J

[ UK /d‍ʒˈe‍ɪ/ ]
[ US /ˈdʒeɪ/ ]
NOUN
  1. the 10th letter of the Roman alphabet
  2. a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second
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How To Use J In A Sentence

  • It's not bad but neither is it brilliant - which won't bother 99 per cent of buyers one jot as they are in it for the image.
  • Jeff, clad in board trunks and a T-shirt, leans back in his chair with the lappie on his, uhhh, lap, and his bare feet up on the desk. Savages
  • When we see her, we remember that hot July day doing five knots pulling Jess and Jerry on a tube and Russ skippering his first yacht.
  • In my view his confrontational, gladiatorial style has been a major contributor to the widespread disdain of the British public for politicians generally. Times, Sunday Times
  • A little pyrotechnics display tacked on just serves to emphasise its lack of cutting edge. Times, Sunday Times
  • I'm just a little bit caught in the middle. Life is a maze and love is a riddle, I don't know where to go, can't do it alone.
  • These observations will provide a valuable supplement to the simultaneous records of other expeditions, especially the British in McMurdo Sound and the German in Weddell Sea, above all as regards the hypsometer observations (for the determination of altitude) on sledge journeys. The South Pole~ Remarks on the Meteorological Observations at Framheim
  • I badly wanted the job, but knew that my age would probably tell against me.
  • Their dried dung is found everywhere, and is in many places the only fuel afforded by the plains; their skulls, which last longer than any other part of the animal, are among the most familiar of objects to the plainsman; their bones are in many districts so plentiful that it has become a regular industry, followed by hundreds of men (christened "bone hunters" by the frontiersmen), to go out with wagons and collect them in great numbers for the sake of the phosphates they yield; and Bad Lands, plateaus, and prairies alike, are cut up in all directions by the deep ruts which were formerly buffalo trails. VIII. The Lordly Buffalo
  • Laura Wade's Posh, timed to open as the Tories edged into power in May 2010, reminded us just what we were in for: overprivileged hooligans in drinking-society blazers who trash a pub as thoughtlessly as they will trash the country. Dominic Cooke: a life in theatre
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