scepticism

[ UK /skˈɛptɪsˌɪzəm/ ]
NOUN
  1. the disbelief in any claims of ultimate knowledge
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How To Use scepticism In A Sentence

  • Scepticism failed to save her from scenting danger in the ardent courtship of a rich young Philadelphian.
  • Britain has an age-old tradition of Euro scepticism that goes back to well before the Second World War.
  • It is not the reality of scepticism or of truth dissolving relativism, but the claim to truth of all formal argument that is affected.
  • Nothing short of substantive and meaningful improvement in the material well being of ordinary South Africans will overturn this tide of distrust and scepticism.
  • For many on the right in the UK, Atlanticism has become synonymous with a self-defeating, virulent Euroscepticism that is bad for Britain. Labour: UK should integrate key defence decisions with Europe
  • Today such sentiments tend to be treated with scepticism, if not depicted as elitist.
  • A similar test involving email yielded the same result, although the researchers' limited pool of testees - 63 for the phone and 50 for the email - coupled to the fact that only nine subjects were filmed across the two tests, prompted "some scepticism". Thoughts are things (thoughts have wings).
  • It is a spiritual ingredient, composed, when one comes to analyse it, of two chemical elements; of what might be called aesthetic egoism and of what we know as philosophic scepticism. Suspended Judgments Essays on Books and Sensations
  • There may be some sound reasons for the scepticism about green initiatives. Times, Sunday Times
  • I was so hurt by her coldness and scepticism that tears rose to my eyes.
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