auger vs augur

auger augur

Definitions

  • 1) A hollow drill used to take core samples of soil, ice, etc. for scientific study.
  • 2) A tool used to bore holes in the ground, e.g. for fence posts
  • 3) A snake or plumber's snake (plumbing tool).
  • 4) A carpenter's tool for boring holes larger than those bored by a gimlet.
  • 5) A machine having a helical flange attached to a rotating shaft, used for drilling and boring or as a conveyor of loose material.
  • 6) Any of various hand tools, typically having a threaded shank and cross handle, used for boring holes in wood or ice.
  • 7) The rotating shaft and flange of such a machine, considered as a single unit.
  • 8) A drill bit.
  • 9) a bit with a cutting edge or blade like that of an anger.
  • 10) A carpenter's tool for boring holes larger than those bored by a gimlet. It has a handle placed crosswise by which it is turned with both hands. A pod auger is one with a straight channel or groove, like the half of a bean pod. A screw auger has a twisted blade, by the spiral groove of which the chips are discharge.
  • 11) An instrument for boring or perforating soils or rocks, for determining the quality of soils, or the nature of the rocks or strata upon which they lie, and for obtaining water.
  • 12) hand tool for boring holes
  • 13) a long flexible steel coil for dislodging stoppages in curved pipes
  • 14) An instrument for boring the soil.
  • 15) An instrument for boring holes larger than those bored by a bit or gimlet.
  • 16) To use an auger; to drill a hole using an auger.
  • 17) To drill, bore, or convey using an auger.

Definitions

  • 1) An official who interpreted omens before the start of public events.
  • 2) A diviner who foretells events by the behaviour of birds or other animals, or by signs derived from celestial phenomena, or unusual occurrences.
  • 3) A seer or prophet; a soothsayer.
  • 4) One of a group of ancient Roman religious officials who foretold events by observing and interpreting signs and omens.
  • 5) (Rom. Antiq.) An official diviner who foretold events by the singing, chattering, flight, and feeding of birds, or by signs or omens derived from celestial phenomena, certain appearances of quadrupeds, or unusual occurrences.
  • 6) (Rom. Antiq.) An official diviner who foretold events by the singing, chattering, flight, and feeding of birds, or by signs or omens derived from celestial phenomena, certain appearances of quadrupeds, or unusual occurrences.
  • 7) One who foretells events by omens; a soothsayer; a diviner; a prophet.
  • 8) (ancient Rome) a religious official who interpreted omens to guide public policy
  • 9) Hence One who pretends to foretell future events by omens; a soothsayer; a prophet; one who bodes, forebodes, or portends.
  • 10) Among the ancient Romans, a functionary whose duty it was to observe and to interpret, according to traditional rules, the auspices, or reputed natural signs concerning future events.
  • 11) To foretell events; to exhibit signs of future events.
  • 12) indicate by signs
  • 13) predict from an omen
  • 14) To betoken; forebode: with a non-personal or impersonal subject.
  • 15) To prognosticate from signs, omens, or indications; predict; anticipate: with a personal subject.
  • 16) To be a sign; bode: with well or ill.
  • 17) To conjecture from signs or omens.
  • 18) Synonyms To portend, presage, foreshadow, be ominous of.
  • 19) To make predictions from signs or omens.
  • 20) To predict, especially from signs or omens; foretell. synonym: foretell.
  • 21) To predict, especially from signs or omens; foretell. synonym: foretell.
  • 22) To serve as an omen of; betoken.
  • 23) To be a sign or omen.
  • 24) To conjecture from signs or omens; to prognosticate; to foreshow.
  • 25) To anticipate, to foretell, or to indicate a favorable or an unfavorable issue.
  • 26) To predict or foretell, as from signs or omens; to betoken; to presage; to infer.

