, a physics student and a superhero.’
  • 52) ‘Una sets off to cycle the moors with Ray, the ex-fish and milk delivery boy who now works as a railway guard.’
  • 53) ‘It is important to become a professional sales person rather than a postman or delivery boy or a traditional sales man.’
  • 54) ‘Besides training regularly with his dad, Roy, James also pounds the miles as a newspaper delivery boy for the Evening Press.’
  • 55) ‘Another catches a pizza delivery boy dropping the pizza and hurriedly putting it back in the box before handing it over.’
  • 56) ‘When the Manchester Evening News delivery boy found that a pensioner on his round had been robbed he decided to cheer her up.’
  • 57) ‘Jack, of beanstalk fame, makes his fortune as a newspaper delivery boy in this new twist on some old fairy tales.’
  • 58) ‘To top it all off, a telegram delivery boy runs in to deliver messages every so often.’
  • 59) ‘A tenner for the binman and a fiver for the newspaper delivery boy are relics of Christmas past.’
  • 60) ‘The musical loosely based on the true story of the New York newspaper boy strike of 1899.’
  • 61) ‘Mr King, who was a bread delivery boy, was handed the child after its father collapsed in front of him in Old Tye Avenue, Biggin Hill.’
  • 62) ‘Two years ago, the youngster took up a job as a newspaper delivery boy to supplement his mother's earnings.’
  • 63) ‘When I reached the door the redheaded acne covered pizza delivery boy looked very put out.’
  • 64) ‘At thirteen he took a job as a newspaper and book delivery boy.’
  • 65) ‘She locks herself in her room, listening to rap music and ignoring everyone except the pizza delivery boy.’
  • 66) ‘Processed to see what his ideal job position would be, Fry is classified as an ideal delivery boy.’
  • 67) ‘The sale had been effected by a messenger boy who had no authority to sell liquor or anything else.’
  • 68) ‘As I opened the door I saw the delivery boys were a group of young men laughing and joking.’
  • 69) ‘Like the late Nick Drake, local boy Summers seems too fragile a creature to last very long on this planet.’
  • 70) ‘It is not hard to see why local boy Steinbeck loved this place despite his depiction of the harshness meted out to some.’
  • 71) ‘It will be fantastic for the young kids in Keighley to see a local boy playing in rugby league's showpiece.’
  • 72) ‘A magnificent photo he took of a crying local boy was run on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald and the Age.’
  • 73) ‘This Christmas, which Matt spent on the Ivory Coast, a local boy got sick and nobody knew what was wrong with him.’
  • 74) ‘He is a local boy, made good; his rise to prominence begun on the back of that most Scottish of virtues - education.’
  • 75) ‘Now, my son's a Texas boy, and had he found the car, someone would have been boot kicked.’
  • 76) ‘Perhaps as a backlash against political intolerance, frat boy chic now appears to be king.’
  • 77) ‘Elvis would never have been able get his mouth around all that college boy wordplay.’
  • 78) ‘You were few and far between, but it was worth the wait - if you're into that whole surfer grungy tanned beach boy look.’
  • 79) ‘He could not handle the fact that bovver boy threats and intimidation failed to shut us up.’
  • 80) ‘He has the looks of the Sixth Former and the body of a Greek Adonis with an innocent farm boy look in his eye.’
  • 81) ‘She was probably the only person to ever see that his eyes were hazel and know that his hair had once been beach boy blonde.’
  • 82) ‘Gregarious and jovial to the point of being manic, his movies are excuses for unforced frat boy fun.’
  • 83) ‘But the stories of avarice and greed and frat boy idiocy are only a part of the tale.’
  • 84) ‘The quiet Spanish country boy saw off the experienced American in the Pyrenees and then confirmed his win against the clock.’
  • 85) ‘Don't get me wrong, he was a nice guy, he was just nice in the small town naïve frat boy way.’
  • 86) ‘Johansson and Christensen fare worse, though, with frat boy fantasies for characters.’
