sene

NOUN
  1. 100 sene equal 1 tala in Western Samoa
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How To Use sene In A Sentence

  • Thereafter thought, weighing the truth or falseness of the notion, determines what is true: and this explains the Greek word for thought, dianoia, which is derived from dianoein, meaning to think and discriminate. NPNF2-09. Hilary of Poitiers, John of Damascus
  • To avoid having sodium react with oxygen or water vapor in the air, it is usually stored under kerosene, naphtha, or some other organic liquid with which it does not react.
  • What I really liked, from my white boy point-of-view, was Eddie taking a brief second to explain his continual usage of the N-word: because its power is lessened the more it's used.
  • This is Europe's problem too," went the refrain, after more than 1,400 immigrant had arrived in Tenerife and Gran Canaria in the previous week, making 2,000 landing in the month, mostly from Senegal and Mali. The pace quickens
  • We have devised a functional approach to clone genes involved in the regulation of cell growth and senescence.
  • For the fondness or averseness of the child to some servants, will at any time let one know, whether their love to the baby is uniform and the same, when one is absent, as present. Pamela
  • No wonder, as Mr. Hamilton drily notes, that on the wall of the Leipzig Gewandhaus (where Mendelssohn played and conducted) was Seneca's apothegm: "Res severa est verum gaudium. What Music Has Lost
  • Although he had not howled once, his snarling and growling, combined with his thirst, had hoarsened his throat and dried the mucous membranes of his mouth so that he was incapable, except under the sheerest provocation, of further sound. CHAPTER XVI
  • Many of the major characters are historical figures, notably Llewellyn and David, their mother Lady Senena and their two other brothers Owen Goch “Owen the Red” and Rhodri, and King Henry III of England. Sunrise in the West, by Edith Pargeter. Book review
  • The looseness of the journalistic life, the seeming laxity of the newsroom, is an illusion.
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