[ US /ˌdʒɔˈkoʊz/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. characterized by jokes and good humor
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How To Use jocose In A Sentence

  • The world-sickness of the White Logic makes one grin jocosely into the face of the Noseless One and to sneer at all the phantasmagoria of living. Chapter XXXVI
  • Ixion" in "Jocoseria," is in alternate hexameter and pentameter, which the author also employs here for the only time; it imitates the turning of the wheel on which Ixion is bound. A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.)
  • City of the world, with so much of the material of jocoseness is an odd problem. Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 156, April 30, 1919
  • 'I know no life that must be so delicious as that of a writer for newspapers, or a leading member of the opposition -- to thunder forth accusations against men in power; show up the worst side of every thing that is produced; to pick holes in every coat; to be indignant, sarcastic, jocose, moral, or supercilious; to damn with faint praise, or crush with open calumny! Lance Mannion:
  • The continental peoples are grave, compared with our jocose fellow citizens, and especially in their hours of business.
  • jocosely" reminded by smiling secretaries that the competition was over, and that those who were dissatisfied with the companies 'supplies were quite at liberty to set up pumps of their own. Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 447 Volume 18, New Series, July 24, 1852
  • Liszt, that amiable critic replied that the word "grotesque" had no place in piano playing -- that they should properly be called jocose, or something of that sort. The Masters and their Music A series of illustrative programs with biographical, esthetical, and critical annotations
  • You must not overwork at your editorial desk, my boy," he called jocosely from the distant threshold. Paul and the Printing Press
  • Yet can we wonder at the jocoseness of those arrayed in lawn and broad-cloth -- can we marvel at the simper of the artisan fresh from his beef and pudding, solaced with tobacco and porter? Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, October 2, 1841
  • Jorgen Kiil plays the jocose patriarch, an ageing, overweight male nurse.
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