[ US /ˈtɪpəkəɫ, ˈtɪpɪkəɫ/ ]
[ UK /tˈɪpɪkə‍l/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. conforming to a type
    the typical (or normal) American
    typical teenage behavior
  2. exhibiting the qualities or characteristics that identify a group or kind or category
    a typical case of arteritis
    a typical romantic poem
    a typical American girl
    a typical suburban community
    the typical car owner drives 10,000 miles a year
    a painting typical of the Impressionist school
  3. of a feature that helps to distinguish a person or thing
    that is typical of you!
    Jerusalem has a distinctive Middle East flavor
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How To Use typical In A Sentence

  • My generation was raised on a diet of stultifyingly tedious, but worthy accounts of embryology, typically very badly printed on what appeared to be rice paper.
  • The prototypical noun may be (though need not be) quite long, stress will fall early in the word, the stressed vowel will be non-front, and the final consonant (if an obstruent) will be voiceless.
  • The mysterious jack snipe is a typical bird of the often water-logged northern taiga, birch and willow country.
  • It was a typical gesture of love and togetherness. The Sun
  • For high-definition video, the umi needs an Internet connection that can send, or upload, data at 1.5 megabits per second, higher than that of typical DSL or cable services. Cisco Launches 'Umi' Telepresence Box To Turn TVs Into Videophones
  • The composition of displaced terranes ranges from that of typical oceanic crust to significantly less dense granitic rock with clear continental affinities.
  • Mao was your typical twentieth century despot, and only moon-eyed Communists would beg to differ. Chairman Mao in a Dress Not Funny?
  • Hence, the aim of the analysis of attitudes was to reveal the hidden patterns typically sedimented in particular social and cultural contexts.
  • The threatened uniform typically consists of a khaki military tunic with trousers, though in Scottish regiments the trousers are usually tartan or replaced by a kilt.
  • The typical Ruby-crowned Kinglet nest is deep and is suspended from two hanging twigs.
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