sideline

[ UK /sˈa‍ɪdla‍ɪn/ ]
[ US /ˈsaɪdˌɫaɪn/ ]
VERB
  1. remove from the center of activity or attention; place into an inferior position
    The outspoken cabinet member was sidelined by the President
NOUN
  1. an auxiliary activity
  2. a line that marks the side boundary of a playing field
  3. an auxiliary line of merchandise
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How To Use sideline In A Sentence

  • It was followed by Crime, where plot and suspense were king, and those often sidelined as "genre fiction" — Crichton, King or Rendell — were given credit for their craft.
  • But red tape is still keeping him sidelined. The Sun
  • But red tape is still keeping him sidelined. The Sun
  • On the ‘digital’ battlefield there is a real likelihood that brigade commanders will talk directly to sergeants or corporals commanding sections and that intermediate officers will be sidelined.
  • It did not help that both players took to Twitter to snipe from the sidelines. Times, Sunday Times
  • For the second time in as many months the Sligo Rovers boss was sent from the sideline for remonstrating with a match official.
  • One time, not too long ago, I saw a line of lame dancers unable to participate in class, sitting on the sidelines, questioning when they would return to dance.
  • CACI is a fast-growing billion dollar information technology firm with an intriguing sideline in intelligence.
  • But it's no longer permissible to sit on the sidelines making snide comments.
  • As they grunted and jabbed, Mr. McCain chatted with a few players and their coaches, shook a few hands and then headed to the sidelines. McCain Huddles With Marshall Team - The Caucus Blog - NYTimes.com
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