[ US /ˈjuʒəwəɫ, ˈjuʒuəɫ/ ]
[ UK /jˈuːʒuːə‍l/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure
    the usual summer heat
    the child's usual bedtime
    came at the usual time
    grew the usual vegetables
  2. commonly encountered
    a common (or familiar) complaint
    the usual greeting
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How To Use usual In A Sentence

  • The buildings are usually gabled, with rows of tiles along the ridges of the roofs.
  • It would not be so bad if these tests were actually based on science or some objective measure but they are usually exercises in bureaucratic futility. Barack Obama Elected President of the United States | One Year Later...What's Changed?
  • With the usual prerogative of the wealthy classes, he tended to choose doctors with a reputation for having studied some topics in greater detail than usual.
  • If we have spent several class periods introducing conventions of reasoned evidence in argumentative writing, we usually look for such features in student papers.
  • He specialized in moonlit and winter scenes, usually including a sheet of water and sometimes also involving the light of a fire, and he also painted sunsets and views at dawn or twilight.
  • It might as well be closed, because in many American hospitals you're simply shooed from the windowsill after you've been nursed back to health (usually in 72 hours or less), and you're expected to "fly" on your own. Mark Lachs, M.D.: Care Transitions: The Hazards of Going In and Coming Out of the Hospital
  • It continues as an usual inland resort set in woodland of silver birches, rhododendrons and conifers.
  • Labor economics has become virtually a branch of applied econometrics, with the usual large data sets and headless horsemen running around looking for patterns.
  • Such football titbits always float to the surface on third-round day which remains the best, most hectic, interesting and fun day of the season - and this one was even more frenetic than usual.
  • So, the system of existential graphs actually requires three dimensions for its representations, although the third dimension in which the torus is embedded can usually be represented in two dimensions by the use of pictorial devices that Peirce called “fornices” or “tunnel-bridges” and by the use of identificational devices that Peirce called Nobody Knows Nothing
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