saltwort

NOUN
  1. low-growing strong-smelling coastal shrub of warm parts of the New World having unisexual flowers in conelike spikes and thick succulent leaves
  2. bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to produce a crude soda ash
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How To Use saltwort In A Sentence

  • From a burrow hidden beneath a flourish of saltwort, a land iguana watched them pass, not even bothering to lift its head. MINUTES TO BURN
  • Large areas on the alluvial saline plains are characterized by halophytic plant communities including Artemisia pauciflora, A. schrenkiana, A. nitrosa and perennial saltwort (Atriplex cana, Anabasis salsa, and Camphorosma monspeliaca). Kazakh semi-desert
  • _Barilla_, a rich potassic manure prepared by burning certain strand plants, especially the saltwort, was also in the past largely exported from Sicily and Spain. Manures and the principles of manuring
  • Above the Spartina-dominated community are found several succulents, including pickleweed and saltwort. Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve, California
  • an odd-looking word which comes more or less straight from the Arabic al-kali, meaning the calcined ashes of plants such as saltwort.
  • Glasswort, saltwort, salt grasses and oxeye are other salt-tolerant plants that exist in and around the marsh. Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve, Georgia
  • It appeared that the saltwort plants, which were numerous, were not only efficacious in keeping the cattle that fed on them in the best possible condition; but as wholly preventing cattle and sheep from licking clay, a vicious habit to which they are so prone, that grassy runs in the higher country nearer Sydney are sometimes abandoned only on account of the Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia
  • Other common salt marsh plants include black rush, saltwort, marsh lavender and marsh elder. Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Rhode Island
  • It appeared that the saltwort plants, which were numerous, were not only efficacious in keeping the cattle that fed on them in the best possible condition; but as wholly preventing cattle and sheep from licking clay, a vicious habit to which they are so prone, that grassy runs in the higher country nearer Sydney are sometimes abandoned only on account of the “licking holes” they contain. Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia
  • Common Indian saltwort (Suaeda maritima) occurs in saline soils along the eastern and western coasts of India. Chapter 7
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