shittah

NOUN
  1. source of a wood mentioned frequently in the Bible; probably a species of genus Acacia
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How To Use shittah In A Sentence

  • The acacia, which, in Scripture, is always called 'shittah' and in the plural 'shittim,' was esteemed a sacred wood among the Hebrews. The Symbolism of Freemasonry
  • (Heb. shittah, the thorny), is without doubt correctly referred to some species of Acacia, of which three or four kinds occur in the Bible lands. Smith's Bible Dictionary
  • I will plant in the wilderness the cedar, the shittah tree, and the myrtle, and the oil tree; I will set in the desert the fir tree, and the pine, and the box tree together: Villaraigosa And Nunez Cut And Run - Video Report
  • It is the mimosa nilotica of Linnæus, the shittah of the Hebrew writers, and grows abundantly in Palestine. The Symbolism of Freemasonry
  • Antipas, its polished marble gleaming through the tops of palms and the lace-like green of shittah trees. The Coming of the King
  • Then they ran into a meteoroid swarm (she supposed) which rebounded off their shieldfields and sent them careening off trajectory; and the man shook his fist, commenced on a mighty oath, glimpsed her and turned it into a Biblical “Damask rose and shittah tree!” The Earth Book of Stormgate
  • The Hebrew shíttah is probably a contraction of Shinttah, and thus identical with the Egyptian shent; the Coptic shonte, thorn; the The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize
  • (Heb. shittim) Ex. 25: 5, R.V. probably the Acacia seyal (the gum-arabic tree); called the "shittah" tree (Isa. Easton's Bible Dictionary
  • All the same, Deker knew he would never be able to erase from his mind that first horrific glimpse of twenty-four thousand blackened corpses strung out among a golden sea of shittah trees. THE PROMISED WAR
  • It is thought that the shittah and shittim wood of the Bible, of which Moses made the greater part of the tables, altars and planks of the tabernacle, was the same as the black acacia found in the deserts of Arabia and about Mount Sinai and the mountains which border on the Red Sea, and is so hard and solid as to be almost incorruptible. Among the Trees at Elmridge
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