[ US /ˈoʊvɝˈhɛd/ ]
ADVERB
  1. above your head; in the sky
    planes were flying overhead
  2. above the head; over the head
    bring the legs together overhead
NOUN
  1. (computer science) the processing time required by a device prior to the execution of a command
  2. the expense of maintaining property (e.g., paying property taxes and utilities and insurance); it does not include depreciation or the cost of financing or income taxes
  3. (computer science) the disk space required for information that is not data but is used for location and timing
  4. a transparency for use with an overhead projector
  5. (nautical) the top surface of an enclosed space on a ship
  6. a hard return hitting the tennis ball above your head
ADJECTIVE
  1. located or originating from above
    an overhead crossing
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How To Use overhead In A Sentence

  • Spider crabs stalked the seabed; wrasse, blennies, shannies and rockling darted over the reefs, and pollack wheeled overhead.
  • If you manage your overhead costs properly, you will impact directly on your bottom line cost base.
  • Overhead, a mewing cry announced the passing of a white-tailed sea eagle, which was being mobbed by agitated gulls.
  • It is due to the high overhead and the unhandiness of the previous fault-tolerance systems.
  • Tarl stood up and grabbed her bag from the overhead.
  • The music picked up the tempo and overhead a saxophone played sweet jazz.
  • It was being pulleyed by several cords of thick rope overhead.
  • The chimney, usually of lath and plaster, ending overhead in a cone and funnel for the smoke, was so roomy in old cottages as to accommodate almost the whole family sitting around the fire of logs piled in the reredosse in the middle, and there they carried on their winter's work. The Life of Thomas Telford
  • What mattered was the planet's diurnal position relative to the horizon - whether it was rising in the east or culminating overhead.
  • AS THE chug of a train rumbles overhead, Andy Arnold takes a seat amid the lunchtime bustle of the Arches theatre bar in Glasgow's city centre.
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