[ UK /tɹˈʌmpəɹi/ ]
NOUN
  1. nonsensical talk or writing
  2. ornamental objects of no great value
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How To Use trumpery In A Sentence

  • Ah, poor fellow! nothing can be more melancholy; unless, as young men sometimes do, you had fancied yourself in love with some trumpery specimen of womankind, which is indeed, as Shakspeare truly says, pressing to death, whipping, and hanging all at once. The Antiquary — Complete
  • All along the extent of the corridor, in little alcoves, there are stalls of shops, kept principally by women, who, as you approach, are seen through the dusk offering for sale… multifarious trumpery.
  • An assertion of absolute moral superiority in the form of black-shirted nuclear families - spiritual trumpery via breeding.
  • Louis XI, an habitual derider of whatever did not promise real power or substantial advantage, was in especial a professed contemner of heralds and heraldry, “red, blue, and green, with all their trumpery,” to which the pride of his rival Charles, which was of a very different kind, attached no small degree of ceremonious importance. Quentin Durward
  • And yet no sooner did I embrace the part, padding about in my jubbah and Ali Baba slippers, sipping mint tea, jingling my jewelry and letting my belly grow, than she accused me of being a crass vulgarian, an Oriental souk Jew with the taste for trumpery of a market trader from Waltham-stow. Kalooki Nights
  • Airbrushing, "interpolations," positing non-existent weather stations, creative "algorithms," frauds and flim flams in general - such is "science" in the age of ideological trumpery and triumphalism. On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...
  • Doubtles the author of this libell was some vagabond huckster or pedler, and had gone particularly into many corners of Island to vtter his trumpery wares, which he also testifieth of himselfe in his worthy rimes, that he had trauailed thorow the greatest part of A briefe commentarie of Island, by Arngrimus Ionas
  • ` ` Ah, poor fellow! nothing can be more melancholy; unless, as young men sometimes do, you had fancied yourself in love with some trumpery specimen of womankind, which is indeed, as Shakspeare truly says, pressing to death, whipping, and hanging all at once. '' The Antiquary
  • Descriptions of the artist in his painting room ‘up to his ears in the trumpery he had been collecting for many a year’ include these panels, which he hoped ‘to use… in some way that may add to their value.’
  • “You may give quarters to such cattle if you like it yourself, Harry Wynd; but the same house shall not quarter that trumpery quean and me, and of that you may assure yourself.” The Fair Maid of Perth
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