white cedar

NOUN
  1. small evergreen of eastern North America having tiny scalelike leaves on flattened branchlets
  2. slow-growing medium-sized cedar of east coast of the United States; resembles American arborvitae
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How To Use white cedar In A Sentence

  • The crossdating of white cedar and jack pine snags was accomplished using previously developed chronologies from the same area.
  • The forests include such conifers as red spruce, black spruce, white spruce, balsam fir, red pine, jack pine, eastern white pine, tamarack, eastern white cedar, and eastern hemlock.
  • Cedar and white ash, rock-cedar and sand plants and tamarisk red cedar and white cedar and black cedar from the inmost forest, fragrance upon fragrance and all of my sea-magic is for nought. Hymen
  • Most of the existing wetlands are freshwater, coniferous scrub/shrub wetlands, with small palustrine forested wetland complexes as well as Atlantic White Cedar wetland complexes. 2009 March « Beachwood Historical Alliance
  • Her skirt was woven of red and white cedar bark, she had carved silver bracelets and copper bracelets set with haliotis shell, and earrings of sharks 'teeth. Many Swans: Sun Myth of the North American Indians
  • Large masses of Java teak and Yellow wood have also been found, besides immense trees of red and white cedar, and the blue gumwood of New Holland, in a perfectly sound condition. Chapter XX
  • In the forest were black gum trees and thick stands of white cedar.
  • The house is protected by a tree lined driveway which features Himalayan cedars, Chinese elms, white cedars, peppercorns, kurrajongs, jacarandas, bunyah trees and an abundance of olives.
  • On the small flats, the apple-gum grew with a few scattered Moreton Bay ash trees; on the bergues of the river we found the white cedar (Melia azedarach), Clerodendron; an asclepiadaceous shrub with large triangular seed-vessels; and, on the hills, the blood-wood and stringy-bark. Journal of an Overland Expedition in Australia : from Moreton Bay to Port Essington, a distance of upwards of 3000 miles, during the years 1844-1845
  • In the case of white cedar, more than 50% of the seedlings originated from vegetative layering.
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