Karl Popper

NOUN
  1. British philosopher (born in Austria) who argued that scientific theories can never be proved to be true, but are tested by attempts to falsify them (1902-1994)
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How To Use Karl Popper In A Sentence

  • [14] yet the dictionary doesn't yet recognize it exculpatory often used in the phrase "exculpatory evidence," it took nearly 50 years to develop this term after origination of the legal term suggesting guilt: "incriminate" falsifiability first emphasized by Karl Popper in 1934, this helps define science: if a proposition is false, then it can be shown to be false. Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]
  • Science must always allow itself doubt in order to advance: it is not simply a case of complying with Karl Popper's strictures on the need for theories to be vulnerable to disproof.
  • In his writings Karl Popper questioned the positivism and teleological historicism of the modern age.
  • In his autobiography, he describes himself as ‘an unregenerate Popperian,’ an adherent of Karl Popper's concept of ‘predictionism, that is, the idea that theories must ultimately be judged by the accuracy of their prediction.’
  • Apart from his celebrated writings on the 'open society' and its enemies, Karl Popper is chiefly known as a logician of science who has denied that science employs induction, and who has claimed that what demarcates science from nonscience, in particular metaphysics, is that scientists seek the truth by vigorously trying to falsify their theories. The Romantic Rationalist
  • [13] yet the dictionary doesn't yet recognize it exculpatory often used in the phrase "exculpatory evidence," it took nearly 50 years to develop this term after origination of the legal term suggesting guilt: "incriminate" falsifiability first emphasized by Karl Popper in 1934, this helps define science: if a proposition is false, then it can be shown to be false. Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]
  • Conspiracy Theories: The Philosophical Debate, the term conspiracy theory started to carry negative connotations after the philosopher Karl Popper wrote, during the Third Reich, that conspiracy theories propelled the paranoid ideologies that gave rise to totalitarian regimes such as that of Adolf Hitler. AlterNet.org Main RSS Feed
  • Karl Popper endorses fallibilism, which he defines as ‘the view, or the acceptance of the fact, that we may err, and that the quest for certainty (or even the quest for high probability) is a mistaken quest.’
  • Although Karl Popper really described himself as a liberalist, these factors made people naturally infer that he would hold rightist stance in politics.
  • The other two great liberal theoreticians, Friedrich Hayek and Karl Popper spotted something remarkable in the young swotty New Yorker and encouraged him to argue beyond the closed world of academic text books.
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