  • 87) ‘George sensitively edited her new manuscript and mourned the absence of his lover, a French sailor boy.’
  • 88) ‘They shouted at the crazy little slave boy who smiled in the face of death.’
  • 89) ‘Mincing up to the two new boys on the team and asking, ‘Have you killed before?’ might seem a little abrupt.’
  • 90) ‘As photographs emerged of British soldiers torturing prisoners - not our dear British boys!’
  • 91) ‘Good, experienced players were omitted from the World Cup squad and the new boys didn't deliver.’
  • 92) ‘However, four games into the new season and Manchester United are looking strong in the second place position, behind new boys Bolton.’
  • 93) ‘My dear boy - in England some of still have a drink or two at lunch even on a working day.’
  • 94) ‘Pentheus, my dear boy, some cruel insanity-jealousy perhaps has warped your mind.’
  • 95) ‘Wheels of fate have already begun to turn my dear boy, ones that can no longer be stopped.’
  • 96) ‘Events, dear boy, events, prevented me posting as much as I would have liked.’
  • 97) ‘As for those innocent people who'll end up being detained: details, dear boy, details.’
  • 98) ‘That's but a legend dear boy, a story told to children in their beds.’
  • 99) ‘Bad dog! Down boy!’
  • 100) ‘So during arrests he'd be yelling "Down boy! Down boy!" at the dog and journalists wrote about how hard the officer tried to get the dog off the criminal.’
  • 101) ‘Sit! Good boy!’
  • 102) ‘We managed to clean up before we called for help so as not to look conspicuous but, boy!’
  • 103) ‘Freddy vs Jason is the battle you've been waiting to see and, boy, does it raise the bar on excitement!’
  • 104) ‘A bitter and biting December day in Balerno is no place for niceties and, boy, did these two teams not show us any niceties.’
  • 105) ‘That's why I hope the two of them split it because, boy, you will see whining and crying then.’
  • 106) ‘I don't know how his parents knew when they named him that, but, boy, they got that right.’
  • 107) ‘They ran on stage, as you saw, tried to pelt her with pies, but, boy, she was fast.’
  • 108) ‘The flowers are large and weigh down the stems of the shrub, especially after a shower - but, boy, are they worth the wait.’
  • 109) ‘The next day, I arranged for a group of us to lunch at one and, boy, what a disappointment.’
  • 110) ‘The popularity of the established parties is being seriously questioned by voters and, boy, they don't like it.’
  • 111) ‘Granted, the sun shone all weekend, but Blackpool has most definitely had a bit of a spruce up and, boy, has it scrubbed up well.’
  • 112) ‘When I was a teenager, fanzines were my primary literary outlet - and, boy, did I have fun!’
  • 113) ‘High, sculpted cheekbones, large, dark eyes and, boy, could she pack a punch.’
  • 114) ‘There is a certain type of china that is only ever found in old ladies' houses and, boy, I now have plenty to spare.’
  • 115) ‘Weimar is this year's European capital of culture and, boy, does it have culture.’
  • 116) ‘It may have been the right thing to do but, boy, was it ever a stupid political move.’
  • 117) ‘It was courageous to run the last tackle on the short side but, boy, did it pay off.’
  • 118) ‘For the first time, there was a woman doing a man's job and, boy, did she let them know it.’
  • 119) ‘It will take a bit longer to make but, boy, is it worth it.’
  • 120) ‘The Feds say that he wanted to show the flaws in U.S. airline security, and, boy, did he ever.’
  • 121) ‘boy, oh boy, was I happy!’

Examples

  • 1) buoyed by his success he became more autocratic.
  • 2) The couple are also buoyed by the outpouring of support they receive from their neighbours.
  • 3) That news buoyed banks and insurers across the board.
  • 4) Good news on the economy has buoyed investor confidence.
  • 5) Prices are also being buoyed by a lack of properties.
  • 6) Mining stocks were also buoyed by rising commodity prices.
  • 7) Business was also buoyed by signs that access to credit is finally improving.
