yuppie

[ US /ˈjəpi/ ]
[ UK /jˈuːpi/ ]
NOUN
  1. a young upwardly mobile professional individual; a well-paid middle-class professional who works in a city and has a luxurious life style
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How To Use yuppie In A Sentence

  • Why don't they mention the yuppies or the businessmen who have a skinful on a Friday night in the wine bar after work?
  • He was disappointed in her choice of restaurant, a noisy, yuppie hang-out, the sort of place where design took precedence over comfort. YELLOW BIRD
  • Her overbearingly entitled yuppie brother, Beau (Craig Wallace), clumsily pitches a tent near Johnnie's with girlfriend-of-the-moment Shavondra (Fatima Quander), a clotheshorse who would flee nature faster than you can say "American Express. '24, 7, 365' review: Perpetual state of angst can be hard to handle
  • Her overbearingly entitled yuppie brother, Beau (Craig Wallace), clumsily pitches a tent near Johnnie's with girlfriend-of-the-moment Shavondra (Fatima Quander), a clotheshorse who would flee nature faster than you can say "American Express. '24, 7, 365' review: Perpetual state of angst can be hard to handle
  • He lived the high life as a London yuppie and threw it all away to work with the poor and destitute in Liverpool slums.
  • Guber, the quintessential New Age yuppie, is seen heading off his divorce because it would cost him too much, and participating in hand-holding group therapy sessions with business partner Peters. Archive 2005-12-01
  • The yuppies in the burbs of Austin, Houston and Dallas don't have anything to worry about, and if they did, they would just sell their house for a profit.
  • Another unforeseen bit of business: yuppies started paying half a million for a condo on the canal, right next to the smoky old factory.
  • Richard Chamberlain: The sound of King Lear pitching Eldorados, Didn't the Yuppie-angst thing die with "thirtysomething"? Pitching With The Stars
  • In case after case, from somnambulism to neurasthenia to ‘Yuppie flu,’ we see how medical and cultural trends alternately reinforce and erode particular psychosomatic symptoms.
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