salt mine

NOUN
  1. a mine where salt is dug
  2. a job involving drudgery and confinement
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How To Use salt mine In A Sentence

  • By this point, a hush had fallen over the standing-room only bus crowd, mostly composed of giggling school kids and sullen working poor on their way to the salt mines.
  • ‘I have a question for you’, begged a student in information technology who guided us round the old underground salt mines outside the city.
  • The nomads bring their animals here to the town of InGall in Niger to feed on grass which is rich in salt minerals, believing that the practice fortifies the animals.
  • The chase would have then continued across a salt mine with the two mortal enemies scrambling over the pure white hills of salt before Blofeld would fall to his death in a salt granulator. The Best Worst Bond Movie
  • The salt mine is one of more than 500 fleets using biodiesel fuel.
  • Ejidatarios juntos con la Otra Campaña zapatista, cierran la mina de sal más grande del mundo Farmers, Ranchers, and the Zapatista Other Campaign Shut Down the Largest Salt Mine on Earth The Narco News Bulletin
  • Plans are also afoot to transform the disused salt mines of Saxony and Thuringia into depositories for toxic waste.
  • Kordofan, whither it is imported from Darfour; and salt, from the salt mines of Boyedha; but this salt is dear, and the poor use as a substitute for it a brine, which they procure by dissolving in hot water lumps of a reddish coloured saline earth, of a bitterish, disagreeable taste, which they purchase from the Bedouins of the eastern desert; it seems to contain ochre and allum. Travels in Nubia
  • Rock salt is what the salt mined from underground is called, whether it is literally mined in solid form (a practice now rare) or pumped up to the surface and then evaporated, to be crystallized to the desired degree of fineness.
  • To him, a sunrise signals another day in the salt mines. Christianity Today
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