  • 8) Commodities were buoyed by recovery hopes on both sides of the Atlantic.
  • 9) They were also buoyed by the management's belief that prospects beyond next year appear more promising.
  • 10) Stocks are also being buoyed by a wave of mergers, which has boosted sentiment.
  • 11) buoyed by the success of their purchases, the twins have decided to make a business of it.
  • 12) buoyed with the news of a lifetime of good luck, we set out on foot across the arid ochre.
  • 13) The data buoyed hope that trade will not hamper economic growth as it did in last year's final quarter.
  • 14) Always buoyed up by hope.
  • 15) buoyed by her success with the two Afghan women, she vowed not to give up.
  • 16) If economics were all that mattered, an embarrassment like this would have destroyed the party's hopes rather than buoyed them.
  • 17) Traders were buoyed by a rise in US factory output and a jump in Chinese manufacturing.
  • 18) buoyed by my success with the paintings, I decided to go along in person.
  • 19) A buoy is tossed over the rail but the captain refuses to hard down the helm and send a boat to rescue.
  • 20) A lot of times, it's a two-loop swim, and the turn buoy is only 300 yards away.
  • 21) The flag of the first buoy is scarlet and the ball is under the flag.
  • 22) You can see there is this buoy, which is basically kind of washed ashore.
  • 23) The Bluewater Revolution - From the article: The buoy is the antenna, eyes, and brain of a sprawling apparatus suspended beneath the surface like a huge aquatic insect, its legs of thick steel chain tethered to the ocean floor.
  • 24) Yes, that was the sound of the bell hung from within the cage-like framework surrounding the buoy, which is moored on the edge of the shoal skirting the fairway leading into Portsmouth Harbour.
  • 25) Inside the buoy was a capsule marked 'Andree's Polar Expedition,' containing a slip of paper, on which was given the following: 'Drifting buoy No. 7.
  • 26) Not till August 31st was there picked up in the Arctic zone a buoy, which is preserved in the Museum of Stockholm.
  • 27) ‘At Carval Rock we tie off to a mooring buoy bolted into the reef at 15m.’
  • 28) ‘Your July cover caption reflects that the Star Flyer is ‘gliding peacefully through the Aegean Sea’ when she actually rests at anchor, tied between two mooring buoys.’
  • 29) ‘Nine fixed navigation aids and five buoys are scheduled to replace them by mid 2004.’
  • 30) ‘The dive site is marked by mooring buoys in the bay before Cabo Cope.’
  • 31) ‘First, two experienced divers armed with buoys marked the reef and the area which needed to be cleaned.’
  • 32) ‘The association is in the planning stages of setting up mooring buoys at the more visited sites like Pantai Merah, Padar Island, and Cannibal Rock.’
  • 33) ‘Permanent mooring buoys are provided at all diving sites, and these are colour-coded to denote whether they are for use by local dive schools or by private boats.’
  • 34) ‘Modern, well-equipped dive boats leave every day for different sites, all 60 of which have mooring buoys.’
  • 35) ‘It's encouraging to see that there are only two other dive boats on the wall and the mooring buoys are well spaced out.’
  • 36) ‘Offshore, there are a host of marine navigation aids such as floating and fixed buoys and lighthouses - each with special icons so you can identify them easily.’
  • 37) ‘According to the plan, white buoys would designate coral reefs and sea preservative areas.’
  • 38) ‘The thief had apparently let the stern anchor go and had marked it with a buoy, giving the impression that the boat would be back shortly.’
  • 39) ‘Newry and Mourne Council are providing necessary navigation buoys in the Clanrye River estuary from Narrow Water to the Victoria.’
  • 40) ‘The mooring buoy grid itself will be safer and far more compact than the present anchoring arrangements and will leave plenty of space for other boats to anchor.’
  • 41) ‘At the same time, a mooring buoy design competition, with cash awards, was held in the villages of the park.’
