euro

[ UK /jˈɔːɹə‍ʊ/ ]
[ US /ˈjuɹoʊ, ˈjʊɹə, ˈjʊɹoʊ/ ]
NOUN
  1. the basic monetary unit of most members of the European Union (introduced in 1999); in 2002 twelve European nations (Germany, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Austria, Finland) adopted the euro as their basic unit of money and abandoned their traditional currencies
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How To Use euro In A Sentence

  • The difficulties of the next year or two will, no doubt, reawaken the pro-euro lobby.
  • Two years later she was omitted from the European squad that relinquished the trophy in Minnesota.
  • This sort of enamel work on a faceted metal body was copied from the enamelled European watches.
  • For him, cruelty was a legitimate and necessary procedure, almost a profession of faith, and European artists showed him how to excruciate a tame local reality.
  • Europe was last united in neolithic times, before the inseparable meshwork of land, people, community and trade separated into hierarchy, nations and cities.
  • Over Fate of Georgia, Provinces With Russian forces appearing to hunker down in Georgia, U.S. and European officials now face a pricklier challenge: Moscow's insistence that it has the right to help break up the country. U.S.-Russia Relations Turn Cold
  • The focus is on relationships among European countries.
  • Hi! ufficio immatricolazione catania Croce italia marche bollino blu euro 4 Campo golf irrigazione risultato roma milan fiamma tricolore emilia nome canzone cd rudebox COMPRA PLAYSTATION 3 ADESSO biomassa sansa esausta 509 99 perito industriale Reso Condemning MoveOn Passes Overwhelmingly, With Lots Of Dems
  • So the lands of the dismembered Yugoslav state became not only the scene of Europe's greatest resistance struggle, but also one of its bloodiest civil wars.
  • A second wave of emigrations of Ashkenazic Jews from Eastern Europe at the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries brought larger numbers of Yiddish-speaking, traditional Orthodox Jews into the Seattle community. Weaving Women's Words: Seattle Stories
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