[ UK /d‍ʒˈɛləs/ ]
[ US /ˈdʒɛɫəs/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another's advantages
    he was never covetous before he met her
    envious of their art collection
    jealous of his success and covetous of his possessions
  2. suspicious or unduly suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival
    a jealous lover
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How To Use jealous In A Sentence

  • The following years were characterized by rifts with Russia, in which the Ukraine jealously guarded its own independence against its overbearing neighbour.
  • Distrust naturally creates distrust, and by nothing is good-will and kind conduct more speedily changed than by invidious jealousies and uncandid imputations, whether expressed or implied.
  • Some spouses tend to nag or criticise each other; others may be jealous or possessive. Times, Sunday Times
  • These successes, if that is what they are, are tinged with a jealousy that legal writers elsewhere have a more publicly acknowledged involvement in moulding the law's development.
  • He discovers he is aroused by jealousy, so he encourages the young doctor to flirt with his wife.
  • Jealous Liberal Journalists Attack Keith Olbermann yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'Jealous Liberal Journalists Attack Keith Olbermann'; yahooBuzzArticleSummary = 'Article: Lookout Keith Olbermann: now that you are more popular than Bill O\'Reilly in the cable news Neilson ratings, you must confront an even bigger monster, an even more tenacious adversary, an egomaniacally superior life-species: establishment liberal journalists.' Jealous Liberal Journalists Attack Keith Olbermann
  • None rested quiet or mute for a second, except the one who kept close as his shadow to her father's side, and unwittingly was treated by him less like the other children, than like some stray spirit of another world, caught and held jealously, but without much outward notice, lest haply it might take alarm, and vanish back again unawares. John Halifax, Gentleman
  • 'It must be -- eight o'clock,' said the gasping voice -- '_eight o'clock_;' and the tone became a whisper, as though the idea thus half involuntarily revealed had been drawn jealously back into the strongholds of consciousness. Robert Elsmere
  • Jealousy and suspicion are eroding our friendship.
  • Those on the left side accentuate anger, hate, jealousy, and selfishness. The Bushman Way of Tracking God
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