  • 42) ‘Accumulations of zebra mussels clog municipal water systems, and have even been known to sink navigational buoys by their combined weight alone.’
  • 43) ‘Two new navigation buoys will be provided in the channel and alterations are to be carried out on existing navigation lights.’
  • 44) ‘The wreck is marked by a buoy attached to a big concrete mooring block off the stern.’
  • 45) ‘To safely navigate a boat, one has to be able to see and identify day marks, buoys and the occasional sign for the restaurant we want to visit.’
  • 46) ‘Having achieved this, the fishermen then returned to the marker buoy to retrieve the anchor.’
  • 47) ‘It floated really well (I imagine all the hairs trap air and buoy it up), and was making what looked to be good progress by padding with all eight legs.’
  • 48) ‘We suddenly noticed he was missing and ran around looking for him, before looking out to sea and seeing him floating, buoyed up by the air in his nappy.’
  • 49) ‘Instead he presented them as wallowers, being buoyed up by water, feeding on soft marsh vegetation.’
  • 50) ‘Inflatable dive jackets marked with Tom and Eileen's names were later washed ashore north of Port Douglas, along with their tanks - still buoyed up by a few remnants of air - and one of Eileen's fins.’
  • 51) ‘They are then put on boats and rowed out on to the lake, anchored with rocks and buoyed up by plastic pop bottles, which act as floats.’
  • 52) ‘Spaced almost evenly a foot or so from one another, dozens upon dozens of the three-inch-long frogs float with their legs extended, hind legs buoyed apart, and snouts above water.’
  • 53) ‘Above me I could see the colorful silken envelopes, ballooning and buoyed upward by the hot air of the hundred fires that were continually stoked by the slaves of the formidable skyship.’
  • 54) ‘Owls hooted in the trees as the tide on Boston Harbor buoyed a fleet of small rowboats toward Cambridge Shore.’
  • 55) ‘They all watch in fear and fascination as Cal soars for a miraculous moment more, buoyed on the wind's strong shoulder.’
  • 56) ‘Twenty-four hours ago, I was buoyed by the confidence of having three plates fiercely spinning.’
  • 57) ‘Some described false confidence as the ultimate fair-weather friend, buoying you when times are good and deserting you when they're bad.’
  • 58) ‘Despite the increased friction between the two sides, morale among IT staff remains high, with striking workers buoyed by messages of support from council colleagues and members of the public.’
  • 59) ‘But then, for vast periods of this game, their opponents were irresistibly confident, buoyed by their clear superiority.’
  • 60) ‘She thinks they must be restaurant reviews and this buoys her spirits since she imagines it must mean the food is good.’
  • 61) ‘Reynaud himself seemed buoyed up with hope on hearing the proposal.’
  • 62) ‘Peter swelled with pride at her assessment of his manners, buoyed up by the thought of her approval and happiness.’
  • 63) ‘The United States won a significant victory and, buoyed up by a public opinion that seems to hear no evil and see no evil, looks determined to press on and try and score others.’
  • 64) ‘Feeling part of a larger community of like-minded nonviolent protestors, I felt buoyed up by the possibility of triumph over injustice.’
  • 65) ‘Grateful that I'd been allowed into this space, I finally moved on, returning to my mundane tasks of the day, but buoyed up by this close encounter.’
  • 66) ‘They said they felt so buoyed up as they were such a great bunch of students.’
  • 67) ‘It still took a last gasp goal to save Erin's Own, but the certainty is they'll return to the fray on Saturday all buoyed up.’
  • 68) ‘We were flying and we came ashore jubilant and buoyed up.’
  • 69) ‘Then, buoyed up by the thought that I had actually done something, I went out to do some gentle gardening, trimming the grassy edges along the back fence.’
  • 70) ‘For today's leaders buoyed up by the passing cloud of rhetoric, its literary strength makes it likely its findings will be quoted for many years to come.’
  • 71) ‘She is raring to go at the moment, buoyed up by her unexpected win in the Snack-a-Jacks sponsored competition, but admits that maintaining her interest could be a problem.’
