jesting

[ UK /d‍ʒˈɛstɪŋ/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. characterized by jokes and good humor
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How To Use jesting In A Sentence

  • Among the heathen, jesting was counted a virtue, and therefore received the title "eutrapelia" by Aristotle. Epistle Sermons, Vol. II Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost
  • Hence they are querulous, and not disposed to jesting or laughter-the love of laughter being the very opposite of querulousness. Rhetoric
  • However, this jesting is written by people who really know their Canadiana. Being There : Bev Vincent
  • --- And then I have a queer humour o 'my ain, that sets a strolling beggar weel eneugh, whase word naebody minds --- but ye ken Sir Arthur has odd sort o' ways --- and I wad be jesting or scorning at them The Antiquary
  • In this street the happy, jesting, jostling crowd is in one continuous "festa". Brazilian Sketches
  • I take Heaven to witness, after all my jesting, my heart is innocent, and the sports of my pen just like those of my infancy when I rode cockhorse on a stick. Criticisms and Interpretations. II. By Edmond Scherer
  • We laughed and jested lightly enough, as about us jostled the merry throng; but under our jesting was the deep earnestness of man and woman well advanced across the threshold of love and yet not too sure each of the other. Chapter 11
  • I tell'd the inquisitdoners, that ize drowned_, and I _told_ the _jury nither geestin nor jokin about it; but of inquest_, that _I was_ if they'd permit me to give em my _not jesting_ about it; but, _by ideze, they'd obleege me. English Grammar in Familiar Lectures
  • We laughed and jested lightly enough, as about us jostled the merry throng; but under our jesting was the deep earnestness of man and woman well advanced across the threshold of love and yet not too sure each of the other. Chapter 11
  • And then I have a queer humour o’ my ain, that sets a strolling beggar weel eneugh, whase word naebody minds — but ye ken Sir Arthur has odd sort o’ ways — and I wad be jesting or scorning at them — and ye wad be angry, and then I wad be just fit to hang mysell.” The Antiquary
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