sequent

[ US /ˈsikwənt/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. in regular succession without gaps
    serial concerts
  2. occurring with or following as a consequence
    the resultant savings were considerable
    snags incidental to the changeover in management
    collateral target damage from a bombing run
    an excessive growth of bureaucracy, with attendant problems
    attendant circumstances
    the period of tension and consequent need for military preparedness
    the ensuant response to his appeal
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How To Use sequent In A Sentence

  • The fall in popularity of the death's head and the subsequent prevalence of the cherub was a reflection of the Great Awakening and the belief in the immortality of the soul: "Cherubs reflect a stress on resurrection, while death's heads emphasize the mortality of man. Headstones for Dummies, the New York Edition
  • Consequently many penalties are cleared just before the finish. Times, Sunday Times
  • I was telling him about last night and he described me as sounding languid and louche, and consequently correctly guessed that I was still in bed.
  • Animals are humanized, that is, the kinship between animal and human life is still keenly felt, and this reminds us of those early animistic interpretations of nature which subsequently led to doctrines of metempsychosis. The Art of the Story-Teller
  • These works have subsequently become the most widely performed and appreciated in the Boyce repertoire.
  • Both these pursuits found their way into his writing, as well as motivating his subsequent relocation to Berlin.
  • Consequently, we lag all the other industrialized countries in buildout investment, even France!! — Comcast Appeals F.C.C. Sanction - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
  • My poor Lirriper was a handsome figure of a man, with a beaming eye and a voice as mellow as a musical instrument made of honey and steel, but he had ever been a free liver being in the commercial travelling line and travelling what he called a limekiln road — “a dry road, Emma my dear,” my poor Lirriper says to me, “where I have to lay the dust with one drink or another all day long and half the night, and it wears me Emma” — and this led to his running through a good deal and might have run through the turnpike too when that dreadful horse that never would stand still for a single instant set off, but for its being night and the gate shut and consequently took his wheel, my poor Lirriper and the gig smashed to atoms and never spoke afterwards. Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgings
  • Here is a supreme example of sequential planning.
  • Added to which there is a large increase in the fees receivable in 1994 to a level of almost £123,000 which accounts for the large increase in the gross profit over the previous and subsequent years.
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