extravagance

View Synonyms
[ US /ɛkˈstɹævəɡəns/ ]
[ UK /ɛkstɹˈævəɡəns/ ]
NOUN
  1. the quality of exceeding the appropriate limits of decorum or probability or truth
    we were surprised by the extravagance of his description
  2. the trait of spending extravagantly
  3. excessive spending
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use extravagance In A Sentence

  • Lord Allen may have been wrong in his head, or ill-advised, or foolishly over-zealous, but his ill-tempered upbraiding of the Dublin Corporation for what he called their treasonable extravagance in thus honouring Swift, whom he deemed an enemy of the King, was the act of a fool. The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. - Volume 07 Historical and Political Tracts-Irish
  • The American people with one consent gave themselves to an amazing extravagance of land speculation.
  • Such a cosmogonic extravagance appeared to diminish the magnificence of the created order in our own world.
  • RB: So what is your biggest extravagance? The Sun
  • Davies, wishing to give dignity to his Celtic mythology, determines to find the arkite idolatry there too, and the style in which he proceeds to do this affords a good specimen of the extravagance which has caused Celtic antiquity to be looked upon with so much suspicion. Celtic Literature
  • It's failure is based on unrivalled extravagance and excess, poor management and a desire to ignore any form of business or common sense.
  • Brother Jonathan," then just published by Blackwood in three large volumes, was read to him every night for weeks, and greatly to his satisfaction, as I then understood; though it seems by what Dr. Bowring -- I beg his pardon, Sir John Bowring -- says on the subject, that the "white-haired sage" was wide enough awake, on the whole, to form a pretty fair estimate of its unnaturalness and extravagance: being himself a great admirer of Richardson's ten-volume stories, like The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 97, November, 1865
  • Towards Christmas, expect to see knits which have taken the fashion craze for extravagance the whole way - and why not?
  • By his late twenties, Disraeli's sartorial and social extravagance had left him deep in debt.
  • For a prime minister who fought the election on improving public services, such increases look like thoughtless and tactless extravagance.
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy