[ US /ˈkaɪt/ ]
[ UK /kˈa‍ɪt/ ]
VERB
  1. soar or fly like a kite
    The pilot kited for a long time over the mountains
  2. fly a kite
    They kited the Red Dragon model
    Kids were kiting in the park
  3. increase the amount (of a check) fraudulently
    He kited many checks
  4. get credit or money by using a bad check
    The businessman kited millions of dollars
NOUN
  1. a bank check that has been fraudulently altered to increase its face value
  2. plaything consisting of a light frame covered with tissue paper; flown in wind at end of a string
  3. a bank check drawn on insufficient funds at another bank in order to take advantage of the float
  4. any of several small graceful hawks of the family Accipitridae having long pointed wings and feeding on insects and small animals
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How To Use kite In A Sentence

  • Nicolas, who lives in Pondicherry, India, makes his own kites using siliconised nylon and carbon sticks. Home | Mail Online
  • Flying this kite among the otherwise conventional swept wings on a breezy day was initially eerie.
  • Kitesurfing involves riding a small board over water while gaining propulsion from the wind by means of a large kite.
  • Kitesurfing evolved in the mid-1990s out of other extreme water sports, combining the most exciting elements of windsurfing and wakeboarding and taking them to vastly greater heights.
  • But nobody owned up to being among the 24 who had kited $1,000 a month or more. Who Says There's No Free Lunch?
  • And then there are the funny ones such as ning nong, doofus, blatherskite. Etymology – the origins of words « Write Anything
  • Nearly the only cadmium mineral known is the sulphide, greenockite, but no deposits of this mineral have been found of sufficient volume to be called cadmium ores. The Economic Aspect of Geology
  • Along with elaborate vessels and sculpted creatures, Diakite creates platters, plates, bowls, and a variety of other forms that are sold as both functional objects and works of art.
  • Other birds to benefit nationally include song thrushes, red kites, skylarks and nightjars.
  • He says countless messages -- what inmates call kites -- are passed to the outside. CNN Transcript May 17, 2005
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