Examples

  • 1) `The auger Llew is talking about is a bore, like most of the soothsayers you studied in your Latin prose.
  • 2) He rolled the metal snake around a spindle, telling her, "Go get me the power auger.
  • 3) The auger was a twisted pile of scrap in the ditch and the tractor was headed home unscratched.
  • 4) The basic idea is to find the cleanouts, and run a snake (aka auger) into them. powered one with knives.
  • 5) While the lint is going through this process, the seeds, being heavier and smaller, draw to the bottom of the gins, fall into an auger which is operated by a belt, and then are dropped into a conveyor and carried to the seed pile or houses.
  • 6) Poor scores for removal speed, throwing distance, and clearing plow piles like at the end of driveways put it at dead-last among single-stage snow blowers, which use a rubber-tipped auger to scoop up and throw snow while helping move the machine.
  • 7) As long as Ares I-X doesn't do a 180 at liftoff and auger into the pad, Constellation can declare victory.
  • 8) He had made a large framework, which was put together by drilling holes with an auger and then fastening them together with pegs.
  • 9) Q: where can i get a blade fo a 10 Ice King 3hp power auger. any help would be awsome!!
  • 10) Twisting his ice auger—essentially a four-foot corkscrew—he drilled a new hole through the ice.
  • 11) ‘This boring article presents a few of the many interesting variants in wood boring augers and twist bits.’
  • 12) ‘A spoon auger used to bore holes into wood.’
  • 13) ‘A common method was to bore a hole in the barrel using any of a variety of bung borers, boring taps, augers, tapered reamers, and the like.’
  • 14) ‘The Bayeux Tapestry contains a particularly telling shipbuilding scene in which trees are felled and planks selected, the shipwright checks the lines of the ship by eye and other craftsmen set to work with axes and augers.’
  • 15) ‘The earlier wooden screws for olive and grape presses and the later devices such as augers and letterpresses are all based on the principle of the screw and precede the use of the screwdriver.’
  • 16) ‘We use the auger to drill holes, the sweeper to sweep the parking lot, the hammer to bust concrete.’
  • 17) ‘I carefully drill 16-inch - to 18-inch-deep holes with a 2-inch diameter soil auger.’
  • 18) ‘Samples of clay from the auger holes were tested for moisture content but did not indicate any exceptional level of desiccation.’
  • 19) ‘While he was digging the holes in the sand with a huge auger...’
  • 20) ‘Watching them work, they felt a surge of sympathy for the soldiers who alternated in pairs as they screwed the augers into the semi-frozen earth.’

