[ UK /sˈe‍ɪntli/ ]
[ US /ˈseɪntɫi/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. marked by utter benignity; resembling or befitting an angel or saint
    angelic beneficence
    my sainted mother
    a saintly concern for his fellow men
    a beatific smile
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How To Use saintly In A Sentence

  • None of this success has made me a more saintly or holy person. Christianity Today
  • Lively, pretty, and pleasure-loving, Carie had married the saintly younger brother of the minister in her hometown of Hillsboro, West Virginia, because he was preparing to go as a missionary to China, and she wanted to give herself to God. PEARL BUCK IN CHINA
  • In contrast, Princess Sirindhorn, his sister, enjoys a saintly image as a patron of charity.
  • This, which has been called the ostracism of a saintly genius, undoubtedly was due to his former friends, Ward and Manning. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman
  • According to the book, the familiar image of a saintly, eccentric genius was carefully cultivated.
  • In old Mauritania, now Marocco,384 the Moors proper are notable sodomites; Moslems, even of saintly houses, are permitted openly to keep catamites, nor do their disciples think worse of their sanctity for such licence: in one case the English wife failed to banish from the home “that horrid boy.” The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night
  • Her religion is an obscure chaos of theogonies as old as the world, treasured up out of respect for ancient customs; and of more recent ideas about the blessed final annihilation, imported from India by saintly Chinese missionaries at the epoch of our The French Immortals Series — Complete
  • His film includes a wonderful scene where Sister Bridget cries when watching The Bells Of Saint Mary's, obviously sees herself in the saintly Ingrid Bergman role.
  • Some, notably the antinomians, were theologically unorthodox; their obsession with personal “conversion” led them to question whether the “visible saints” governing the colony were truly saintly.
  • But there were many cloistered Christians who studied the bible undisturbed by these shadows and doubts, and who, heedless of patristical lore and saintly wisdom, devoured the spiritual food in its pure and uncontaminating simplicity -- such students, humble, patient, devoted, will be found crowding the monastic annals, and yielding good evidence of the same by the holy tenor of their sinless lives, their Christian charity and love. Bibliomania in the Middle Ages
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