[ UK /jˈiːld/ ]
[ US /ˈjiɫd/ ]
VERB
  1. give over; surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another
  2. be flexible under stress of physical force
    This material doesn't give
  3. give in, as to influence or pressure
  4. bring in
    How much does this savings certificate pay annually?
    interest-bearing accounts
  5. cease opposition; stop fighting
  6. end resistance, as under pressure or force
    The door yielded to repeated blows with a battering ram
  7. give or supply
    The cow brings in 5 liters of milk
    The estate renders some revenue for the family
    This year's crop yielded 1,000 bushels of corn
  8. move in order to make room for someone for something
    `Move over,' he told the crowd
    The park gave way to a supermarket
  9. be fatally overwhelmed
  10. consent reluctantly
  11. be the cause or source of
    Our meeting afforded much interesting information
    He gave me a lot of trouble
  12. be willing to concede
    I grant you this much
  13. cause to happen or be responsible for
    His two singles gave the team the victory
NOUN
  1. production of a certain amount
  2. the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property
    the average return was about 5%
  3. an amount of a product
  4. the quantity of something (as a commodity) that is created (usually within a given period of time)
    production was up in the second quarter
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How To Use yield In A Sentence

  • Their dried dung is found everywhere, and is in many places the only fuel afforded by the plains; their skulls, which last longer than any other part of the animal, are among the most familiar of objects to the plainsman; their bones are in many districts so plentiful that it has become a regular industry, followed by hundreds of men (christened "bone hunters" by the frontiersmen), to go out with wagons and collect them in great numbers for the sake of the phosphates they yield; and Bad Lands, plateaus, and prairies alike, are cut up in all directions by the deep ruts which were formerly buffalo trails. VIII. The Lordly Buffalo
  • Net interest income dropped to $256.4 million, primarily due to the low market-interest rates that resulted in lower yields on mortgage-related interest-earning assets as customers refinanced to lower mortgage rates and new loans and asset purchases were at the current low market interest rates. Hudson City Bancorp Swings to Loss
  • The danger in Iraq is repeating the biggest mistake - yielding to gradualism.
  • With most of Bradford's other income coming from mortgage broking, estate agency and property surveying, the decent yield really is at the mercy of house prices.
  • Even the normal Perigordine fare of duck la gras and truffles washed down with red wine and pastis has yielded in favour of Scottish food and drink in celebration of the Auld Alliance.
  • Definition: Consumption can be regarded as total expenditure by households on goods and services which yield utility in the current period.
  • ‘This is evident in a number of markets where rents are falling, but yields are not only holding steady, but in most instances hardening,’ he said.
  • The yield of rice will rise to 700 kilograms per mu.
  • This means the circumference is about 1000 meters, so v is 1000 meters per minute, which yields a simulated gravity about 1/6 of Earth's -- the same as the moon (though the people inside move as though the gravity is Earth-normal). 8/1/08: Launch Pad, day 2
  • His dissection of the eye yielded the distinction between cornea, retina, iris, and chorioid coat.
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