oil cake

NOUN
  1. mass of e.g. linseed or cottonseed or soybean from which the oil has been pressed; used as food for livestock
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How To Use oil cake In A Sentence

  • It comprises especially agroindustrial by-products (oil cake, beer mash), but also relatively nutritious harvest residues, such as groundnut and nieb straw. 1. Selection of animals
  • I had always enjoyed the kitchen, but now I would make pumpkin ravioli from scratch on Thursday and cooka black bass in parchment on Friday and bake an olive-oil cake onSaturday.
  • Moist tangerine-olive-oil cake is her mother's winning recipe; a rustic galette is short on sugar, big on natural fruit flavor.
  • Now the son-in-law was a great hunter and that day he had killed and brought home a peacock; as he was leaving, the father said "My daughter, if your husband ever brings home a peacock I advise you to cook it with mowah oil cake; that makes it taste very nice. Folklore of the Santal Parganas
  • So directly her father had gone, the woman set to work and cooked the peacock with mowah oil cake; but when her husband and children began to eat it they found it horribly bitter and she herself tasted it and found it uneatable; then she told them that her father had made fun of her and made her spoil all the meat. Folklore of the Santal Parganas
  • Flax seeds can be crushed for linseed oil (also known as flaxseed oil), and the pressed remains (sometimes called oil cake) can be used for animal feed. News from www.pantagraph.com
  • Extracting qualified tea saponin from the oil-tea cake is the premise of synthetically utilize tea-oil cake .
  • Extracting qualified tea saponin from the oil-tea cake is the premise of synthetically utilize tea-oil cake .
  • The spurious pepper is made up of oil cakes (the residue of lintseed, from which the oil has been pressed,) common clay, and a portion of Cayenne pepper, formed in a mass, and granulated by being first pressed through a sieve, and then rolled in a cask. A Treatise on Adulterations of Food, and Culinary Poisons Exhibiting the Fraudulent Sophistications of Bread, Beer, Wine, Spiritous Liquors, Tea, Coffee, Cream, Confectionery, Vinegar, Mustard, Pepper, Cheese, Olive Oil, Pickles, and Other Articles Employ
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