Examples

  • 1) So what can such a change augur?
  • 2) The data augur well for consumer spending and the economy in general.
  • 3) The ghosts of the past also augur badly.
  • 4) The figures will augur badly for retailers banking on a blockbuster season.
  • 5) The figures augur well for other retailers.
  • 6) Under these circumstances the fairly robust performance of the economy this year could augur badly for the future.
  • 7) In turn, that could augur badly for the strength of consumer demand in the remainder of the year.
  • 8) That does not augur well.
  • 9) It would partly explain why employment has been unexpectedly strong and productivity apparently so weak, and would augur well for future jobs growth.
  • 10) The track record against their pool A rivals does not augur well.
  • 11) It said: 'This does not augur well for winter when demand pressures will mount.
  • 12) It did augur well for the Premier League.
  • 13) He said: 'It does not augur well in building the very foundations of society.
  • 14) ‘He said that both sides' willingness to talk augured well for a peaceful outcome.’
  • 15) ‘Indeed, to have an operation begin with a helicopter crash does not augur well for its outcome.’
  • 16) ‘Those events certainly did not augur well for the success of the project.’
  • 17) ‘Initial feedback from participants was very positive and augurs well for the future of a great event.’
  • 18) ‘The precedent it set does not augur well for future similar elections.’
  • 19) ‘Unfortunately, announcements made in the past few weeks do not augur well for the future.’
  • 20) ‘This is a remarkable and welcome achievement that augurs well for the industry.’
  • 21) ‘This augurs well for our continuing expansion in the future.’
  • 22) ‘This augurs well for dialogue and understanding.’
  • 23) ‘But the fact that there are young men and women in India prepared to dedicate their creative energies to this sort of publishing augurs well.’
  • 24) ‘This also augurs well for the future of education in Radcliffe as a whole.’
  • 25) ‘This is just the second camp organised by this club and a turnout of 120 young children certainly augurs well for its continued success.’
  • 26) ‘This augurs well for the future of its political landscape.’
  • 27) ‘This was a fine performance by the Chamber of Commerce president and certainly augurs well for her future political prospects.’
  • 28) ‘The victory augurs well for the upcoming championship in August.’
  • 29) ‘All augurs well for great racing at Killarney in the years ahead.’
  • 30) ‘This year it was the young players who formed the backbone of the team, which is great to see and augurs well for the future of golf in Swinford.’
  • 31) ‘This talented side have a remarkable success rate this season which augurs well for football in the club over the coming years.’
  • 32) ‘This augurs well for a party seeking to be elected into government.’
  • 33) ‘This augurs well for strengthening domestic demand next year.’
  • 34) ‘The move augurs disaster for pastoralism in the sub-continent, it is a mode of violence against the lives and livelihoods of several thousand rural households.’
  • 35) ‘Perhaps it augurs a return to the epicene male fashion of Genji's time.’
  • 36) ‘Lee does not reckon that much concrete will emerge from the summit but, she adds, ‘I am certain it will augur a new mood in North Korea.’’
  • 37) ‘With that in mind, Franks' presence seems to augur a shift in US policy.’
  • 38) ‘Hope has been replaced by magical thinking that augurs a second and more terrible level of social disruption and anger not far down the road.’
  • 39) ‘I would like to leap to the defence of Quinn, a man as yet untested in football management but exhibiting qualities that augur a bright future.’
  • 40) ‘Not that I have ever felt 100 percent competent in the writing business, where one day's success augurs nothing at all for the next.’
  • 41) ‘Beyond giving vent to frustrations at a relationship gone seriously awry, such rhetoric augurs a troubled future.’
  • 42) ‘That relation of basic inequality augurs less well for the development of peaceful relations even if both parties have democratic governments.’
  • 43) ‘It augurs a far more democratic vision than a culture of achievement that recognizes only talent.’
  • 44) ‘The Violin Concerto starts off, for instance, with dissonant sustained chords auguring a foray into some atonal world of austerity and gray shadings.’
  • 45) ‘Although a crisp breeze had hung in the air when Caleb and his uncle had arrived at Cedar Grove, an azure sky had augured a morning of pleasant weather.’
  • 46) ‘This augured a fundamentally contemptuous attitude toward the principles that had previously sustained US legitimacy.’
  • 47) ‘I tried to recall what it was about his demeanor or statements that augured this rejection, but could not find any clues.’
  • 48) ‘It seemed to augur a new phase in American foreign policy.’
  • 49) ‘It is hoped that this development will augur a new era of cooperation between the AAA and the Academy of Accounting Historians.’
  • 50) ‘The process, itself, was cumbersome and did not augur success.’
  • 51) ‘This could augur another miserable month for the UK's biggest airport.’
  • 52) ‘In contrast to the coalition of 1969, a new coalition would not augur a new period of social reforms.’
  • 53) ‘The quality of the athletes, always impressive, seemed to take a quantum leap forward, a happy augur for the future of the sport in this Eastern European nation.’
  • 54) ‘In the case of the augurs or haruspices of Rome, the animal was sacrificed to permit contemplation of the entrails for prophetic purposes.’
  • 55) ‘People called augurs could also be found in the temples.’
  • 56) ‘Appropriately, with his head veiled he had the omens taken on the Capitoline Hill, accompanied by augurs and priests, and received the requested signs.’
  • 57) ‘An augur in Latin was someone who could see into the future.’
  • 58) ‘The elimination of these Christians, the augur would claim, could restore his divining powers and help the emperor.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy