William Randolph Hearst

NOUN
  1. United States newspaper publisher whose introduction of large headlines and sensational reporting changed American journalism (1863-1951)
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How To Use William Randolph Hearst In A Sentence

  • William Randolph Hearst was, as the author of this magisterial study rightly says, a major force in American politics and journalism for half a century.
  • But at the time media tycoon William Randolph Hearst was one of the most powerful men in the world, the man on whom Orson Welles based his classic opus Citizen Kane.
  • He feared that the publisher's acquisition plans could result in a consolidation of power the likes of which has not been seen since William Randolph Hearst.
  • More than 100 years ago, unionized newsboys in New York City waged a successful strike against newspaper barons Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst.
  • He was retro with a twist, sticking to a page layout that would seem familiar to a 19th-century newspaper reader; favoring the garish and grotesque in a way that would have gladdened a Joseph Pulitzer or a William Randolph Hearst; and, oddly, doing more to encourage the reading of traditional journalism on the Internet than anyone else. Time For A Slow-Word Movement
  • It was the first movie by Welles, who bucked studio and storytelling conventions to craft a landmark film about the rise and fall of a William Randolph Hearst-like newspaper publisher.
  • It was the first movie by Welles, who bucked studio and storytelling conventions to craft a landmark film about the rise and fall of a William Randolph Hearst-like newspaper publisher.
  • Two newspaper magnates, William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer, turned producing newspapers into a war when they began adding special sections including sports and multiple frame cartoon strips.
  • And what did readers think when they learned that William Randolph Hearst was expelled from Harvard for sending to each of his professors a chamberpot engraved with the teacher's portrait? Intensely Familiar, Yet Strangely Remote
  • It was the first movie by Welles, who bucked studio and storytelling conventions to craft a landmark film about the rise and fall of a William Randolph Hearst-like newspaper publisher.
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