[ UK /wˈɔːsən/ ]
NOUN
  1. insulting terms of address for people who are stupid or irritating or ridiculous
  2. the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parents
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How To Use whoreson In A Sentence

  • I saw Pinch gaping even as he hammered on the drum, and I went and danced before him, staring until he lowered his eyes, while I sang, Whoreson, whoreson, whoreson! and fizzed with laughter. Wildfire
  • Richard, a whoreson crookback, misbegotten, makes love to a widowed Ann Ulysses
  • A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so troubles me, and the foolish fortune of this girl; and what one thing, what another, that I shall leave you one o’ these days: and I have a rheum in mine eyes too, and such an ache in my bones that, unless a man were cursed, I cannot tell what to think on’t. Act V. Scene III. Troilus and Cressida
  • A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so troubles me, and the foolish fortune of this girl; and what one thing, what another, that I shall leave you one o 'these days: and I have a rheum in mine eyes too, and such an ache in my bones that, unless a man were cursed, I cannot tell what to think on't. Troilus and Cressida
  • The whoreson's life is mine to claim and I will use any method at my disposal to be rid of him.
  • “Are you just going to leave me here to rot or are you going to give me a chance to help you bring down that miserable whoreson who calls himself my uncle?” The Devil Wears Plaid
  • No resident burgess is in anger to call a bailiff or wardemen by any name such as thief, knave, backbiter, whoreson, false, foresworn, cuckold, or bawd.
  • Why, sir, his hide is so tanned with his trade that he will keep out water a great while, and your water is a sore decayer of your whoreson dead body. Act V. Scene I. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
  • Why, sir, his hide is so tann’d with his trade that he will keep out water a great while, and your water is a sore decayer of your whoreson dead body. Act V. Scene I
  • The Earl of Kent in King Lear insults Oswald: ‘Thou whoreson zed, thou unnecessary letter!’
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