self-denying

ADJECTIVE
  1. willing to deprive yourself
  2. used especially of behavior
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How To Use self-denying In A Sentence

  • Co. Professor Fisher, in allowing the subject of this biography to tell the story of his life, restricts himself very self-denyingly to here and there a line of introduction or comment. The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 105, July 1866
  • The two figures, one highly individualised, dedicated to self-assertion and pleasure-seeking, the other ascetic and self-denying, are sharply contrasted.
  • Touching ecclesiastical officers, the apostle's evident scope is to urge them not to be proud of their spiritual gifts, (which in those days abounded,) but to think soberly, self-denyingly of themselves, and to use all their gifts well. The Divine Right of Church Government by Sundry Ministers Of Christ Within The City Of London
  • Again the overall approach is Spartan in its self-denying austerity and yet has a wholly characteristic eagle-eyed intensity.
  • Being a poor man, filling a place fit only for rich men, he had been driven to think of money, and had become self-denying and parsimonious - perhaps we may say hungry and close-fisted.
  • Sargent is portrayed as modest, self-denying and unambitious, the antithesis of the preening Oxford peacocks.
  • Though trained as a chemist, he is considered an excellent theologian, and he is legendary for his simple and self-denying way of life: he lives in unadorned rooms near the cathedral in Buenos Aires and takes the bus to his appointments. The Year of two Popes
  • The two figures, one highly individualised, dedicated to self-assertion and pleasure-seeking, the other ascetic and self-denying, are sharply contrasted.
  • Oh! if they would faithfully, humbly, and self-denyingly lay out themselves for Christ and his Church, and never think of titles and reputation, they should then have honor whether they would or not; but by gaping after it, they lose it: for, this is the case of virtue's shadow, ` What follows I fly; what flies, the same I follow. ' The Reformed Pastor
  • Absolutely all, with Allegre self-denyingly on her right hand, with that impenetrable air of guardianship. The Arrow of Gold
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