omerta

NOUN
  1. a code of silence practiced by the Mafia; a refusal to give evidence to the police about criminal activities
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How To Use omerta In A Sentence

  • He asked Mr Murdoch if he had heard of the mafia and then asked if he had heard the phrase 'omerta', the mafia code of silence. Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph
  • The phrase is widely misunderstood, thought to refer to an all-pervasive omerta that barred anyone in Spain speaking of the Franco past after his death, thereby keeping a lid on memories that was only recently blown off. Spain and the lingering legacy of Franco
  • But I have to report that something is up in the great British locker room - and to tell you about it I'm prepared to break the "omerta" of the sporting gentleman, the code of silence that for centuries has surrounded what goes on when chaps ablute together. Telegraph.co.uk: news business sport the Daily Telegraph newspaper Sunday Telegraph
  • And in a final slap to the Italian detective, Mr. Lally noted that Pellicano's computer passwords always included the term "omerta" -- the Sicilian word for code of silence. Allison Hope Weiner: The Pellicano Trial: The Detective's "Special Services"
  • Tom Watson asked James Murdoch, who is facing the Commons Select Committee for the second time, whether he was familiar with the mafia term 'omerta' - commonly defined as a "code of silence". Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph
  • They told me spine-chilling tales of what they did to informers - or ‘Brussels touts’ as they called those who broke the omerta - the centuries-old Irish code of silence.
  • Mark Stafford, a fourth-generation scion of one of Leinster's most prominent business dynasties, has decided to end his family's informal media omerta.
  • Their omertà, or vow of silence, is made easier by the anonymity of the Web.
  • But on Wednesday the Vatican's top official for dealing with sexual abuse of minors, Monsignor Charles Scicluna, said hiding behind a culture of "omerta" - the Italian word for the Mafia's code of silence - would be deadly for the Church. Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion
  • That's what the Mafia do to people who break the omerta vow of silence. A CONVICTION OF GUILT
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