[ US /ɹiˈspɛktɪv, ɹɪˈspɛktɪv/ ]
[ UK /ɹɪspˈɛktɪv/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. considered individually
    specialists in their several fields
    the respective club members
    the various reports all agreed
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How To Use respective In A Sentence

  • New members are always welcome, irrespective of what stage of bereavement they are at.
  • He and Barton were now called upon for their names, and in return, we were favoured with the liquid and vowelly appellatives, by which our ingenuous and communicative acquaintances were respectively designated. The Island Home
  • These positions are frequently referred to respectively as objectivism and constructionism.
  • The best adequacy for EA was obtained by combinations of imipenem/cilastatin or piperacillin/tazobactam, amikacin and a glycopeptide, with values reaching 99% and 94%, respectively. BioMed Central - Latest articles
  • As it was evident he was in no mood for converse, Sybil, who seemed to exercise considerable authority over the crew, with a word dispersed them, and they herded back to their respective habitations. Rookwood
  • The blue and red boxes indicate the amino acid changes associated with the andromonoecious phenotype in melon and cucumber, respectively. PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles
  • One of the stars of the collection is the Diana and Minerva commode of 1773, so called for the inlaid roundels representing the goddesses of the hunt and the arts, respectively.
  • In neopaganism, the spring and autumn equinoxes are called Ostara and Mabon, respectively, although these names are modern in origin and don't correspond to any ancient festivals. CBC | Top Stories News
  • However, the measure intended to foster democracy will result in all three party leaders imposing a three-line whip on their respective MPs – a move hardly likely to ease the public's mistrust of Parliament. European Union: The referendum is an absurd sideshow | Observer editorial
  • Cult mezzo Magdalena Kozena and silvery soprano Carolyn Sampson sound gorgeous, but are on the cool side as Paris and Cupid respectively.
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