sedition

[ US /sɪˈdɪʃən/ ]
[ UK /sɛdˈɪʃən/ ]
NOUN
  1. an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government
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How To Use sedition In A Sentence

  • It comes closeto ‘sedition’ as defined in the early days of US governmentinthe Adams Administration sponsored "Alien and Sedition Act" wherein it became a type of treason to hinder the legitimate workings of government for the purposes of political gain. The Way Things Aren't: The GOP Opts out of Reality Unleashing More Demagoguery
  • The Federalists passed the Sedition Act and John Adams used it to imprison newspaper columnists who wrote articles critical of his administration.
  • The Army has charged him with five offenses: sedition, aiding the enemy, spying, espionage and failure to obey a general order.
  • Military officials initially told the press that he might face charges of espionage and sedition, even treason.
  • Park then placed him under house arrest, while his captors went free, and later imprisoned him for sedition.
  • But while it may not breach broadcasting regulations, it may breach the law against sedition, as it incites disaffection against the crown.
  • The false accusations we heard in the news media last week incite sectarian sedition.
  • John offers a constant and persistent whine that borders on sedition.
  • Can an author with reason complain that he is cramped and shackled if he is not at liberty to publish blasphemy, bawdry, or sedition?
  • Trade Union leaders were charged with sedition.
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