reapportion

VERB
  1. allocate, distribute, or apportion anew
    Congressional seats are reapportioned on the basis of census data
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How To Use reapportion In A Sentence

  • After the next census is taken, Congress would reapportion seats based on population and revert to 435 as established in 1911.
  • It's not news, of course, that the Supreme Court's one-person, one-vote standard applies to reapportionments but not to the selection of presidents.
  • The only hope is that the U.S. Supreme Court will recognize that the prime purpose of the census every 10 years is to reapportion the states and that any reapportionment beyond the first one is unconstitutional.
  • Members of reapportioned legislatures, particularly those from previously underrepresented areas adamantly opposed any retreat from ‘one man, one vote.’
  • States and boundaries disappear while new ones emerge, the world is being reapportioned and nobody, least of all the German government, is prepared to stay on the sidelines.
  • When two gas molecules collide, they can reapportion their energy in any way that leaves the total unchanged.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Census Bureau could not create statistical models to fill the projected gaps in the undercount as a way of ‘reapportioning’ U.S. Congressional districts.
  • Others did not seem to know about the second-round process where the votes that went to small parties that did not get seats would be reapportioned to the parties that did win.
  • It's worth going back and reading or rereading the reasons Justice Frankfurter gave for opposing judicial reapportionment, back in 1962.
  • It is clear that there must now be a reapportioning of power.
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