jemmy

[ UK /d‍ʒˈɛmi/ ]
NOUN
  1. a short crowbar
    in Britain they call a jimmy and jemmy
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How To Use jemmy In A Sentence

  • Now to return to the youth in the corner: _Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit_, Jemmy keep your money, or give it to the priest to keep, and it will be safest; but by no means let the Hyblean honey of the schoolmaster's blarney deprive you of it, otherwise it will be a _vale, vale, longum vale_ between you. The Poor Scholar Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of William Carleton, Volume Three
  • You don't try to break into a bank by jemmying the front door. Frost at Christmas
  • `Once we heard, we sent our Jemmy around with the grommet, Tim, to round up all the folks who played their part. THE RIVAL QUEENS: A COUNTESS ASHBY DE LA ZOUCHE MYSTERY
  • `Once we heard, we sent our Jemmy around with the grommet, Tim, to round up all the folks who played their part. THE RIVAL QUEENS: A COUNTESS ASHBY DE LA ZOUCHE MYSTERY
  • Yet any half-competent peterman with a sectional jemmy would have ripped it open inside five minutes. A QUESTION OF PRINCIPLE
  • Devon and Cornwall Police has said it is investigating claims that officers illegally tried to "jemmy" the locked door with their metal batons after one of them dropped their phone in the back of the car during a search. Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph
  • Now, "says he, leaning close," I'll lay odds the Holnup will come through the garden in the dead watch, around four, lay out the sentry quietly, jemmy the door, then upstairs and good-night Franz-Josef, all hail Crown Prince Rudolf! Watershed
  • The man in the shop, perhaps, is in the baked 'jemmy' line, or the fire-wood and hearth-stone line, or any other line which requires a floating capital of eighteen-pence or thereabouts: and he and his family live in the shop, and the small back parlour behind it. Sketches by Boz, illustrative of everyday life and every-day people
  • Your lock picks, your jemmy and your glass cutter and whatever else you carry round with you on your nocturnal wanderings. A CONVICTION OF GUILT
  • Where would be all this fine crockery work for your breakfast? you might pop your head under a pump, or drink out of your own paw; what would you do for that fine jemmy tye? Cecilia
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