[ UK /ɛkstɹˈe‍ɪni‍əs/ ]
[ US /ɛkˈstɹeɪniəs/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. coming from the outside
    relying upon an extraneous income
    extraneous light in the camera spoiled the photograph
    disdaining outside pressure groups
  2. not essential
    the ballet struck me as extraneous and somewhat out of keeping with the rest of the play
  3. not belonging to that in which it is contained; introduced from an outside source
    foreign particles in milk
    water free of extraneous matter
  4. not pertinent to the matter under consideration
    the price was immaterial
    an issue extraneous to the debate
    mentioned several impertinent facts before finally coming to the point
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How To Use extraneous In A Sentence

  • Age is here, but it does not suggest the idea of dilapidation or decay; rather of something which has been put under a glass case, and preserved with care from all extraneous influences. Rambles of an Archaeologist Among Old Books and in Old Places Being Papers on Art, in Relation to Archaeology, Painting, Art-Decoration, and Art-Manufacture
  • This norm encourages people to add a lot of extraneous self-indulgent stuff because they see the guests as a captive audience.
  • It can't: it is crammed with lovers packed in tight, the details smashed flat, extraneous facts shorn away to save space, mangled and compressed to the point of incomprehensibility and all beyond counting or collating.
  • Effective cleaning methods include presoaking and manual, ultrasonic, or washer/ decontaminator cleaning to remove soil and extraneous material.
  • Part of the problem here surely goes to Sarris's editor, who should have been able to reduce the amount of extraneous material.
  • Occasionally found in some knees, it is a ridge or fold of extraneous soft tissue with no known biomechanical function.
  • With the extraneous materials strained from the rock mantle, there was still a good core of iron, nickel, zinc, and copper.
  • No self-indulgent twaddle, no luvvy duvvy waffle, no tedious explaining what we're looking at, no extraneous family members self-aggrandising and hogging the airtime with totally irrelevant bullshit. Update
  • Often the teacher gives extraneous material with nothing to reference.
  • Overall, the authors' main points are clearly presented and thoroughly explained and without the intrusion of extraneous material.
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