Willard

[ US /ˈwɪɫɝd/ ]
NOUN
  1. United States advocate of temperance and women's suffrage (1839-1898)
  2. United States educator who was an early campaigner for higher education for women (1787-1870)
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How To Use Willard In A Sentence

  • Mann proved himself adept crossing genres from comedies such as Our Man Flint to horror films like Willard.
  • In the scene in the trailer, when he's being briefed by the general, all of them - the general, the CIA agent, the aide-de-camp - look straight at the camera when they talk to Willard.
  • Emma Willard, Concord Academy, Abbott, Brearley, Dana Hall, Garrison, you name it. THE SEASON OF LILLIAN DAWES
  • Willard Van Orman Quine (1908-2000) is one of the most important figures that have profoundly influenced western philosophy and logics in the twentieth century.
  • He looked up at the portrait of the handsome, intense Willard, who was almost certainly turning over in his grave.
  • Willard, having increased a generous inheritance by the profits of very extensive manufacture and export of pearlash and potash: an industry which he and his brother Caleb were the first to introduce into America. The Bay State Monthly — Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1884
  • Mary Regan of Flower Mound, Tex., and Anne Redmiles of Riva, Md.; two stepchildren, Wendy Norwitz of Clarksville and James Norwitz of Willards, Md.; 21 grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter. Charles J. Puglisi, 77, Md. computer salesman, dies
  • The prize in 1960 was given to Willard F. Libby of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), for his method to determine the age of various objects (of geological or archeological origin) by measurements of the radioactive isotope carbon-14. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry: The Development of Modern Chemistry
  • “Compositionally perfect, his work never loses sight of the more important human thing back of the steel and concrete,” effused the pioneering photographer and filmmaker Willard Van Dyke in a 1935 critique. Colossus
  • But it's a long journey, and before he confronts the renegade colonel, Willard must first face all manner of trippy imagery, including the American Air Cavalry strafing a Vietnamese village to the sound of amplified Wagner, Robert Duvall declaring that he loves "the smell of napalm in the morning", a riot triggered by frugging bunny-girls, a Californian surfer on LSD and Dennis Hopper as a madly babbling photojournalist. Apocalypse Now: No 1
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