[ UK /skˈuːp/ ]
[ US /ˈskup/ ]
VERB
  1. get the better of
    the goal was to best the competition
  2. take out or up with or as if with a scoop
    scoop the sugar out of the container
NOUN
  1. the shovel or bucket of a dredge or backhoe
  2. the quantity a scoop will hold
  3. a news report that is reported first by one news organization
    he got a scoop on the bribery of city officials
  4. street names for gamma hydroxybutyrate
  5. a large ladle
    he used a scoop to serve the ice cream
  6. a hollow concave shape made by removing something
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use scoop In A Sentence

  • Recruit rich white republicunts (carpetbaggers) to swoop in and scoop-up "devalued" (seized from still-exiled owners) properties and change the entire complexion (race, income, politics, everyfuckingthing) of the ENTIRE GREATER NEW ORLEANS AREA. Your Right Hand Thief
  • One scoop of ice cream holds seven teaspoons of sugar.
  • You run around the garden scooping air into the open end and then you tie a knot. Times, Sunday Times
  • They acted like some surreptitious athletics officials who could not wait to be the first to give the media a scoop and doubtless court future favour as a reward.
  • Our tale is about a journalist who decides to go to the Soviet Union to get a big scoop for the front page of his newspaper.
  • To get this scoop, Naxos brought its recording equipment to the Wexford Festival Opera on the coast of Ireland.
  • A bowl accompanied by a plate of three perogies, a scoop of mashed potatoes and a gob of the ubiquitous sour cream makes a filling, comforting and extremely thrifty supper.
  • The singer evinced one bad habit in the Mahler group, a tendency to scoop into opening phrases.
  • He still scooped a gong but this is for real. The Sun
  • You mean to say someone scooped this from off the floor of the labs and said, yes, this blue one here, let's see what sort of monstrosity it will blossom into if brought to term?
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy