omnipresence

[ US /ˌɑmnəˈpɹɛzəns/ ]
[ UK /ɒmnˈɪpɹɛzəns/ ]
NOUN
  1. the state of being everywhere at once (or seeming to be everywhere at once)
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How To Use omnipresence In A Sentence

  • I think a large part of the improvement in customer service is due to the potential omnipresence of monitors on the call lines.
  • On every hand we hear proclaimed a form of the doctrine of God's omnipresence (usually called the divine "immanence") which not only denies all distinction between the original Creation and the present perpetuation of the world, but a form which practically denies all second causes, and which cannot well be distinguished from pantheism, though it would be a spiritualistic or "idealistic" form of pantheism, or "monism," to use the favorite modern term. Q. E. D., or New Light on the Doctrine of Creation
  • God's knowing what we will choose is a function of His omnipresence since He is in all places all the time.
  • Not this rock only; his omnipresence fills," was "peculiar as having a distinct syllable of overmeasure. Among My Books Second Series
  • But even if we concede all that the scientist claims for his conception of God; if we grant that terms like "omnipresence" and "omniscience" and "progress" clothe themselves with new force in the Copernican and Newtonian and Understanding the Scriptures
  • For Zwingli, Luther's affirmation of a human body's omnipresence inevitably negated the very essence of what a human body is entirely.
  • That omnipresence which is possessed 'by that,' i.e. by Brahman, and which is known 'from declarations of extent,' and so on, i.e. from texts which declare Brahman to be all-pervading, is also known from texts such as 'higher than that there is nothing.' The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja — Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48
  • Pacs, one of the first such programs in the nation, was founded on the premise that war and other forms of violence are neither inevitable nor ineradicable, despite their omnipresence in human history.
  • The conservatives cited the omnipresence of God in the classroom and the right of students to pray to Him.
  • The omnipresence of the past is the key to his exemplary production.
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