shorn

[ UK /ʃˈɔːn/ ]
[ US /ˈʃɔɹn/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. having the hair or wool cut or clipped off as if with shears or clippers
    picked up the baby's shorn curls from the floor
    naked as a sheared sheep
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How To Use shorn In A Sentence

  • She looks terrible, shorn of all her beauty and dignity.
  • We see these victims everywhere shorn of power -- weak, nerveless, backboneless, staminaless, gritless people, without forcefulness, mere nonentities because they have ceased working. Pushing to the Front
  • It can't: it is crammed with lovers packed in tight, the details smashed flat, extraneous facts shorn away to save space, mangled and compressed to the point of incomprehensibility and all beyond counting or collating.
  • At another time it might have been a pretty journey, the hills just turning the colors of pumpkin and hay and pomegranate and the skies depthless and clear, but now everywhere one looked most of the trees had been felled for fuel and there was only a hazy, oppressive brightness refracted from the shorn hillsides. Excerpt: The Surrendered by Chang-rae Lee
  • Norwegian royalty is shorn of regalia but is safety ensconced in respect.
  • Wolf ended her life in her beloved Berlin, doubly exiled in her own country and shorn of her faith, left only with Was bleibt – what remains, the title of the account of being under surveillance by the Stasi that she wrote in 1979, and that aroused considerable controversy when published in 1990. Christa Wolf obituary
  • “But we were thrown before its beauty unprepared, unshrived, unshorn.” Angkor Wat Book Review - A Glimpse of a Bygone Era | Angkor Wat Apsara & Devata: Khmer Women in Divine Context
  • If the curtain is dirtier , usable dishcloth dips in the scour that leave cleans some of Wen Shuirong, hartshorn of usable also a few is brushed.
  • Unlike other luxurious wools such as cashmere and pashmina, shahtoosh is produced from the fine, inner hairs of the Tibetan antelope - which cannot be shorn from the animal.
  • -- I have often, I said, fancied that, besides the load of exuvial coats and breeches under which he staggers, there is another weight on him -- an atrior cura at his tail -- and while his unshorn lips and nose together are performing that mocking, boisterous, Jack-indifferent cry of "Clo ', clo'!" who knows what woeful utterances are crying from the heart within? Catherine: a Story
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