[ US /ˈneɪv/ ]
[ UK /nˈe‍ɪv/ ]
NOUN
  1. a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
  2. one of four face cards in a deck bearing a picture of a young prince
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How To Use knave In A Sentence

  • Campbell country; now, as I say, they were very snod, the scurviest of the knaves set up with his hosen and brogues. John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn
  • Le Mercier was a pickthank, angling after the favor of La Pompadour, -- a pretentious knave, as hollow as one of his own mortars. The Golden Dog
  • About 600 guests flocked to the Knavesmire Stand at York Racecourse for the glittering event with live bands, discos, food, casinos and prize competitions.
  • Bold knaves thrive without one grain of sense . But good men starve for want of impudence.
  • Dank, damp and almost unrelievedly joyless, the Starz miniseries tells a fictional tale of 12th-century politics and the skullduggery that was supposedly part of it, as knaves and heretics vie for the throne of a mucky, pig-ridden and sparsely populated England. TV preview: 'The Pillars of the Earth'
  • He hid a knave of hearts in his pocket.
  • Above all, she could not understand why, since she had acquaintances in the family, and since the Dame Glendinning had always paid her multure and knaveship duly, the said lass of the mill had not come in to rest herself and eat a morsel, and tell her the current news of the water. The Monastery
  • “How, or what do you mean?” said Nigel; “I will break your head, you drunken knave, if you palter with me any longer.” The Fortunes of Nigel
  • Sixtus the Fifth was the son of a swineherd, and raised himself to the popedom by his abilities: he was a great knave, but an able and singular one. Letters to his son on The Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman
  • Those who tried to delude the people into believing that this was the last war were either fools or knaves, and he inclined to think that there were more knaves than fools.
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