  • 72) ‘The tidal wave of marchers which swept through the streets in a never-ending flow, whistled, drummed and chanted its way around the city, buoyed up by a seemingly endless supply of good humour.’
  • 73) ‘That said, he is in an exceptionally sweet mood today, buoyed up by Friday's release of his new film, Angela's Ashes, and, I'd say, not exactly dismayed by the controversy it has generated.’
  • 74) ‘Jestine, who was a teacher herself long ago, was all buoyed up on seeing the kids.’
  • 75) ‘But he warmed to his subject, and was clearly buoyed up by the crowd's enthusiasm.’
  • 76) ‘A&L's share price anyway seems to have been buoyed up by the prospect of predators in the wings, when it becomes prey at the end of the month.’
  • 77) ‘Shares in the bank have been buoyed up by the news, which has sparked speculation of a takeover.’
  • 78) ‘When the economy began the descent into recession in the late 1980s, property prices continued to rise, buoyed by an interest rate cut designed to revive the economy in the wake of the 1987 stock market plunge.’
  • 79) ‘Also buoying the market were strong gains in the heavyweight financial and oil sectors and by London's close the FTSE 100 had pulled past the 3900 level, up 47.0 points at 3936.9.’
  • 80) ‘Heavyweights such as insurers, banks and telecoms had helped buoy the market.’
  • 81) ‘The Shenzhen-based company, China's second biggest life insurer, said a rate increase in the mainland should in fact buoy its investment returns.’
  • 82) ‘With equity withdrawal accounting for 50% of the growth in consumption, these flows have helped significantly to buoy the economy.’
  • 83) ‘It claims that increased custom from the ‘once a week’ pub-goer - the largest group of pub patrons - would buoy profits.’
  • 84) ‘It is a fact that Zambia has the potential to develop its tourism sector fully so that it can quickly buoy the economy because of the vast natural resources.’
  • 85) ‘Some claim the government's transport policy is still in disarray and that this is also helping to buoy sales.’
  • 86) ‘This obviously buoys the market in good times and smooths its falls in recessions.’
  • 87) ‘Much of the bond rally now is built on exaggerated fears of deflation and unrealistic hopes that the Fed will buoy the market by buying bonds.’
  • 88) ‘The ‘survivalists’ are certainly doing their share to buoy the gold market.’
  • 89) ‘But the real estate market is always quite cyclical, and a catalyst will usually come along to buoy markets again.’
  • 90) ‘On the one hand, a stock that is moving up can gather momentum, as ‘success breeds success’ and popularity buoys the stock higher.’
  • 91) ‘Sales of new higher-margin models, including the $128,000 Turbo convertible and $93,000 Carrera 4S convertible, are buoying sales and profits.’
  • 92) ‘Reports earlier this week showed jobless claims dropped and manufacturing rose, buoying the dollar.’
  • 93) ‘A slightly revised model has just gone on sale, which should help to buoy sales as the year progresses.’
  • 94) ‘Stocks spent most of the day in positive territory, buoyed in part by the University of Michigan's report showing consumer confidence rose in March to 95.8 from 94.4 in February.’
  • 95) ‘Overseas, bull runs in Asia have buoyed foreign stock funds.’
  • 96) ‘You'll never see more than one dive boat on any site and they're all buoyed.’
  • 97) ‘The mine was towed some two miles off Methil and lowered to the sea bed and buoyed off.’
  • 98) ‘One of the most striking scenes portrays various fishing vessels buoyed to the wharf in the harbor with the lighthouse in the background.’
  • 99) ‘Skipper Dave dryly remarks that he isn't so sure about this one, as it lies on a flat sandy seabed close to a small reef and he doesn't have it buoyed.’
  • 100) ‘The area was heavily netted, buoyed and mined and constantly being patrolled.’
  • 101) ‘The harbour authority incurred expense in lighting and buoying the wreck which it sought to recover from the defendants.’
  • 102) We saw a buoy in the sea
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy