self-conscious

[ US /ˌsɛɫfˈkɑnʃəs/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. excessively and uncomfortably conscious of your appearance or behavior
    wondered if she could ever be untidy without feeling self-conscious about it
    self-conscious teenagers
  2. aware of yourself as an individual or of your own being and actions and thoughts
    self-conscious awareness
    self-conscious about their roles as guardians of the social values
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How To Use self-conscious In A Sentence

  • Nilufer Bharucha, faculty in the department of English and project coordinator, explained that the term diaspora means to be scattered or dispersed across national boundaries, and has been self-consciously used today by postcolonial theorists to describe those who got displaced from their home owing to colonial politics and post-colonial economic realities. Analysis
  • These prose pieces ultimately acquire a kind of poetic intensity of effect in their bleak circumscription of the character's experience, although they avoid self-consciously "poetic" devices: Narrative Strategies
  • But gack, it's just so clumsy here, and so very, very self-conscious.
  • Critics and fellow writers admired them, but grew increasingly weary with the deranged self-consciousness of it all. Times, Sunday Times
  • DreamWorks, in particular, has made the kind of allusive, parodic cultural self-consciousness that used to be called postmodernism safe for the whole family. NYT > Home Page
  • It is a role she embraces with regal dignity and a hint of self-conscious reluctance.
  • Or it may be the removal of any self-consciousness that can often accompany public expression of Jewishness in the diaspora.
  • It was the first time I left the house without my hooter hider and for once I stopped being so goddamned self-conscious about doing something NATURAL! Bare Your Boobs In The Air! Like You Just Don’t Care! | Her Bad Mother
  • Finally, to make the whole matter clear, let me repeat that this event, the inbreak of Self-consciousness, took place, or BEGAN to take place, an enormous time ago, perhaps in the beginning of the Neolithic Age. Pagan and Christian creeds: their origin and meaning
  • It showed me a way of arguing, quite different from the hot-faced, angry exchanges with family members or the awkward, self-conscious exchanges with school friends.
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