shinney

NOUN
  1. a simple version of hockey played by children on the streets (or on ice or on a field) using a ball or can as the puck
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How To Use shinney In A Sentence

  • The name "bandy" is sometimes applied also to shinney or shinty and in Outdoor Sports and Games
  • When we had nothing else to do in the way of enjoyment we played the game of "shinney" - a game that gave great pleasure to us all. The new man : twenty-nine years a slave, twenty-nine years a free man,
  • The name "bandy" is sometimes applied also to shinney or shinty and in Outdoor Sports and Games
  • Every one resident in the midland counties must be acquainted with the word _nog_, applied to the wooden ball used in the game of "shinney," the corresponding term of which, _nacket_, holds in parts of Scotland, where also a short, corpulent person is called a _nuget_. Notes and Queries, Number 180, April 9, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc
  • Hockey is usually played on the ice by players on skates, although, like the old game of shinney, it may be played on any level piece of ground. Outdoor Sports and Games
  • It would no doubt surprise the reader, and no less so our Honorable Secretary of the Navy, should I say that I have seen George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, Rip Van Winkle, Allen G. Thurman and Hillary Herbert engaged together in a game of shinney. Naming the Indians
  • shinney-sticks" where their owners had put them for safe-keeping -- he knew all the "hidie-holes," though it was years and years since he had played "shinney" here. The Second Chance
  • In the woodpile he noticed "shinny-sticks" where their owners had put them for safe-keeping – he knew all the "hidie-holes," though it was years and years since he had played "shinney" here. The Second Chance
  • Horace was not strong enough to play baseball, and his mamma had forbidden him to play shinney, so he always stayed with the girls at recess, which was often very inconvenient when Elizabeth and Rosie wanted to teeter by themselves or stay indoors and tell secrets. 'Lizbeth of the Dale
  • The name "bandy" is sometimes applied also to shinney or shinty and in Outdoor Sports and Games
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