[ US /ˈmæn/ ]
[ UK /mˈæn/ ]
NOUN
  1. a male subordinate
    the chief stationed two men outside the building
    he awaited word from his man in Havana
  2. the generic use of the word to refer to any human being
    it was every man for himself
  3. an adult male person who has a manly character (virile and courageous competent)
    the army will make a man of you
  4. a male person who plays a significant role (husband or lover or boyfriend) in the life of a particular woman
    she takes good care of her man
  5. an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    there were two women and six men on the bus
  6. all of the living human inhabitants of the earth
    all the world loves a lover
    she always used `humankind' because `mankind' seemed to slight the women
  7. a manservant who acts as a personal attendant to his employer
    Jeeves was Bertie Wooster's man
  8. game equipment consisting of an object used in playing certain board games
    he taught me to set up the men on the chess board
    he sacrificed a piece to get a strategic advantage
  9. any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
  10. someone who serves in the armed forces; a member of a military force
    two men stood sentry duty
VERB
  1. provide with workers
    We cannot man all the desks
    Students were manning the booths
  2. take charge of a certain job; occupy a certain work place
    Mr. Smith manned the reception desk in the morning
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How To Use man In A Sentence

  • When the new foods that came from the Americas - peppers, summer squash and especially tomatoes - took hold in the region, a number of closely related dishes were born, including what we call ratatouille - and a man from La Mancha calls pisto, an Ikarian Greek calls soufiko and a Turk calls turlu. NYT > Home Page
  • Some were members of Turkey's elite military class known as "pashas," a title of respect harking back to Ottoman military commanders Monday for allegedly planning to blow up mosques in order to trigger a military takeover and overthrow the WN.com - Photown News
  • These observations will provide a valuable supplement to the simultaneous records of other expeditions, especially the British in McMurdo Sound and the German in Weddell Sea, above all as regards the hypsometer observations (for the determination of altitude) on sledge journeys. The South Pole~ Remarks on the Meteorological Observations at Framheim
  • Their dried dung is found everywhere, and is in many places the only fuel afforded by the plains; their skulls, which last longer than any other part of the animal, are among the most familiar of objects to the plainsman; their bones are in many districts so plentiful that it has become a regular industry, followed by hundreds of men (christened "bone hunters" by the frontiersmen), to go out with wagons and collect them in great numbers for the sake of the phosphates they yield; and Bad Lands, plateaus, and prairies alike, are cut up in all directions by the deep ruts which were formerly buffalo trails. VIII. The Lordly Buffalo
  • But at lunch on the first day we were approached by the helpful Hotel Manager Henri and offered a swap to an overwater bungalow.
  • People at MSFC have told me over drinks that this study concluded that EELV are human ratable but they were going to do what Griffin wanted. Obama Policies on Transparency, Openness, and Participation - and NASA - NASA Watch
  • He wrote and tcanslaited many fortunate connexion « Mr. Boweai other works, and among the rest being unable to pay the costs in-* wa»the author of one play, called curred by the suit in the Spiritual Biographia dramatica, or, A companion to the playhouse:
  • That gave us the time to move arbalests and mangonels into position along the walls.
  • The Plover is to be communicated with each year by a man-of-war — the Amphitrite is the next. The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II
  • It is recognised as a crime against humanity under international law.
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